Views

American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times. Also, why NBC insists on mispronouncing Pyeongchang, how high school journalists shifted the narrative in Parkland, Fla. and why a Seattle station spent $12,000 to forgive $1 million in viewers’ debt.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times.

Sinclair Broadcast Group has asked its news directors to consider donating personal funds to the company’s political action committee to help fund its lobbying efforts. Is it a conflict of interest to pay to lobby the leaders you’re covering? Also, coverage of the Winter Games from PyeongChang, Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s stay in the Celebrity Big Brother House and why a missing comma could get costly quickly. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Brett Johnson and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

It’s prime time for moviegoers, gearing up for the Academy Awards at the end of the month. Many of them are seeing as many films as they want for only $10 a month thanks to a new subscription service called MoviePass. How does it work and why are movie chains so against it? Also, Newsweek’s senior management fired in what might have been an act of retaliation, Tronc sells the Los Angeles Times and why the Las Vegas Review-Journal spiked a story about allegations of sexual misconduct against casino magnate Steve Wynn’s two decades ago. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Sarah_Ackerman

It’s prime time for moviegoers, gearing up for the Academy Awards at the end of the month. Many of them are seeing as many films as they want for only $10 a month thanks to a new subscription service called MoviePass. How does it work and why are movie chains so against it? 

President Trump delivered his first State of the Union address last night. Was it effective? We'll discuss. Facebook says it's going to increase the number of local news stories in your feed. How exactly will that work? Plus: Twitter bots, the Pope's take on fake news and a look at the news organizations that are being credited for exposing sexual abuse by U.S. Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas. Views of the News.

Think you’ve spotted fake news? Feel like you need to report it to someone? In Italy, news consumers are being asked to report fake news to a police agency who will fact check it, and if need be set the record straight. It might limit misinformation, but what effect might it have on freedom of the press? Also, coverage of the government shutdown, Rupert Murdoch’s suggestion that Facebook should pay publishers carriage fees like cable companies do the networks and the HuffPost ditches the model that’s defined it for years. 

At least one Republican lawmaker is calling for Gov. Eric Greitens to resign following reports of an extramarital affair. Greitens denies details in a KMOV-TV report that he photographed the woman without her consent and used them to blackmail her. The station’s reporting is salacious and scandalous, but it is news? Does the public’s right to know about their elected officials’ behavior outweigh an individual’s right to privacy? Also, coverage of sexual misconduct accusations against Actor Aziz Ansari take a very different tone, President Trump’s use of language and drastic changes to the Facebook algorithm. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

At least one Republican lawmaker is calling for Gov. Eric Greitens to resign following reports of an extramarital affair. Greitens denies details in a KMOV-TV report that he photographed the woman without her consent and used them to blackmail her. The station’s reporting is salacious and scandalous, but it is news? Does the public’s right to know about their elected officials’ behavior outweigh an individual’s right to privacy? 

What happens when the president’s attorney’s try to block the publication of a White House tell-all? Sales go through the roof, of course… and buzz on television and radio gets louder and louder, quite literally. Where Wolff’s reporting techniques sound? Did the president’s surrogates hurt argument that anecdotes weren’t accurate? Also, how rumors of Oprah Winfrey’s 2020 presidential run made news, why the BBC’s China editor resigned her post, and a new publisher at the Columbia Daily Tribune. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What happens when the president’s attorney’s try to block the publication of a White House tell-all? Sales go through the roof, of course… and buzz on television and radio gets louder and louder, quite literally. Where Wolff’s reporting techniques sound? Did the president’s surrogates hurt argument that anecdotes weren’t accurate?

Michael Wolff, NY Magazine: “Donald Trump didn’t want to be president”

Doug Jones defeated Roy Moore in yesterday’s special election for Alabama’s open senate seat. It’s a huge win for Jones… but how big of a win is it for journalists? Also Gov. Greitens’ use of a secret messaging app, former Gawker employees seek to buy back the bankrupt gossip site and MSNBC rehires a contributor fired after some sexually suggestive tweets. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Photo by Amy Simons

Five students from the University of Missouri's Honors College participated in a 16-week tutorial under the direction of Missouri School of Journalism professor Amy Simons on media criticism during the Fall 2017 term. For their final project, the students produced and hosted their own special edition of KBIA-FM's program, "Views of the News."

