Thinking Out Loud

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Twenty years ago, when Milton Rafferty republished Henry Rowe Schooclraft's 1820 Ozarks journal, Rafferty introduced the explorer Schooclraft to a new generation of scholars. Schoolcraft's journal is unique in that he describes flora and fauna in the pre-statehood Missouri Territory in a way that no one else had to date.


Churchill Clark

On a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris featured a preview of the upcoming Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre season and this weekend's canoe camp at Cooper's Landing.


Jim Harlan / MU Department of Geography

Henry Rowe Schooclraft explored the Ozarks in 1818 before many whites had settled the region. The journal he published the following year details what animals and plants he saw. Now, 200 years after Schoolcraft took the grand tour of southern Missouri by foot, we look at the forces that have altered the landscapes he saw. 


Farm Your Yard: Backyard Pollinators

May 1, 2016
The Xerxes Society

A couple of years ago I was harvesting mustard greens at the small urban farm where I work. I like to work steadily and efficiently, but there was something that totally derailed my task that day. Stuck to one of the leaves was a monarch butterfly chrysalis.  Have you ever seen something like that?

The State Historical Society of Missouri

In 1818, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft walked across the Ozarks. His curiosity and search for lead deposits are what drove him and travel companion Levi Pettibone to cover almost 900 miles in 90 days. Schoolcraft's journal recounted intact landscapes largely unmolested by humans. A new KBIA series looks at Schoolcraft's changing landscapes.


Alycia McGee / Cancer Research Center

On a recent Thinking out Loud, Darren Hellwege visited with Jack Bozarth and Alison Fea from Columbia's Cancer Research Center about the work that group is doing to better understand cancer.

  

This program originally aired April 5, 2016.

Listen for new episodes of Thinking Out Loud each Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. on KBIA.

Thomas Jefferson scholar Peter Onuf visited with KBIA's Darren Hellwege in advance of his visit to Columbia. Onuf is a regular contributor to BackStory as one of The History Guys.

Also on this week's program Darren talked with Columbian Nanette Ward about an April 22 event Freedom From Fashion that is a benefit for Ward's group, the Central Missouri Stop Human Trafficking Coalition.

This program was originally broadcast on March 29, 2016.

Listen for new episodes of Thinking Out Loud each Tuesday evening at 6:30 on KBIA 91.3FM.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

On this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege visited with City of Columbia Volunteer Coordinator Leigh Contwitz about the upcoming Clean-Up Columbia event and other volunteer opportunities. Trevor Harris also filed a story from the James Apartments about a local group working to salvage architectural elements from the 1903 structure before its planned demolition.

Last week, Thinking Out Loud’s Darren Hellwege attended the Poetry Out Loud competition, in which students from all over Mid-Missouri recited poems. Darren takes us to the competition and visits with a Hickman High School student who was the day’s winner.


Boone County Historical Society

If you ever visited Columbia's former Boone Tavern restaurant, you may have seen the many photos that lined the walls of the former downtown eatery. These images of historic Columbia, represent the photo collection assembled over many years by former restaurant owner Dick Walls. When Bleu Restaurant took over the space three years ago, the pictures of parades on brick streets and MU student revelry didn't really fit the new restaurant's aesthetic.

The State Historical Society of Missouri

Almost 200 years ago, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft and his travel companion Levi Pettibone set off on a walk. In the winter of 1818-1819, the two men walked and rode on horseback across 900 miles of hills and grasslands in what would soon become the state of Missouri. The landscapes they saw are - depending on who you talk with - either radically altered or barely changed.

Western Historical Manuscripts Collection

Chances are that if you studied English at the University of Missouri any time between the late 1950's and early 1980's, you met Thomas McAfee. A group of his former students are celebrating the late professor of poetry with a reissue of his poems.


Credit: Seth Barr

For over ten years, Thinking Out Loud has been a staple heard at 6:30 p.m. each Tuesday on KBIA. On this week's episode, producer Darren Hellwege shares selections from a decade of music and poetry performance as heard on Thinking Out Loud.

Credit: Mike Sleadd / www.michaelsleadd.com

How does one become Missouri's Poet Laureate? Darren finds out and hears some recent works from Boone County writer Walter Bargen.

Thinking Out Loud: Missouri's Folk Arts History

Apr 22, 2015
Trevor Harris / KBIA

This week on Thinking Out Loud, we bring you an intimate look into some of Missouri's oldest folk-art traditions: from blacksmithing, to jazz, to traditional song and dance.


Trevor Harris / KBIA

With a little work you can eat homegrown spinach, salad greens and carrots earlier than ever before with a low-cost cold frame. The Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture's Carrie Hargrove tells us how on this episode of Farm Your Yard.


