us army corps of engineers

The Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers are talking about what’s best for the Bridgeton landfill and the World War II-era radioactive material stored at the neighboring West Lake landfill.

So says U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., who was among four Missouri members of Congress – two Republicans and two Democrats – who cosigned a recent letter asking the EPA to work with the Corps, which previously dealt with similar radioactive sites elsewhere in the St. Louis area.

River shore
File Photo / KBIA

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is picking up where it left off in clearing rock from barge channels in the Mississippi River.

Government shutdown affects some in mid-Mo.

Oct 1, 2013
Rusty_1 / Flickr

The government shutdown has affected some, but not all, federally-funded organizations in the area.

Medical Buildings

The Columbia Vet Center is operating regularly Tuesday despite the shutdown. The Center’s funds are appropriated ahead of time, meaning they did not lose any funding to the shutdown.

“Our funds are appropriated a year ahead of time so our 2014 fiscal year funds, which start today, were appropriated last year,” Acting Team Leader  Shawn Martin said.

Missouri River at Rocheport
File Photo / KBIA

Nearly a dozen Missouri agriculture groups sent a letter to Governor Jay Nixon this week calling for his support to oppose a dredging project in the Missouri River.

The project – near Arrow Rock, Missouri – was set up several years ago to create a shallow water habitat for several fish species including the pallid sturgeon – an endangered fish. Under the US Army Corps of Engineers plan, the soil excavated from the site would be deposited into the Missouri River.

It seems like we’re constantly hearing about how the worst drought in decades is threatening barge shipping on the Mississippi River. 

One day we’re facing a shutdown, the next day they say commerce will keep rolling on the river.  

Here’s the latest: The Army Corp of Engineers says it’s done enough work to keep the waterway open until the end of this month.   

After that, though, no one is making any promises, and that uncertainty is giving the shipping industry a lingering headache and could end up with local companies cutting jobs.   

Army Corps moves forward on scheduled rock blasting

Dec 18, 2012
Jacob McCleland / KRCU

The Army Corps of Engineers will begin blasting Mississippi River rock outcrops later today, and the rocks could impede barge traffic south of Cape Girardeau near Thebes, Illinois.

Corps officials originally planned to start this work in late January. Instead, they began this weekend. Contractors are already scraping off the tops of the underwater rocks. Today, they will drill holes and fill them with explosives, according to spokesperson Mike Peterson.

Christine Karim / Creative Commons

The US Army Corps of Engineers this week began shutting flow from a South Dakota reservoir which feeds into Mississippi River, just north of St. Louis. The overall lack of water is expected to cause big problems moving freight on the river.

File / KBIA

Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt and North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven plan to make their own inspections of dams and levees along the Missouri River.

File / KBIA

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is seeking dismissal of a lawsuit brought on behalf of more than 140 southeast Missouri farmers over damage caused by last year's intentional breach of the Birds Point levee at the height of spring flooding.

Tech. Sgt. Oscar Sanchez USDA / Flickr

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced Monday that it’s changing its short-term approach to managing water levels on the Missouri River, following devastating flooding this summer in Missouri, Iowa and North Dakota.