veto session

In this episode of Talking Politics, Professor Mark Horvit explains what’s in store for Missouri lawmakers as they meet for their annual veto session this week. Mark Horvit is a professor at the Missouri School of Journalism and leads the school’s state government reporting program.

Of all the vetoed bills, one of the most talked about is a measure that would fix funding cuts to in-home and nursing home care for seniors.


Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

 Gun control advocates and gun rights supporters are fanning out through the Missouri Capitol, lobbying lawmakers on a bill that would allow most people to carry concealed weapons without needing permits.

Missouri lawmakers are to consider Wednesday whether to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of the high-profile legislation.

The National Rifle Association set up shop in the Rotunda between the House and Senate and dispatched scores of volunteers to talk to lawmakers in support of the legislation. The organization distributed signs saying, "NRA. Stand and Fight."

David Shane / Flickr

  Missouri lawmakers have overridden Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of a measure to require voters to present photo identification at the polls.

The Republican-led Legislature overturned the Democratic governor's veto Wednesday after GOP senators forced an end to debate.

Lawmakers' action is the first step to enact the policy in the state. Voters on Nov. 8 also must vote to amend the Missouri Constitution to allow for a photo identification law in order for the policy to be enacted.

That's needed because the Missouri Supreme Court has previously found voter photo ID laws to be unconstitutional.

NAACP Vows to Fight Voter ID if Veto Overturned

Sep 14, 2016
Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Republicans will likely take a big step forward Wednesday in what has been a 10-year battle to pass voter identification legislation in Missouri.

The bill would require Missouri voters to present some form of photo identification at the polls in order to vote. Voters could also present a non-photo ID, but would be required to sign a document affirming their identity and be required to sign up for a state-funded government issued ID.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

  Democratic Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says he's "optimistic" some of his vetoes will be sustained when the Republican-led Legislature considers overrides next week.

Nixon made his case against more than 20 vetoed bills to reporters Wednesday at the Capitol in advance of the annual veto session.

Republicans have enough members in both chambers to override vetoes.

Nixon's vetoes of a sweeping guns bill and a photo identification requirement for voters at the polls have gotten the most attention.

vote here sign
KBIA file photo

  Governor Jay Nixon continues to criticize legislation that would require Missouri voters to show photo ID’s at the polls. Nixon, a Democrat, vetoed the bill earlier this year, but the Republican-controlled legislature is expected to try an override attempt during veto session two weeks from now. He told reporters yesterday that the state shouldn’t be making it harder for people to vote. 

Missouri's Republican-led Legislature will be meeting to consider overriding more than a dozen vetoes made by Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon, including several on bills affecting workers' paychecks.

Updated 4:32 p.m., Sept. 16 with vote The Republican push to bring "right to work" to Missouri failed in a 96-63 vote in the Missouri House. Up until the veto session started it was unknown whether Republicans legislative leaders would attempt the override. As it was, the GOP picked up four votes and fell short of the 109 needed to counter Gov. Jay Nixon's clear stand against the measure.

House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, says that a final decision on whether to bring up House Bill 116 could be decided right before the noon start.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Enough Missouri senators appear to support an unemployment bill to vote to overturn Democratic Governor Jay Nixon's veto. 

From looking at the raw numbers, Republican legislators might consider the Missouri General Assembly’s recent veto session a smashing success.

After all, the Republican-controlled body overrode 10 of Gov. Jay Nixon’s vetoes – and even more of his line-item vetoes. Nixon even faced a blistering condemnation from a Democratic senator over his response to Ferguson.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

  JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Gov. Jay Nixon has released $143 million of education funding that he had frozen, because lawmakers sustained most of his vetoes of tax-break bills.

Nixon announced the release of the money Thursday, after lawmakers concluded a veto session in which they overrode 47 line-item budget vetoes and 10 vetoes on other bills.

(Updated 12:15 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 11)

The Missouri General Assembly has made the state the third in the country to require a 72-hour waiting period before a woman can obtain an abortion, after the state Senate killed off a filibuster.

The Senate voted 23-7 – along party lines -- to override Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of the bill, but only after deploying a procedural action that it hadn’t used in seven years to end a Democratic filibuster that had gone on for about two hours.

Missouri residents who have concealed-carry permits will be able to openly carry their firearms anywhere in the state, as a result of the General Assembly decision to override Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of a broad gun-rights bill.

