Views

  Details are still coming together in Roanoke, Va., where a disgruntled former employee shot and killed a reporter and photographer live on the air. Also, Cox’s Rare Media posts a job looking for a reporter that’s “less Paula Zahn, more Zoe Barnes.” It’s a House of Cards reference to a young, driven reporter willing to work sources – intimately -- to get her story. And, is it ethical to identify names of Ashley Madison subscribers obtained through theft, drama on CNBC and when journalists should turn into activists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Hackers stole hook-up site Ashley Madison's member database and made it searchable online. Since that happened, media outlets around the world have been scouring the data and identifying users. Is it ethical for journalists to publish the data, given it's been made available to them via illegal means?

Chava Gourarie, Columbia Journalism Review: “Is it ethical to write about hacked Ashley Madison users?

Emotions are running high 10 years after Hurricane Katrina made landfall on New Orleans, so what was a Chicago Tribune columnist thinking when she wrote that she prayed for a storm like Katrina to wipe out Chicago? Also, how Pro-Publica and the New York Times worked together to determine a special relationship between AT&T and the National Security Agency, Sesame Street’s move to HBO and more. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy Chicago Tribune

At a time when so many are writing anniversary stories looking back on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina,  Chicago Tribune columnist Kristen McQueary wrote a column under the headline "In Chicago, Wishing for a Hurricane Katrina."

That headline was changed after readers took great offense to McQueary's assertion that the city of Chicago needs a storm the size and strength of Katrina to reset the city's mounting debt, it's struggling schools and it's political infighting.

People in Ferguson and across the country marked the one-year anniversary of the police-involved shooting death of Michael Brown. What’s changed? What hasn’t? And how is it the media is still so tied to the center of this story? Donald Trump continues to steal the headlines in the GOP presidential push, investigative powerhouse ProPublica teams up with the online review site, Yelp, and Jon Stewart issues us all a challenge. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

  Is any publicity good publicity for Donald Trump?  He’s certainly testing that proposition with his attack on John McCain’s war record.  And some say the media are depriving more serious presidential contenders of oxygen by focusing so much on the real estate mogul and reality TV star.  Amateur drones are getting in the way of California firefighters.  The publisher of the celebrity gossip site Gawker pulls a salacious story, prompting two of his editors to quit.  Critics accuse journalists of being too quick to blame sexism for the resignation of Reddit’s CEO.  And Harper Lee’s new novel raises some difficult questions for reviewers.  It’s Views of the News with Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Lynda Kraxberger and Jamie Grey.

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions. Also, the Kansas City Star reports on a culture of sexual harassment at the state capitol and a look at a wave of compassionate acts among competing newsrooms. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Amanda Hinnant: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Quinn Dombrowski

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions on marriage equality, the death penalty, health care subsidies, and more.

Pop rocker Taylor Swift takes a bite out of Apple, forcing the company to revise its royalty payment plans for the new Apple Music streaming system. What lessons could journalists take from her demand for fair pay? Also, the deadly shooting at Emanuel AME Church reignited the national conversation about race, but has the media done its job to move that conversation forward. And, you can take the “interim” off Lester Holt’s title as anchor of NBC Nightly News. We’ll look at what’s ahead for the network as Brian Williams’ suspension expires and he moves to MSNBC. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Jana Beamer

Less than 24 hours after pop rocker Taylor Swift told Apple she'd withhold her hit album, 1989, from the new Apple Music streaming service, the company revised its plan for royalty payouts. Originally, Apple wasn't planning to pay record labels royalties for streams during the free three-month trial period.

Taylor Swift: “To Apple, Love Taylor

  A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. Also, how an Arkansas judge’s alternative sentencing stands to affect one television station’s editorial product, why Glenn Greenwald says a story in the Sunday Times is “the opposite of journalism,” and the experiment to drive home the importance of mobile at the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.

Courtesy KXLY-TV

A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. What is it like to ask questions of someone when you know it'll likely change the course of their life forever? Has the media been fair to Rachel Dolezal, her experience and her story?

Jeff Humphrey, KXLY: "First on KXLY: Rachel Dolezal responds to race allegations"

Fox News Channel scored huge ratings with last week’s exclusive interview with members of the Duggar family. Megyn Kelly promised to ask the tough questions. Did she? Did the Duggars do anything to help themselves in the court of public opinion? Also, how the gender gap affects the quality of news reporting, the next steps at Gawker Media now that employees agree to union representation, and an NPR/ProPublica follows Red Cross spending in Haiti. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.


Courtesy Fox News Channel

Members of the Duggar family appeared on Fox News Channel's The Kelly File to to talk about the abuse allegations against the oldest child, Josh. Jessa Duggar Seewald and Jill Duggar Dillard told Megyn Kelly they are two of their brother's victims. But, they said, they've long forgiven him. Instead, they say, it the media violated them and privacy laws were broken in the process.

  Call her Caitlyn. It’s a message that seems simple enough, yet some in the media continue to refer to Caitlyn Jenner using her birth name and male pronouns.

