turkey

Travis McMillen/RJI

    

Journalists in Turkey and South Africa both work in countries with lively and well-established media. But in both countries, long-running single-party rule has led to challenges for reporters.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg talks about these issues and more with journalists from the two countries visiting the U.S. on fellowships from the Alfred Friendly Press Partners.  

AP

For months now, the world has watched as more than a million refugees and migrants from countries like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan have risked their lives to try and find safe haven in Europe.

But this influx has created enormous tensions in the European Union about how many newcomers to accept and which countries should take them. Governments in Sweden and Germany have each taken in hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants–and taken criticism both from other European states and their own people.

So, who foots the bill for settling the hundreds of thousands of immigrants? And if no one, where will these people go?


AP

  Turkish voters will go to the polls Nov. 1 amid a spasm of political violence and renewed conflict with Kurdish guerrillas. The vote also comes just weeks after the most deadly terrorist attack in Turkish history and as the army is struggling to keep the civil war in Syria from spilling over into Turkey.

Despite a government crackdown on independent media President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's ruling AKP party may struggle to win a parliamentary majority. On this week's edition of Global Journalist, we discuss Turkey's election and whether the country, once a democratic model in the Middle East, is sliding towards authoritarianism.

Bram Janssen / AP

With more than 30 million people spread across Turkey, Syria, Iraq and Iran, they are a minority everywhere they live.

Now Kurdish groups are battling both the Islamic State  and forces loyal to Bashar al-Assad as well as Turkey, a key U.S. ally. 

On this edition of Global Journalist: a deeper look at the role of the Kurds in the swirling conflicts of the Middle East.

Deported for a Tweet

Mar 27, 2015
AP/Today's Zaman

This week on Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg takes you around the world for a series of stories on the challenges of journalism in a rapidly changing world.

*Mahir Zeynalov, an Azerbaijani columnist for Turkey's Today's Zaman newspaper, speaks with Global Journalist's Jason McLure about being deported from Turkey for his Twitter use.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Since a highly contagious strain of bird flu was found in the U.S. in December, many countries have closed their doors to chickens and turkeys raised here.

The virus isn’t harmful to humans and, so far, only wild birds and backyard flocks have been infected. But commercial poultry farmers are worried because they have the most to lose.

by LarimdaME /Flickr Creative Commons

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — The St. Louis County chapter of the NAACP passed out Thanksgiving turkeys Thursday for those who lost jobs due to the rioting in Ferguson.

Censorship in Turkey

Oct 23, 2014
turkey protest
Emrah Gurel / AP Photo

  After 11 years as prime minister, Recip Tayyip Erdogan became Turkey's first directly-elected president in August. Under Erdogan’s tenure, Turkey’s economy has grown significantly. The country’s main minority group, the Kurds, have gained new rights. And a military with a history of meddling in politics has been kept in its barracks. But press freedom groups like Reporters Without Borders and the Committee to Protect Journalists have consistently criticized efforts by Erdogan’s AK Party to limit freedom of expression and of the press.

Associated Press

In Turkey, the daily clashes between demonstrators and police have grown into a protest movement. The uprising that defies comparison started modestly last week in the center of Istanbul. Environmentalists gathered in Taksim Square to protest against the government’s plan to pave over a small park.

Burhan Ozbilici / AP Images

Turkey portrays itself as the leading nation in an increasingly turbulent region of the world. The country that straddles Europe and the Middle East is a secular democracy with a thriving economy. It's also a member of NATO and a potential member of the European Union. 

bbum / Flickr

Missouri turkey hunters report taking nearly 8,500 birds last month, a 20 percent increase from October 2011.

Burhan Ozbilici / AP Images

Turkey stands at the world’s crossroads, both geographically and culturally. The country straddles the continents of Europe and Asia and is a contentious candidate for European Union membership.