The bill prevents municipalities from barring people from openly carrying firearms, lowers the minimum age to 19 for concealed carry permits in the state, and allows school districts to arm teachers. Police officers also will be barred from disarming people unless they are under arrest.

(Updated 8:35 p.m., Wed., Sept. 10)

The Missouri House and Senate have voted overwhelmingly to override Gov. Jay Nixon’s line-item vetoes of more than 50 items in the state's current budget, although both sides agree the overrides may not be enforceable.

The House spent more than six hours dealing with the issues. The Senate swiftly followed suit with a barrage of votes Wednesday night.

Jonny Williams / Flickr

Of the numerous items Missouri legislators will consider during this veto session, Senate Bill 841 has state health advocates paying attention. The bill's main purpose was to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors. But these good intentions may have led lawmakers astray.

This week's edition of Politically Speaking is fully focused on Wednesday's veto session. St. Louis Public Radio's Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcomed state Rep. Caleb Jones, R-Boone County, to our St. Louis studio to tell us what to expect. 

Missouri House of Representatives

A St. Louis lawmaker provided a couple of key votes to override vetoes of bills on which her son had recently been hired as a lobbyist.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including continuing coverage of the Missouri General Assembly's veto session.

During the start of the legislature's veto session today, the Missouri House of Representatives failed to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto on House Bill 253, a contentious bill that would have lowered income taxes. Critics of the bill alleged that the tax cuts would send the state into debt.

The vote had 94 votes in favor to 67 against, but 109 votes were needed to override the veto. As a result of the vote, the Senate will not consider overriding Gov. Nixon's veto.

The showdown between Missouri's Democratic Governor and the Republican-led General Assembly finally arrives this week, as lawmakers return to Jefferson City for their annual veto session.  Governor Jay Nixon struck down 29 bills this year, with most of the post-veto attention falling on two bills in particular, a controversial tax cut proposal and an even more controversial attempt to nullify federal gun control laws.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin takes a look at what may or may not happen on Wednesday.

Dan Verbeck / KBIA

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is raising concerns about legislation attempting to nullify some federal gun-control laws.

Koster sent a letter Tuesday (.pdf) to lawmakers warning that the bill contains "flawed public policy."

The Republican-led Legislature is to meet Sept. 11 to consider overriding Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of the legislation.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA file photo

Governor Jay Nixon says a clause in the income tax cut bill he vetoed could have triggered a $1.2 billion run on the state treasury because the cuts could apply retroactively to the last 3 years.

Attorney General Chris Koster agreed with Nixon's legal analysis this past week, as Republicans consider overriding the veto. But the dollar amount projection remains largely hypothetical.

The Missouri bill would trigger a one-half of a percent reduction in state income tax rates if the federal government enacts a measure making it easier for states to collect online sales taxes. That bill has stalled in the U.S. House.

So far, there has not been a ground swell of support for the idea of a special legislative session in Missouri to pass an alternate version of the tax cut bill vetoed earlier this year by Governor Jay Nixon (D).

Updated 8-21-13 4:01 p.m.

In St. Louis Wednesday, Gov. Jay Nixon sharply criticized a bill he vetoed that would allow juvenile sexual offenders to be removed from the sex offender registry. The Democratic Governor said overriding his veto would undermine public safety and weaken victims' rights.

He stood next to a gallery of mugshots and distributed information on several individuals who could be removed from the website if the bill passes.

Expect to see a lot of ads leading up to September, paid for largely by one man. Libertarian Rex Sinquefield has given nearly $2.4 million to groups backing a possible cut to Missouri's income tax.

In response, Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has gone on the offensive, attacking the income tax bill and defending his veto.

hitthatswitch / flickr

Governor Jay Nixon’s veto of anti-contraceptive coverage bill has been overridden by both the Missouri House and Senate.

Missouri capitol
David Shane / Flickr

Lawmakers return to Jefferson City Wednesday for their annual veto session.  House and Senate leaders will attempt to override Governor Nixon’s veto of a bill that levies sales taxes on out-of-state vehicle purchases.

Newscast for September 11, 2012

Sep 11, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • FARM-PAC reaffirming endorsement for US Senate candidate Todd Akin
  • Missouri's veto session set for tomorrow
  • Attorneys for American Civil Liberties Union seeking a temporary junction to block "house of worship" law
  • Final meeting for response to natural disasters
  • Boone County offering free flu immunizations for children

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