startup weekend

Christa Corrigan/Missouri Business Alert

 

  Columbia's Parkade Center opened in 1965. It was built on a prime location off of Interstate 70 — a new freeway reshaping the American approach to commerce. Parkrade Center was once the premier shopping destination in mid-Missouri. However that changes after the Columbia Mall opened in 1985. After struggling to keep businesses and shoppers for years, the center has shifted its business model in the past decade, and its business appears to be improved and stabilized. Missouri Business Alert's Christa Corrigan reports on the comeback of the once lifeless shopping center.

Startup weekend in Columbia starts on Friday, kicking off a fifty-four-hour boot camp at the Museao Building in south Columbia. People will work in teams to pitch and develop their business ideas with the help of mentors during the boot camp. At the end of the weekend, they'll present their business plans to a panel of judges, who will them select the winners. Missouri Business Alert’s Elizabeth Tharakan explores how Columbia’s Startup Weekend has recently become a springboard for health care IT companies.

Listen to the story here.

With items on the menu like the Storm Trooper Dog, the Al Hra-BRAT-ski and the Crazy Cajun Creole dog, it's clear that Steve’s Hot Dogs on the Hill considers its fare more than hot dogs.

"I could eat the entire menu," regular Don Schroeder laughed.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

It’s about that time of year when hog farmers begin the annual process of pumping a year’s worth of manure out of the pits under their barns. The nutrient-rich slurry will fertilize cropland. But there’s an ongoing problem in these pits: a mysterious foam that sometimes forms on the manure. As Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer explains, no one quite understands why gases get trapped in the pits, but the foam has been causing explosions. That’s right; this is a story about exploding manure pits.

Scott Pham / KBIA

  This week the Como Explained team goes to Startup Weekend, the premier event for Columbia's booming (really!) tech scene:


Scott Pham / KBIA

  

  Startups are an important part of any community, but they’re especially important for a city that’s adding population, but shedding jobs in sectors like manufacturing. Businesses that are being built now could be the badly needed employers of the future.

Columbia software startup Zapier won the first ever Columbia Startup Weekend and rode that success all the way to Silicon Valley. When I last spoke to the trio, they had finished a mentorship program at the Y Combinator in California and were confident about the future. When I last spoke with Zapier in late September, I asked founder Wade Foster if he was talking with investors. He would say only "our biggest thing is just getting back to work and growing the product and user base." Now Zapier is hiring their first employee and pouring resources into the next iteration of their web-based services.

From sketches to pitches at Startup Weekend

Oct 5, 2012
water bottles
Cale Sears

Last Friday, more than a hundred would-be entrepreneurs got together for an annual event called Startup Weekend.  The fast paced, company building workshop brings big ideas down to earth in just 54 hours.  125 participants with laptop and smartphones gather to build small, lean companies that might grow into something much bigger.