sustainability

Jenn Cooper / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA producer Jenn Cooper hangs out with Tao Weilundemo, the owner of Maya Creek, sustainable living commune in Calwood, Mo.


Via the PlanetReuse website

Don’t waste what can be used to sustain—that’s the idea behind PlanetReuse, a Kansas City-based company that helps contractors exchange reclaimed construction materials that would otherwise be headed to the landfill. Missouri Business Alert’s Yizhu Wang sat down with founder and CEO Nathan Benjamin at Columbia’s Sustainapalooza to talk about the firm and what it means to be the self-described “go-to solution for reuse.”

Mizzou encouraging fans to go green against Georgia

Oct 9, 2014
Karen Mitchell / KBIA Sports Extra

In an effort to promote environmental sustainability, the Missouri Athletics Department is offering prizes for people who ride their bikes to the football game against Georgia.

MU is encouraging people to park their bikes at racks on the west side of the Hearnes Center. Volunteers will be there to hand out raffle tickets to enter people into a drawing for prizes.

Fans who participate have the chance to win Mizzou apparel or a football autographed by Coach Gary Pinkel.

Columbia city officials, local businesses and residents gathered at Lucky's Market Wednesday to open nominations for the Mayor's Climate Protection Agreement Awards. The program was designed to recognize businesses for reducing global warming pollution in the community.

Columbia Water and Light's John Wulff said businesses reach out to the city looking for a program for sustainability recognition.

Anton Fomkin / Flickr

The City of Columbia has added a new resource to its website to help renters make an informed decision on where to live and to increase energy efficiency. The site now allows users to search past electric and water usage and rates for Columbia rental units.

Abigail Keel, ColumbiaFAVS.com

Three years ago, Larry Lile became his own boss. He started a consulting group that does energy audits of businesses and helps plan sustainable buildings.

His favorite part is the short walk to work: “I have about a 15-step walk to the office.”

But Lile also finds purpose in his work. Energy decisions, he said, are some of the most important issues we as a culture are making. He is dedicated helping businesses see that sustainable decisions are not only more ethical, but also economical. His personal life is proof of that.

Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

This is the latest installment of Harvest Public Media’s Field Notes, in which we talk about important issues related to food production.

Retailers and restaurants like Whole Foods, Chipotle, Safeway, McDonald's and Wal-Mart are all providing information to consumers about how sustainably some of their foods were produced. But as I found doing this story, it's hard to know just what "sustainability" means and how to judge whether food was produced in a "sustainable" way. 

Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Consumers are increasingly willing to pay more for foods they believe were sustainably produced, like free-range chicken, fair-trade coffee and pesticide-free wine. But what does “sustainable” actually mean?

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Inside a high tunnel at Berry Patch farm near Nevada, Iowa, strawberry baskets hang overhead and tomato plants stand tall already laden with fruit. Farm manager Lee Matteson picks several zucchini. Then, he stands there, holding the fresh squash while Will Weber, a sophomore environmental science student from Ames High School, takes a series of photographs.  Beside Weber, and holding another impressive-looking camera, Douglas Gayeton also takes pictures—and issues advice and suggestions to Weber.

Photo by William Powers / Harvest Network

Despite this being harvest season, I’ve been pestering farmers with theoretical questions about food and agriculture labels.

Here’s something I’ve learned: If there’s one thing to guarantee a lengthy conversation with an ag-minded person, regardless of his or her crop harvesting schedule, it might be on the farm labels.

I’ve also learned that there comes a point when slapping a pithy saying on an agricultural method is a detriment to understanding just how a farmer does his job.

This week: The front man for the band Guster leads a discussion on sustainability at MU, DESE is trying to become exempt from No Child Left Behind, and a new scholarship is available for students statewide.