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via Flickr user Keith Allison

Nine out of 10 Native Americans say support the use of the name “Redskins” for the Washington NFL franchise, according to a Washington Post poll of approximately 500 people. What prompted the paper to commission such a poll? And, how is the team’s ownership using it to further his own political purposes?

The woman at the center of the New York Times’ story about Donald Trump’s treatment of women has her words were taken out of context, and Trump wants everyone to know it. Also, why a “little black dress” made headlines in Los Angeles and the debate as to whether ‘This American Life’ producer Ira Glass has forgotten the mission of public radio. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

The woman at the center of the New York Times' story about Donald Trump’s treatment of women has her words were taken out of context, and Trump wants everyone to know it.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics. Also, why an editorial cartoonist lost his job at an Iowa farm publication, how an ex-Obama administration official “sold” the media on the Iran deal, and a quick death for London’s newest newspaper. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics.

Philip Bump, Washington Post: “Did Facebook bury conservative news? Ex-staffers say yes

You’d never say that to someone’s face, so why do people think it’s okay to tweet vile threats to journalists? On this week’s show, we’ll look at the #MoreThanMean campaign and how two female sports journalists hope to change the narrative. Also, who was Larry Wilmore really roasting at Saturday’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner, GQ’s profile of Melania Trump, an whether Arianna Huffington can strike a balance between her business and editorial roles. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

After years of shedding debt, what prompted Gannett to make a hostile bid for Tribune Publishing? We’ll look at the $815 million deal, what it might mean for news consumers and why the Tribune executives are fighting it. Also, Prince’s imprint on the record industry, why Kelly Ripa took a few days off from her ABC syndicated show, and cutting commercials from “Saturday Night Live” to keep an engaged audience. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Amy Simons / KBIA

After years of shedding debt, what prompted Gannett to make a hostile bid for Tribune Publishing? We’ll look at the $815 million deal, what it might mean for news consumers and why the Tribune executives are fighting it.

Roger Yu, USA Today: “Gannett offers $815 million to buy Tribune Publishing

What will our newspapers look like one year from now, if Donald Trump is elected president? That was what editors at the Boston Globe wanted readers to see when they published a “fake” front page Sunday. Was it effective? Also, the emotional challenges that come with taking a journalism job far from family and friends, the 9-year-old ace reporter breaking big stories in her Pennsylvania hometown, and some thoughts on the end of “American Idol.”  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What will our newspapers look like one year from now, if Donald Trump is elected president? That was what editors at the Boston Globe wanted readers to see when they published a “fake” front page Sunday. Was it effective?

Hadas Gold, POLITICO: “Boston Globe to publish fake front page on Trump presidency

More than 400 journalists from around the world collaborate, spending a year combing through 11 million documents. At the end, a detailed report that connects how a law firm in Panama could be behind hundreds of shell companies funding illegal activity around the globe. We’ll talk about the lasting impact that may come from the Panama Papers. Also, a new British newspaper that’s print-only, the NFL strikes a deal with Twitter to live stream Thursday Night Football games, and the latest from the campaign trail. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Pixabay user geralt

More than 400 journalists from around the world collaborate, spending a year combing through 11 million documents. At the end, a detailed report that connects how a law firm in Panama could be behind hundreds of shell companies funding illegal activity around the globe. We’ll talk about the lasting impact that may come from the Panama Papers.

Missouri School of Journalism students found themselves in the center of the Brussels terror attacks early this morning. We’ll talk about the challenge of reporting during traumatic events. Also, President Barack Obama’s historic trip to Cuba, on-going violence at Donald Trump rallies, and a big win for Hulk Hogan in his privacy suit against Gawker. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

via On the Media

Missouri School of Journalism students found themselves in the center of the Brussels terror attacks early this morning. We’ll talk about the challenge of reporting during traumatic events.

Jenna Middaugh, KOMU-TV: "16 Students, 1 MU professor safe in Brussels amid terror attacks"

It was a big weekend for the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism at the True/False Film Festival. “Concerned Student 1950,” a film produced by three documentary students, premiered Saturday night. And, professor Robert Greene’s award-winning film “Kate Plays Christine” had its local debut. But, it was filmmaker Spike Lee’s appearance that stole the show. Also, a jury awards Erin Andrews $55 million in damages after a stalker filmed her through a hotel peephole, Hulk Hogan’s testimony in his defamation case against Gawker, and how Hugh Hefner single-handedly saved his high school newspaper. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Jeimmie Nevalga / KBIA

It was a big weekend for the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism at the True/False Film Festival. “Concerned Student 1950,” a film produced by three documentary students, premiered Saturday night. And, professor Robert Greene’s award-winning film “Kate Plays Christine” had its local debut. But, it was filmmaker Spike Lee’s appearance that stole the show.

