state auditor

Within minutes of the news of Auditor Tom Schweich's death, Gov. Jay Nixon ordered all flags on Missouri property lowered to half-staff.

But the governor will soon have a much bigger decision to make: who to appoint as Schweich's successor.

Missouri law seems to suggest that a decision must be made rapidly:

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich died Thursday; he was 54.

In June 2003, Schweich was a guest on “St. Louis on the Air,” hosted by Mike Sampson. At the time, Schweich was partner at Bryan Cave, Missouri’s oldest law firm, where he helped manage internal audits and investigations for large companies. Schweich also had published a book, “Staying Power: 30 Secrets Invincible Executives Use for Getting to the Top — and Staying There.”

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich came across as a relatively mild-mannered politician, but when he formally declared his candidacy for governor last month, he came out swinging.

(Updated 5:10 p.m.)

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich has died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, shocking the state’s political world and throwing turmoil into the state’s 2016 contest for governor.

Talking Politics: 2014 Election Preview

Oct 27, 2014
State of Missouri

 

In this episode of Talking Politics, Prof. Terry Smith of Columbia College gives us an overview of the upcoming 2014 election.  Marshall Griffin gives us a look at Tom Schweich’s bid for state auditor that appears to be turning into a bid for governor. Finally, KBIA’s Bram Sable-Smith will walk us through the Columbia Police Department’s implementation of body cameras.

vote here sign
KBIA file photo

Federal and state elections in Missouri this fall will feature the lowest number of candidates in at least a couple of decades. A total of 429 candidates filed for federal and state offices before yesterday's deadline.

The highest profile state office to be elected this fall is that of the state auditor. Incumbent auditor Tom Schweich is seeking his second four-year term, but will not face any Democratic or Republican opposition.

Schweich's only challengers are Libertarian Sean O'Toole and Constitution Party candidate Rodney Farthing.

Photo courtesy of the Missouri Auditor's Office

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich says a newly enacted law will give him greater flexibility in determining when and how to audit governmental agencies.

Schweich said Monday that the measure regarding the auditor's authority updates the state's World War II-era statutes and increases accountability in government. He said it clarifies the legality of many things the office already does, such as performance audits of agencies.

Gov. Jay Nixon signed the bill last Friday without much comment.