Views

Do you want to know about every person tested for Ebola or hear about every airline passenger with a fever? Has the media’s attempts to localize the Ebola epidemic gone too far, resulting in the reporting of “non-stories?” New Jersey puts NBC Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Synderman under a mandatory quarantine after she was spotted picking up soup from her favorite restaurant. Speculation swirls after North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un reappears after 40 days without a trace and the New York Times says it’s time to end the trade embargo against Cuba – in Spanish. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

NBC Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman and the team she worked with in Liberia are now under a mandatory quarantine ordered by the New Jersey Health Department.

On last week's Views of the News, we talked about how Synderman was self-monitoring and in isolation after being exposed to Ebola by cameraman Ashoka Mukpo.

    The Ebola outbreak hits American soil.  A photojournalist working for NBC News is treated for the illness while his colleagues are in a self-imposed quarantine.  Did the Liberian man doctors diagnosed in Dallas have an expectation of privacy? Or should the media have broadcast his name far and wide?    Daily Show alum John Oliver says he’s not a journalist, but many journalists disagree. Find out why his brand of investigative reporting is getting the industry’s attention. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jim Flink and Jamie Greber: Views of the News.

Courtesy NIAID

The diagnoses of two high-profile cases of Ebola have changed how the media is covering the viral outbreak in the United States. 

A freelance photojournalist working for NBC News said he started to feel symptoms a few days after joining the crew.  He's back in the United States, and his prognosis is reportedly good.  His colleagues -- NBC employees -- are home, too, in self-quarantined for a period of 21 days.

  Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards. How do you keep the trolls from invading your news site’s smart, open dialogue? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: a special edition of Views of the News.


via Twitter

Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards.

The psychology of web trolling

    

  Advertisers are starting to feel pressure to drop their NFL sponsorships in light of how the league is handling domestic abuse cases. What role has the news media played in that?  Also, the Columbia Missourian fact-checks the “Mizzou Made” commercial, and some emotional moments in local television news. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

There is pressure on the big-name sponsors of the National Football League to pull their advertising dollars in the aftermath of the domestic abuse scandal.  The public has joined the chant, calling attention to Cover Girl cosmetics (left) for its "Game Face" campaign, using manipulated images of made-up women with bruises on their face.  How has the news media contributed to the discussion?

The Baltimore Ravens cut Ray Rice after TMZ releases graphic video of him assaulting his now-wife in a hotel elevator, six months after the incident. How did media pressure play into the decision? NBC re-launches “Meet the Press” with Chuck Todd at the helm, Bloomberg News fails to cover the return of it’s CEO, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and why another new reporting fellowship the Huffington Post has some journalism purists raising an eyebrow. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Keith Allison / Flickr

More than six months ago, Ray Rice was caught on surveillance video beating his then-fiancee unconscious in an Atlantic City hotel elevator.   In July, the National Football League disciplined Rice for the incident, suspending him from the first two regular season games.

Throughout the summer, the league came under heavy criticism in the press.  Activists, reporters and columnists came down hard on the NFL for having stiffer penalties for players charged with illegal drug use. 

Video claims to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff.  How big of a gaffe was it when President Barack Obama said he doesn’t “have a strategy yet” for dealing with ISIS in Syria? Should reporters name names when saying they’ve experienced boorish behavior at the hands of U.S. senators? And, the steps the St. Louis media is taking to keep the story of Ferguson on the front page. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

via SITE

A video released by the militant group ISIS appears to show the beheading of American journalist Steven J. Sotloff, 31.  The freelance reporter was taken captive while reporting on the bloody civil war in Syria last year.  Sotloff is the second American journalist slain by ISIS militants in two weeks in retaliation for military strikes against the group.

An editorial cartoon in the Columbia Daily Tribune sparks cries of racism from readers, the Huffington Post names a new “Ferguson Fellow” to spend a year looking into how the St. Louis County police department got its military-grade equipment, and a young journalist speaks out on why it’s time step out of Ferguson and let the region heal.  Also, how Facebook comments led a cops reporter to quit and a police chief to lose his job, why CNN will soon be doing less with less and ESPN’s reporting on Michael Sam’s shower habits. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

More than a ten journalists have been arrested, dozens more tear gassed trying to cover the violence in Ferguson, Missouri.  Governor Jay Nixon lost control of a nationally televised news conference, and cable news anchors turn into advocates on-screen.  What role is the media playing in the continuing conflict? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

So much has happened in Ferguson, Missouri.  Nearly a dozen reporters have been arrested while on the job.  We've learned the identity of Michael Brown's shooter: six-year police veteran Darren Wilson. St. Louis NBC-affiliate KSDK-TV aired video of his home.  Governor Jay Nixon instituted -- and lifted -- curfews and called in the Missouri National Guard.

And we saw it all live -- online, on air and in print.