True/False: “Addition to the line up: Concerned Student 1950

The run up to the Super Tuesday primaries was full of media news – from Donald Trump’s call to open up libel laws, to the Secret Service’s takedown of a TIME photographer, to a fake New York Times article announcing a key endorsement for Bernie Sanders. Also, Chris Rock’s performance at the Oscars, MSNBC cancels Melissa Harris-Perry and transparency into the firing of former MU professor Melissa Click. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Michael Vadon

The run up to the Super Tuesday primaries was full of media news – from Donald Trump’s call to open up libel laws, to the Secret Service’s takedown of a TIME photographer, to a fake New York Times article announcing a key endorsement for Bernie Sanders.

Alex Griswold, Mediaite: “Marco Rubio’s latest attacks on Trump are crude, beyond the pale, and absolutely genius

Apple CEO Tim Cook says the company won’t comply with an FBI request to remove certain security features from its iPhone, allowing law enforcement access to encrypted data. He’s got support from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, Google and WhatsApp. But, Microsoft founder Bill Gates said Apple should cooperate. Also, a damning report about the lack of diversity in Hollywood, why SB Nation pulled its profile of convicted rapist Daniel Holtzclaw, and the remembering author Harper Lee. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Gonzalo Baeza

Apple CEO Tim Cook says the company won’t comply with an FBI request to remove certain security features from its iPhone, allowing law enforcement access to encrypted data. He’s got support from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, Google and WhatsApp. But, Microsoft founder Bill Gates said Apple should cooperate.

MU Communications Professor Melissa Click broke her silence, telling her story to several local media outlets. But, her attempt to repair her image faced a new challenge Saturday, when the Columbia Missourian published video from the Homecoming parade. Also, how the media covered the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, journalists making and accepting donations and some potentially revolutionary organizational changes coming to the BBC. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

MU Communications Professor Melissa Click broke her silence, telling her story to several local media outlets. But, her attempt to repair her image faced a new challenge Saturday, when the Columbia Missourian published video from the Homecoming parade.

As the Zika virus moves north, journalists across America struggle to tell the story and raise awareness without feeding into the culture of fear. One in five people will contract it, yet few will become sick enough to ever see a doctor. So, why are we talking about the safety of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro? Also, University of Kansas students sue over funding cuts at the University Daily Kansan, why editors at The Bustle are asking new employees deeply personal questions and an update from the Las Vegas Review-Journal. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Debra Mason: Views of the News.


via Flickr user coniferconifer

As the Zika virus moves north, journalists across America struggle to tell the story and raise awareness without feeding into the culture of fear. One in five people will contract it, yet few will become sick enough to ever see a doctor. So, why are we talking about the safety of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro?

The Iowa caucuses are over, and the nation’s attention turns to New Hampshire. What does Monday’s win mean for Ted Cruz, Donald Trump and Marco Rubio? And, how might a tight race on the Democratic side change the narrative? Also, a look at the coverage of the Flint, Michigan water contamination crisis, an Ohio judge sanctions an attorney for talking to the press, and a Connecticut newspaper shuts down its newsroom – but is still in daily production. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Tim Vos: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Stephen Cummings

The Iowa caucuses are over, and the nation’s attention turns to New Hampshire. What does Monday’s win mean for Ted Cruz, Donald Trump and Marco Rubio? And, how might a tight race on the Democratic side change the narrative?

Nick Baumann, Huffington Post: “Don’t let the media and Marco Rubio tell you he ‘won’ by finishing third in Iowa

Will a judge buy it? A man convicted of threatening a California Islamic advocacy group claims binge-watching Fox News for a week following the Charlie Hebdo attacks made him do it. Also, the power of political polling, Bloomberg covering Bloomberg. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Debra Mason: Views of the News.

Courtesy KGTV

Will a judge buy it? A man convicted of threatening a California Islamic advocacy group claims binge-watching Fox News for a week following the Charlie Hebdo attacks made him do it.

Christopher Mathias, Huffington Post: “Did binge-watching Fox News inspire this man to threaten Muslims?

Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian is free and back with family and colleagues after 545 days in an Iranian prison. Several news agencies knew about diplomatic efforts to free him. So, why did they choose not to run the story until his release was secure? Also, the end of Al Jazeera America, Sean Penn says he’s “sad about the state of journalism in our country,” and Univision buys The Onion, really. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

via Flickr user 2012 Pop Culture Geek

On February 28, all eyes will turn to Hollywood for the Academy Awards. Comedian Chris Rock is slated to host the telecast. But, pressure is mounting on him to join a boycott over the lack of diversity in this year's pool of nominees. Jada Pinkett Smith and Spike Lee are leading the charge for actors, directors and producers of color to simply stay home that night.

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