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What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag. Also, covering the death Fidel Castro and some pretty shallow coverage of the standoff at the Standing Rock Reservation. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag.

We’re learning the names of some of President-elect Trump’s first appointments. How should the news media cover those? And, when do you use terms like “alt-right” versus “white nationalist?” Also, Mark Zuckerberg’s response to the notion the spread of fake news on Facebook affected the outcome of the election, nonprofit news organizations see a rush of donations, and the death of Gwen Ifill. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy CBS

We’re learning the names of some of President-elect Trump’s first appointments. How should the news media cover those? And, when do you use terms like “alt-right” versus “white nationalist?”

Leslie Stahl, 60 Minutes: “President-elect Trump speaks to a divided country on 60 Minutes

Forget the pollsters, forget the prognosticators, forget the pundits.

They were all wrong.

Now that the election is behind us, our panel breaks down what happened in America’s newsrooms – how the coverage came together and where so many natural storylines were dropped. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

After a few tough weeks for Donald Trump and his campaign, we’ll look at a few issues that have put a thorn in Hillary Clinton’s side. Also, the exchange between Megyn Kelly and Newt Gingrich, Gannett drops its bid for Tronc, racist advertising practices on Facebook and the end of Twitter’s Vine. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Advertising on Facebook? You have the option to target your ad to reach the audience YOU want to reach. But, what happens when your choices could constitute breaking the law?

Julia Angwin & Terry Parris, Jr., ProPublica: “Facebook lets advertisers exclude users by race

Gillian B. White, The Atlantic: “How Facebook’s ad tool fails to protect civil rights

The closer we get to Election Day, the hotter the rhetoric gets. We rely on our news media to cut through the clutter and put it all into context. But, where do the opinions end and the true reporting begin?

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Rod Gelatt and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user justgrimes

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air.

The New York Times: “The New York Times lawyer responds to Donald Trump

Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations? Also, we’ll break down the first presidential debate, the coverage, the focus on fact-checking and Lester Holt’s performance as moderator. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Photo by Amy Simons (KBIA)

Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations?

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden? Also, have we seen the end of the birther movement, Megyn Kelly’s new role of producer,and how a journalist’s skills could be used to teach life skills.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy Prixas Films via Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden?

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people? Was there ever any doubt that Donald Trump’s interview with Larry King would end up on Vladimir Putin’s RT network? Also, what pressure did Matt Lauer’s performance during a candidate forum put on future debate moderators? Facebook’s about face on censoring an iconic photo from the Vietnam War, the role of the local gossip columnist. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people?

Callum Borchers, Washington Post: “Conservative media – and NPR – entertain the possibility of a Hillary Clinton replacement

It's been two months since former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed her sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News. Now, the network has announced a settlement – and it’s disclosing the details. Also, what’s the role of a debate moderator and the shortest story in the history of the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Image courtesy of Fox News Channel

It's been two months since former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed her sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News. Today, the network announced a settlement.

Erik Wemple, Washington Post: “Fox News has settled Gretchen Carlson’s sexual harassment suit for $20 million

  The Associated Press reports that more than half of the meetings Hillary Clinton held during her time as Secretary of State were with parties who donated to the Clinton Foundation. Is their analysis an accurate representation of the data? Also, what happened when Facebook dropped its Trending Topics team, a USA Today report that gives some credence to Ryan Lochte’s story and a career development initiative designed to bring diverse candidates to newsrooms across the country. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

The Associated Press reports that more than half of the meetings Hillary Clinton held during her time as Secretary of State were with parties who donated to the Clinton Foundation. Is their analysis an accurate representation of the data?

Jeff Jarvis: “Specimens of old journalism

For years, WikiLeaks has been known for it’s crusade against government secrecy. But, the Associated Press reports that innocent, private citizens have had very personal information published online. Why would the agency publish medical record, name child rape victims or out gay men in Saudi Arabia? Also, another major shakeup in the Trump campaign, the end of Gawker, and Ryan Lochte’s fall from grace. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

For years, WikiLeaks has been known for it’s crusade against government secrecy. But, the Associated Press reports that innocent, private citizens have had very personal information published online. Why would the agency publish medical record, name child rape victims or out gay men in Saudi Arabia?

Raphael Satter & Maggie Michael, Associated Press: “Private lives exposed as WikiLeaks spills its secrets

John Oliver summed it up succinctly on Sunday night’s episode of Last Week Tonight, “the media is a food chain which would fall apart without local newspapers.” We’ll talk about Oliver’s harsh words for the content creators and why so many reporters and editors are cheering him on. Also, a look of the best –and the worst – of the coverage of the Olympic games in Rio and Fox News after Roger Ailes. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


John Oliver summed it up succinctly on Sunday night’s episode of Last Week Tonight, “the media is a food chain which would fall apart without local newspapers.” We’ll talk about Oliver’s harsh words for the content creators and why so many reporters and editors are cheering him on.

The Hill, The Atlantic and POLITICO are among the news organizations offering sponsorship opportunities for events at the Republican and Democratic National Conventions later this month. In many cases, special interests are footing the bill. Is it a conflict of interest or creative way to create and alternative revenue stream… or both? Also, the influence ‘Serial’ might have had in getting Adnan Syed a new trial, why PBS used video from a past fireworks show Monday night, and how Facebook’s new algorithm may hurt publishers. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Matt Stoller

The Hill, The Atlantic and POLITICO are among the news organizations offering sponsorships opportunities for events at the Republican and Democratic National Conventions later this month. In many cases, special interests are footing the bill. Is it a conflict of interest or creative way to create and alternative revenue stream… or both?

Lee Fang, The Intercept: “Major political news outlets offer interviews for sale at DNC and RNC conventions

Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski is CNN’s newest political analyst, offering insight and analysis into his former employer. Why did the cable network plop down $500,000 to bring him on board? How will non-disclosure agreements affect his ability to offer insights? And, does that hurt CNN’s credibility? Also, live streaming the House sit-in using social media apps, covering the Brexit vote and a reporter’s undercover reporting inside a for-profit prison. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Image via Wikimedia Commons

Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski is CNN’s newest political analyst, offering insight and analysis into his former employer. Why did the cable network plop down $500,000 to bring him on board? How will non-disclosure agreements affect his ability to offer insights? And, does that hurt CNN’s credibility?

As with so many mass shootings in this country, the events at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub raised many questions about access to guns, terrorism, radicalized Islam – and homophobia. But now critics are questioning whether a journalist’s sexual orientation or gender identity may influence their ability to cover the story fairly. Is that criticism fair? Also, the FAA relaxes regulations on commercial drone use, Disney’s coverage of Disney, and Donald Trump’s decision to pull the Washington Post’s credentials. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

As with so many mass shootings in this country, the events at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub raised many questions about access to guns, terrorism, radicalized Islam – and homophobia. But now critics are questioning whether a journalist’s sexual orientation or gender identity may influence their ability to cover the story fairly. Is that criticism fair?

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