Police in Ferguson, Missouri shot and killed an unarmed teen.  Was race a factor in the death of Michael Brown? Or has the framing of the story by local and national journalists made it one?  Also, keeping reporters safe during violent protests, the role of citizen journalists and hashtag activism in the aftermath. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: Views of the News.


Courtesy CNN

A police officer Ferguson, Missouri fatally shot an unarmed teen.  Was race a factor in the death of Michael Brown? Or has the framing of the story by local and national journalists made it one?  Also, keeping reporters safe during violent protests, the role of citizen journalists and hashag activism in the aftermath.

The New York Times

  The New York Times this week ran a series of editorials calling on the federal government to repeal the ban on marijuana.  A brave, game-changing move that shows the country's leading newspaper acting like one, or just another sign of how behind public opinion the mainstream media are these days?  And what difference will it make?

The Editorial Board, The New York Times, "Repeal Prohibition, Again"

Strange theories abound following the shootdown of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. What impact is that having on the people of Russia? Rupert Murdoch makes a bid for Time Warner. What does that mean for the future of corporate media? And Jill Abramson has been making the rounds, speaking with several prominent women journalists, but have they been going easy on her? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Judd Slivka and Stacey Woelfel discuss these issues and more on this edition of Views of the News.

Roman Boed / Flickr

  While Western media have for days been focusing on Russian-backed separatists as the culprits behind the missile attack on MH 17 over eastern Ukraine, the people of Russia have been hearing different stories from their government-controlled media.

The first-ever gay pride event at Fort Leonard Wood: Is it newsworthy or not?  When you know your local readership isn’t likely to respond to the story does that mean you skip covering it? Also, Matt Lauer accused of sexism, a Facebook experiment preys on your emotions, and whether a relatively common television news practice is standard operating procedure or plagiarism. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Amanda Hinnant and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

  

U.S. Army photo

On Monday, the first-ever gay pride event was held on post at Fort Leonard Wood. Command Sgt. Major Teresa King spoke at a luncheon about her journey coming out and living openly as a gay soldier in the U.S. Army.

Some would say that this is news. It's not that long ago that such an event on an military post would have been illegal. Others say there are diversity events held all the time celebrating one group or another, and it deserved no more coverage than those do.

A big week in legal news, as the U.S. Supreme Court decides on the Aereo case, verdicts are announced in the News of the World phone-hacking scandal and three Al Jazeera journalists are sentenced to more than seven years in an Egyptian prison. Also, Sen. Claire McCaskill takes on Dr. Oz, the St. Louis-Post Dispatch drops George Will, and hottest felon ever? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

via Jeff Weisbien

The Supreme Court of the United States found in favor of major broadcasters, and against Aereo, in a case over the streaming of copyrighted material on the Internet.

Jordan Crook, Tech Crunch: "Aereo loses in Supreme Court, deemed illegal"

Katy Bachman, POLITICO: "Aereo loses copyright fight at Supreme Court"

As the violence escalates in Iraq, there’s a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act. What do Wolfowitz, Bremer, McCain and Graham have to say today that’s different than before the 2003 invasion of Iraq? Also, Eric Cantor’s primary defeat catches the national press off guard, another CNN documentary raises questions about transparency and authenticity, and Chelsea Clinton’s $600,000 paycheck. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Margaret Duffy: Views of the News.

As the violence escalates in Iraq at the hands of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), there's a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act.  What to Paul Wolfowitz, Paul Bremer, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) have to say today that's different than prior to the 2003 invasion of Iraq?

Jack Mirkinson, Huffington Post: “Iraq hawks are still dominating the media debate

Did George Will go too far, writing in his Washington Post column that being a sexual assault victim has become a “coveted status” on college campuses? Also, American Express commissions Tyler Perry for its latest commercial produced in the style of a documentary film, Time Inc.’s risky split from Time Warner, and why e-Harmony says reporters make good dates. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.

Flickr user Keith Allison

In a column published in the Friday, June 6 editions of the Washington Post, George F. Will wrote about what he considers a spread of progressivism at American colleges and universities. 

He drew the ire of many when he wrote of what he calls the "supposed campus epidemic of rape, a.k.a. sexual assault."  He attributes the number of reported to increased political correctness on campuses, and that when "making victimhood a coveted status that confers privileges, victims proliferate."

Hero or deserter? Negotiating with terrorists? The story of Bowe Bergdahl’s release has taken several twists since President Obama’s announcement Saturday afternoon.  Also, how young is too young when showing images of children facing adult criminal charges, a CNN reporter arrested on live television, and remembering Tiananmen Square 25 years later. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Lynda Kraxberger and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

U.S. Army photo

It was 2009 when Army Pfc. Bowe Bergdahl was captured and held as a prisoner of war in Afghanistan.  Saturday, President Barack Obama stood on the White House lawn flanked by Bergdahl's parents, to annnounce his release.

The Taliban freed Bergdahl as part of a prisoner swap.  In exchange for his release, the U.S. government agreed to release five prisoners from Guantanamo Bay.

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