Also, why employees at Gawker Media are voting on union organization, the ethics of fabricating a scientific study to prove a point about shoddy science journalism and an former FIFA official’s unofficial defense against corruption charges? An article in The Onion.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy Vanity Fair

After months of rumor and speculation, tabloid headlines and network news interviews, Caitlyn Jenner made her debut with the release of July issue of Vanity Fair magazine.

Jenner's transition has made headlines -- and raised questions about how the media covers the transgender community.

Vanity Fair: “Introducing Caitlyn Jenner

Cable channel TLC pulled the reality tv series “19 Kids & Counting” amidst allegations the eldest child, Josh Duggar, was named in an underage sex abuse complaint. When did TLC first learn of the allegations? What was Oprah Winfrey’s role in the investigation? Also, what’s in Hillary Clinton’s emails, why the New York Times says its cutting back on the number of movies it reviews and how trauma affects journalists on the job. 

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Lwp Kommunikacio

Cable channel TLC pulled the reality tv series “19 Kids & Counting” amidst allegations the eldest child, Josh Duggar, was named in an underage sex abuse complaint. When did TLC first learn of the allegations?

In Touch Weekly: "Bombshell Duggar police report: Jim Bob Duggar didn’t report son Josh’s alleged sex offenses for more than a year

  The New York Times got America talking about the high price of cheap manicures. We’ll talk about the blockbuster investigation, the near-immediate regulatory changes it’s already brought to the industry and the paper’s decision to roll it out online days before it appeared in print to create buzz. Also, the mega merger between Verizon and AOL, why some are critical of Seymour Hersh’s assertion the Obama administration lied about bin Laden and the end of “American Idol.” From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Verizon has announced it plans to buy AOL for $4.4 billion in an effort to drive the provider's mobile and over-the-top (OTT) video strategies. 

  Cable companies and professional sports leagues say journalists live-streaming violates their copyright. How far will they go to stop it? And, how are reporters responding? Also, what happens when a journalist – who is also a surgeon – is sent to cover a natural disaster, how the New York Times customized a story just for you, an analysis of the coverage of Freddie Gray’s death and the Baltimore protests and more.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Wikimedia user Veggies

There's quiet in the streets of Baltimore again, but the media is still talking about the death of Freddie Gray and the protests that erupted in the aftermath.

David Zurawik, Baltimore Sun: “FOP besmirches media, but WBAL has clear conflict of interest with prosecutor’s office

Study Shows Women Journalists Burn Out Faster Than Men

Apr 30, 2015
Softmedia

The journalism field is demanding. The long, intense hours and news-never-ends-therefore-we-don't-stop mentality can lead to a burnout. A recent University of Kansas study shows that female workers are tending to leave the field earlier than their counterparts. University of Missouri professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss why that might be on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

Courtesy NBC

Former Dateline NBC program, "To Catch a Predator" may make a comeback. The show was hosted by Chris Hansen where he and the civilian watchdog group, Perverted-Justice teamed up to lure people looking to have sex with minors. The last episode aired seven years ago, and Hansen is looking to bring the program back, but this time he'll call it, "Hansen vs. Predator."

Missouri School of Journalism professors and "Views of the News" hosts Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss Hansen's quest to harvest support through Kickstarter.

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    


Courtesy NBC

Remember NBC’s franchise, “To Catch a Predator?” Chris Hansen does, and he hopes you do, too. The former network investigative reporter is launching a Kickstarter campaign to revive the one-time hit. If he’s successful in raising $400,000, his new program “Hansen vs. Predator” will run online while Hansen tries to sell it to a network.

  Who is to blame for the journalism malpractice at Rolling Stone? The reporter? The editors? The fact-checkers? Jackie? Columbia Journalism School’s report into to “A Rape On Campus” is out, and it’s scathing. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean will talk about how it happened, why it happened and what can be done to prevent it from happening again.


Courtesy Rolling Stone

The Columbia Journalism School issued a 12,600-plus word indictment of Rolling Stone's story, "A Rape on Campus."  The months-long investigation revealed a breakdown in the reporting, editing and fact-checking processes -- as reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely put too much emphasis on an account provided to her by a single source, "Jackie." It also pointed to fatal flaws in the verification of her story prior to publication.

    

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts. Also, the media lockout at a law school event featuring St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch, how newsroom diversity affects workplace culture, the Colorado Springs Gazette’s editorial project, Clearing the Haze. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts.

  Robert Durst, the focus of HBO’s ‘The Jinx’ docuseries, is now under arrest and charged with murder in the 2000 homicide of Susan Berman. How role did filmmakers Andrew Jarecki and Marc Smeling play in cracking the case? And, how likely is it the statements they recorded will be admissible in court? Also, a partnership between Starbucks and USA Today attempts to drive a nationwide discussion on race, the Obama administration deletes a rule obligating part of it from the Freedom of Information Act, and whether TIME Magazine gave Hillary Clinton horns on its latest cover. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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