sudan

AP Photo

The United Nations says that the world is facing the worst food crisis since World War II. Two of the hardest hit countries are in East Africa. In South Sudan, the UN has made its first formal famine declaration in six years.

Meanwhile drought and conflict in nearby Somalia are leading to comparisons with that country's 2011 famine, where 250,000 people died. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the challenges to heading off mass starvation in two of the world's poorest countries.


AP Photo

Until recently, Ethiopia has been hailed as an African success story. After a decade of strong economic growth, the country has begun to shed its image as a famine-struck wasteland.

But repression by Ethiopia’s authoritarian government has sparked demonstrations that have led to the deaths of hundreds of protesters this year.

The movement gained worldwide attention at the Rio Olympics when the country’s silver medal-winning marathon runner Feyisa Lilesa crossed his wrists above his head at the finish line in a symbol of the protest movement.

The Missouri Senate is advancing a proposed ban on state investments in companies with operations in countries designated as state sponsors of terrorism.

AP

After wars in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda killed nearly a million civilians, 120 nations came together to create what we know as the International Criminal Court. The goal: to prosecute those responsible for future genocides, crimes against humanity and other terrible war crimes.

But 13 years after it was created, the ICC has seen its share of controversy. Some African leaders are threatening to withdraw from the court for what they see as its unfair focus on prosecuting African cases. Others question the usefulness of a court that has convicted just two people in 13 years.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss the controversies surrounding a court set up to prosecute the world's worst criminals.


Are protests in Sudan a prelude to an 'African Spring' uprising?

Nov 7, 2013
Khalil Hamra / Associated Press

On Sept. 23, thousands of Sudanese protesters took to the streets of the capital Khartoum. The country’s autocratic leaders lifted fuel subsidies to raise revenue, leaving outraged citizens to deal with sky rocketing fuel prices. In response to the violent riots, the government imposed a 24-hour Internet blackout to strip citizens of social media communication and block the media coverage.

Photo courtesy of Pete Muller

More than a year has passed since South Sudan voted to secede from Sudan and become an independent country. But after months of escalating tension, the two Sudans are once again on the brink of an all-out war.