Brian Ross has long been regarded as one of the best investigative reporters in the business, but Friday’s fact error regarding Michael Flynn’s guilty plea created big problems for ABC. The network has suspended him for four weeks. But, to what end? Also, NBC after Matt Lauer, Time Magazine’s Person of the Year and what’s next for net neutrality. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via

Brian Ross has long been regarded as one of the best investigative reporters in the business, but Friday’s fact error regarding Michael Flynn’s guilty plea created big problems for ABC. The network has suspended him for four weeks. But, to what end? 

They were once two of America's most trusted broadcasters. Today Matt Lauer and Garrison Keillor are both out of a job following allegations of sexual misconduct in the workplace. Also, dogged reporting at the Washington Post roots out someone trying to scam reporters, the New York Times’ feature on a Nazi sympathizer draws deep criticism and Time Magazine’s new owners. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The network notified Lauer of it's decision late Tuesday night after an investigation into claims of 'inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace.'  Keillor notified the Associated Press of his firing in an email to the agency. 

Is the media stirring the pot? Is the coverage of the sex scandals – now rocking entertainment, journalism and politics – potentially destroying innocent lives? In our attempts to listen to and be supportive of accusers are we denying the accused due process or benefit of the doubt? We’ll debate. Also, Donald Trump Jr.’s communication with WikiLeaks, why the New York Times is suing a woman who identified herself as one of the paper’s reporters and Simpsons’ fans, it’s time to talk about Apu. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

Is the media stirring the pot? Is the coverage of the sex scandals – now rocking entertainment, journalism and politics – potentially destroying innocent lives? In our attempts to listen to and be supportive of accusers are we denying the accused due process or benefit of the doubt? 

Covering the sexual assault and harassment scandals rocking the entertainment world hasn’t been easy for many journalists, but it’s even harder when the accusations fly within your own organization. Also, what prompted a billionaire to shutter the Gothamist and DNAInfo hyperlocal news sites, why Disney shut out the LA Times, and YouTube’s algorithm serves violent videos to children. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Did 21st Century Fox renew Bill O’Reilly’s contract soon after he settled a sexual harassment suit for more than $32 million – six months after founder Roger Ailes’ ouster? A New York Times report says so. Also, CNN puts facts first using an apple, why ESPN canceled “Barstool Van Talk” after only one episode and how the ethics of covering the apprehension of a potentially suicidal person. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Justin Hoch

Did 21st Century Fox renew Bill O’Reilly’s contract soon after he settled a sexual harassment suit for more than $32 million – six months after founder Roger Ailes’ ouster? A New York Times report says so.

Emily Steel & Michael S. Schmidt, New York Times: “O’Reilly settled new harassment claim, then Fox renewed his contract

Harvey Weinstein remains in rehab undergoing treatment for a sex addiction while his peers expel him from the Motion Picture Academy and the Producers Guild and his company crumbles financially. Meanwhile, NBC execs deny claims they quashed a reporter’s work on the story and football commentator jokes on Sunday Night Football. We’ll break down the developments in the Weinstein saga. Also, President Donald Trump’s threat to go after broadcast licenses, why the New York Times felt a need to update its social media policy and why it’s so hard for some people to ad lib on TV. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? Also, ESPN suspends Jemele Hill after another violation of the network’s social media policy, Dove apologizes for a racially insensitive promotion and Facebook has a plan for fact checking. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? 

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, New York Times: “Harvey Weinstein paid off sexual harassment accusers for decades

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. Also, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg acknowledges the platform’s advertising practices are flawed, Megyn Kelly’s ‘Today’ debut, and interactions between reporters and police during the ongoing protests in St. Louis. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Keith Allison

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. 

Emmy host Stephen Colbert invites former White House press secretary Sean Spicer to appear on stage at last Sunday's ceremony. Who wasn't in on the joke? Was Harvard "behaving stupidly" when it rescinded an invitation to Chelsea Manning to become a visiting fellow? Also, reactions by ESPN management after Jemele Hill speaks out against #Trump; and will Ken Burns' latest documentary about the #VietnamWar attract an audience beyond the baby boomers who lived through it? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey. KBIA 91.3 FM

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? Also, the ethics of undercover reporting, why the Department of Justice wants some RT associates to register as foreign agents, and Disney’s attempt to bring back the Mickey Mouse Club – or should we say Club Mickey Mouse. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

CNN's Patrick Oppmann reports on Hurricane Irma from Cuba.
Courtesy CNN

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? 

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