storm

Missouri Storms

Sep 10, 2014
Thomas Bresson

A heavy rain storm left much of northern Missouri facing low-level flooding and cleaning up mostly minor damage caused by tornadoes and high winds.

The National Weather Service says 10 inches of rain was reported in Sullivan County near Browning early Wednesday, with 9 inches in Kirksville. Rainfall reports between 5 and 8 inches were common across northern Missouri, with many streets closed due to flooding.

A short section of Interstate 29 near Mound City was closed early Wednesday while stranded cars were removed.

Kellie Moore, ColumbiaFAVS.com

 

When a tornado devastated Joplin in spring 2011, South Joplin Christian Church didn’t have a plan.

“The reality is that I remember no conversations where we said, ‘We could do this and this, and be prepared for part of our town being wiped off the map, for our church being damaged, and for many of our families losing their homes and businesses,” said Jill Michel, the church’s pastor. “There were no conversations that started that way.”

Hail
Alexandra Olgin / KBIA

The Storm Prediction Center says there is a slight risk of severe weather in parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma on Thursday. The greatest risk will be in western Arkansas, southwestern Missouri and eastern Oklahoma.

Wikimedia Commons / wikimedia commons

President Barack Obama has declared a major disaster declaration after severe storms struck Missouri from May 29 to June 10.

Storms packing rain, snow and dangerous winds have raked the Midwest, spawning a possible tornado outside of St. Louis that prompted an emergency declaration from Missouri's governor.

To the north icy weather left thousands without power and prompted Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton to call out the state National Guard to aid residents as the state braced for another storm system that threatened to dump several inches of wet snow Thursday.

MoDOT

The Missouri Department of Transportation has issued a travel advisory for the weekend because of anticipated snowfalls of up to three inches per hour that could make driving nearly impossible at times.

Rain is expected to turn to snow Saturday afternoon across the state, posing a risk for travelers because of the rate of snowfall and lack of visibility. The storm is expected to continue until about noon Sunday in the western part of Missouri and taper off across the state throughout the day.

Missouri River
KBIA

Some Midwestern rivers that were near record lows are on the verge of flooding after storms dumped up to 3 inches of rain, giving a boost to drought-ravaged waterways.

Storm teams with the National Weather Service spent much of Wednesday studying storm damage in Southern Missouri.