state of the union

In so many ways, Jan. 20, 2009, was a frightful day to be taking the oath of office.

The U.S. economy was in free fall as Barack Obama rose to deliver his inaugural address. "We are in the midst of crisis," he said. "Homes have been lost, jobs shed, businesses shuttered."

Exactly six years later, Obama is returning to Capitol Hill to deliver a State of the Union address at 9 p.m. EST. He is expected to highlight the economic progress that has been made since that frigid Day One — and call for more changes.

Even in the era of declining television audiences, President Obama's State of the Union address is still the biggest audience he'll have all year. Historically, seventh-year State of the Union speeches have a short shelf life. Every one of the five lame-duck presidents (that is, presidents constitutionally barred from running again — Eisenhower, Reagan, Clinton, George W. Bush and Obama) has had opposition congresses, making the prospects for passing major parts of the president's agenda slim to none.

The minimum wage in Missouri increased 10 cents to $7.35 cents to start the New Year.

That may go up in the near future.

In the State of the Union address, President Barack Obama said he wants to raise the minimum wage to $9 an hour.

“Today, a full-time worker making the minimum wage earns $14,500 a year. Even with the tax relief we've put in place, a family with two kids that earns the minimum wage still lives below the poverty line. That's wrong,” Obama said.

Andrew Yost / KBIA

President Obama will speak to the nation with the annual State of the Union address Tuesday night. Columbia citizens voiced their expectations for the address, commenting on Obama’s previous term and what expectations they had for the next four years. Some were hopeful, while others were more disgruntled.