us supreme court

Updated at 7:03 a.m. ET Friday:

After an appeals court put Wisconsin's voter ID law back into effect, the Supreme Court voted to put the law on hold while the justices decide whether to take the case.

Marge Pitrof of Milwaukee's WUWM reports:

Just a few words can hold a world of meaning. John Paul Stevens, the retired Supreme Court justice, has written a short new book in which he proposes a few words here and there that would create some sweeping changes.

The book, Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, details the half-dozen ways Stevens thinks the Constitution could be improved, changes that he says are worth the trouble of the arduous amendment process.

prison cell
mikecogh / Flickr

More than 80 Missourians are serving sentences of life without parole that the U.S. Supreme Court says are unconstitutional because they were juveniles at the time of their crime.

classroom
Håkan Dahlström / Flickr

A recent southwest Missouri high school graduate and his family have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review whether drug searches in high schools violate the Fourth Amendment rights of students against unlawful search and seizure.

Brian Turner / Flickr

The Supreme Court is considering whether police must get a warrant before ordering a blood test on an unwilling drunken-driving suspect.

The justices heard arguments Wednesday in a case involving a disputed blood test from Missouri. Police stopped a speeding, swerving car and the driver, who had two previous drunken-driving convictions, refused to submit to a breath test to measure the alcohol level in his body.

Mo. drunk driving case headed to U.S. Supreme Court

Sep 26, 2012
WallyG / FLICKR

A Cape Girardeau drunk driving case is going all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The court will decide if police can give a blood test without a warrant.

After Tyler McNeely failed a field sobriety check and refused the breath test, a Missouri State Highway Patrol Officer took him to hospital where he had a blood test.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Eastern Missouri represents McNeely. Legal director Tony Rothert says the officer infringed upon McNeely’s fourth amendment protection from unreasonable search by drawing his blood without a warrant.

As part yesterday's Supreme Court decision on Obama's health care law, the justices ruled the federal government can't revoke states' Medicaid funding for failing to comply with the law's required Medicaid  expansion. And as Véronique LaCapra reports, that could leave some Missourians without access to health insurance.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The U.S. Supreme Court upheld most of the federal health care law in a ruling this morning. Among Missouri officials, and on the streets of downtown Columbia this afternoon, reaction was mixed.

Immigrant advocacy groups in Missouri say that while they are pleased the US Supreme Court struck down most of a controversial Arizona immigration policy, they remain concerned about a provision that had the support of the justices.

The five-to-three ruling on Monday allowed Arizona law enforcement officials to check the papers of anyone they suspect is in the country illegally. Opponents say that will lead to biased policing.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

In the next few days, the U.S. Supreme Court will rule on the constitutionality of the federal health care law. Even if the court upholds the law, one key component will be under fire here in Missouri come November. On the ballot will be a measure targeting the law's required online marketplaces, or health insurance exchanges, where individuals and small businesses can buy plans. 

chris koster
File photo / KBIA

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster wants the U.S. Supreme Court to reject an individual health insurance mandate but uphold other parts of the federal health care law.