Mizzou Magazine

In this program from our archives, we bring you a “Fridays At Mizzou” show in which Darren Hellwege participates in a program at the MU Law School designed to teach students about the process of Voir Dire, or selection of jurors for a trial. It’s an interesting look at how courts work, and educational programs at the School of Law here at the University of Missouri. From August, 2000.

Citizen Jane Film Festival

Seen any good movies by women lately? On this episode of KBIA's Thinking Out Loud, Darren Hellwege visits with Kerri Yost of the Citizen Jane Film Festival. This annual festival shines a spotlight on the work of female  filmmakers. Darren and Kerri discuss why women get overlooked in the world of movie-making, talk about some of this year’s featured films and preview some of the other events surrounding Citizen Jane. We also hear a report from Brady Finn of KBIA News talking about the festival with Paula Elias.


This week on Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris visited with staff and clients of the Columbia Center for  Urban Agriculture. The non-profit celebrates the 2014 growing season with their harvest Hootenanny this Saturday.

Facebook/Ruthie Mocchia

Have you ever been out on the Missouri River? If so, you know it is big, wide, and muddy. There's also litter in the river. Now, there's a lot less litter thanks to the work of Missouri River Relief. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, Trevor Harris talked with Melanie Cheney about why a cleaner Missouri River matters (Think drinking water.) Also, hear music from Violet Vonder Haar, who will be performing this Saturday's Boonville River Festival.


Trevor Harris / KBIA

Since 2000, Columbian Eduardo Crespi has run a community center called El Centro Latino. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with Crespi. KBIA's Trevor Harris also met some Columbia residents who were at the center on a recent Monday.


Trevor Harris/KBIA

Many people work behind the scenes to enliven Columbia's public access television channel, CAT-TV. This week KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with a handful of CAT founders, members and staff to find out how they use the medium of television to get their voices heard. Also on this week's program, Trevor talks with Peter Hatch, director of gardens and grounds at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home outside Charlottesville, Virginia. Hatch visited Columbia this week for a series of lectures celebration of the MU Botanic Garden's 15th anniversary.


Shane Epping/MU Disability Center

As thousands of students arrive in Columbia soon for the new school year, much work must happen behind the scenes to prepare. On this week's Thinking Out Loud host Darren Hellwege visits with a range of staff from University of Missouri departments whose work impacts and is impacted by the student experience at MU.


Trevor Harris/KBIA

From 1914 to 1954 if you were black in Kirksville you attended the segregated Lincoln School. In this episode of Thinking Out Loud hear voices of Lincoln School alumni Clyde Johnson and a handful of local residents who want to see the Lincoln School building preserved. Some local visionaries imagine the school as a 21st century educational center for all residents of Kirksville.

Brooke Hamilton/Grindstone Photography

Establishing a landscape rich in native plant species is a different process from putting in an annual planting of tomatoes and beans. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, Trevor Harris talked with Elizabeth Hamilton-Steele about the work that goes in to building a native landscape for yard or pasture.


Credit: www.umigarrett.com

What were you doing when you were thirteen? Umi Garrett is thirteen and she's possibly accomplished more than you and I put together had by that age. And then some. Garrett's been playing professionally since age eight. You can hear her perform this Saturday night when she joins the Missouri Symphony Orchestra at the Missouri Theatre for a concert the Missouri Symphony Society bills as Umi Returns


University of Missouri Press

If you are a creative type, then you may have given some thought to the process behind creating. Whether you paint, write essays or solve engineering problems, Columbia author William Least Heat-Moon has written a book that illuminates the creative process. Least Heat-Moon discussed his new book Writing Blue Highways on KBIA's Thinking Out Loud. He also speaks this Thursday at 7:00 p.m at the Daniel Boone Regional Library in Columbia.

Credit: Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre

On this weeks' Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with Quin Gresham, the Producing Artistic Director for the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre about the upcoming season at the theatre.

Credit: Marty Paten

When you first came to Columbia how did you arrive? Was it by car or bus? For several generations university and college students coming to Columbia almost entirely came by rail. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with a rider on the historic Wabash railroad into Columbia and the man who literally who wrote the book on the Columbia Branch Railroad.

Credit: Janet Moreland

On this episode of Thinking Out Loud, we meet a woman who took a historic kayak ride from the headwaters of the Missouri River to the Gulf of Mexico. In this week's first segment Janet Moreland shares the story of her ambitious summer 2013 trip. Plus, in this week's second segment, we hear about the Missouri River Cultural Conservancy and that group's May 2 fundraiser.


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