Views of the News

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions. Also, the Kansas City Star reports on a culture of sexual harassment at the state capitol and a look at a wave of compassionate acts among competing newsrooms. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Amanda Hinnant: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Quinn Dombrowski

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions on marriage equality, the death penalty, health care subsidies, and more.

Pop rocker Taylor Swift takes a bite out of Apple, forcing the company to revise its royalty payment plans for the new Apple Music streaming system. What lessons could journalists take from her demand for fair pay? Also, the deadly shooting at Emanuel AME Church reignited the national conversation about race, but has the media done its job to move that conversation forward. And, you can take the “interim” off Lester Holt’s title as anchor of NBC Nightly News. We’ll look at what’s ahead for the network as Brian Williams’ suspension expires and he moves to MSNBC. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Jana Beamer

Less than 24 hours after pop rocker Taylor Swift told Apple she'd withhold her hit album, 1989, from the new Apple Music streaming service, the company revised its plan for royalty payouts. Originally, Apple wasn't planning to pay record labels royalties for streams during the free three-month trial period.

Taylor Swift: “To Apple, Love Taylor

  A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. Also, how an Arkansas judge’s alternative sentencing stands to affect one television station’s editorial product, why Glenn Greenwald says a story in the Sunday Times is “the opposite of journalism,” and the experiment to drive home the importance of mobile at the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.

Courtesy KXLY-TV

A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. What is it like to ask questions of someone when you know it'll likely change the course of their life forever? Has the media been fair to Rachel Dolezal, her experience and her story?

Jeff Humphrey, KXLY: "First on KXLY: Rachel Dolezal responds to race allegations"

Fox News Channel scored huge ratings with last week’s exclusive interview with members of the Duggar family. Megyn Kelly promised to ask the tough questions. Did she? Did the Duggars do anything to help themselves in the court of public opinion? Also, how the gender gap affects the quality of news reporting, the next steps at Gawker Media now that employees agree to union representation, and an NPR/ProPublica follows Red Cross spending in Haiti. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.


Courtesy Fox News Channel

Members of the Duggar family appeared on Fox News Channel's The Kelly File to to talk about the abuse allegations against the oldest child, Josh. Jessa Duggar Seewald and Jill Duggar Dillard told Megyn Kelly they are two of their brother's victims. But, they said, they've long forgiven him. Instead, they say, it the media violated them and privacy laws were broken in the process.

  Call her Caitlyn. It’s a message that seems simple enough, yet some in the media continue to refer to Caitlyn Jenner using her birth name and male pronouns.

Also, why employees at Gawker Media are voting on union organization, the ethics of fabricating a scientific study to prove a point about shoddy science journalism and an former FIFA official’s unofficial defense against corruption charges? An article in The Onion.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy Vanity Fair

After months of rumor and speculation, tabloid headlines and network news interviews, Caitlyn Jenner made her debut with the release of July issue of Vanity Fair magazine.

Jenner's transition has made headlines -- and raised questions about how the media covers the transgender community.

Vanity Fair: “Introducing Caitlyn Jenner

Cable channel TLC pulled the reality tv series “19 Kids & Counting” amidst allegations the eldest child, Josh Duggar, was named in an underage sex abuse complaint. When did TLC first learn of the allegations? What was Oprah Winfrey’s role in the investigation? Also, what’s in Hillary Clinton’s emails, why the New York Times says its cutting back on the number of movies it reviews and how trauma affects journalists on the job. 

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Lwp Kommunikacio

Cable channel TLC pulled the reality tv series “19 Kids & Counting” amidst allegations the eldest child, Josh Duggar, was named in an underage sex abuse complaint. When did TLC first learn of the allegations?

In Touch Weekly: "Bombshell Duggar police report: Jim Bob Duggar didn’t report son Josh’s alleged sex offenses for more than a year

  The New York Times got America talking about the high price of cheap manicures. We’ll talk about the blockbuster investigation, the near-immediate regulatory changes it’s already brought to the industry and the paper’s decision to roll it out online days before it appeared in print to create buzz. Also, the mega merger between Verizon and AOL, why some are critical of Seymour Hersh’s assertion the Obama administration lied about bin Laden and the end of “American Idol.” From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Verizon has announced it plans to buy AOL for $4.4 billion in an effort to drive the provider's mobile and over-the-top (OTT) video strategies. 

  Cable companies and professional sports leagues say journalists live-streaming violates their copyright. How far will they go to stop it? And, how are reporters responding? Also, what happens when a journalist – who is also a surgeon – is sent to cover a natural disaster, how the New York Times customized a story just for you, an analysis of the coverage of Freddie Gray’s death and the Baltimore protests and more.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Wikimedia user Veggies

There's quiet in the streets of Baltimore again, but the media is still talking about the death of Freddie Gray and the protests that erupted in the aftermath.

David Zurawik, Baltimore Sun: “FOP besmirches media, but WBAL has clear conflict of interest with prosecutor’s office

670 The Score

  Two Chicago sports radio personalities on 670 The Score caught some flak after a Twitter exchange of sexist comments went viral. A few weeks later, the station announced it hired Julie DiCaro to contribute sports blogs for the WSCR-AM and CBSChicago.com website. 

The Score acknowledged its need for female representation. 

Study Shows Women Journalists Burn Out Faster Than Men

Apr 30, 2015
Softmedia

The journalism field is demanding. The long, intense hours and news-never-ends-therefore-we-don't-stop mentality can lead to a burnout. A recent University of Kansas study shows that female workers are tending to leave the field earlier than their counterparts. University of Missouri professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss why that might be on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

Rand Paul Versus The Media

Apr 20, 2015
Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Republican candidate Rand Paul is prickly. At least when he's being interviewed. Paul got into it with The Today Show's Savannah Guthrie, Fox News' Megyn Kelly and The Guardian's Paul Lewis. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss whose skin is thinner.

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

Flickr user Rona Proudfoot

On Sunday Hillary Clinton sent a tweet and posted a YouTube video announcing her candidacy for president. What is Clinton's campaign doing differently this time around? Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

via Flickr user Anthony Quintano

We are all C-SPAN now. Two new apps hit the market in the last few weeks that make it possible to live stream footage straight from your mobile phone, and share it through Twitter. Meerkat and Periscope are both free to download, and journalists are already starting to explore new ways to deliver content instantly. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, Views of the News. 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  


The Future of Rolling Stone Discussed

Apr 11, 2015
Courtesy Rolling Stone

  A moment that will go down in journalism's history, the failure of Rolling Stone's article, "A Rape on Campus." Rolling Stone published its article last November, a story that depicted a brutal gang rape on University of Virginia student, "Jackie." The article resulted in a wave of controversy across the nation as factual errors began to arise. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on Views of the News and what's in store for Rolling Stone moving forward. 

  Who is to blame for the journalism malpractice at Rolling Stone? The reporter? The editors? The fact-checkers? Jackie? Columbia Journalism School’s report into to “A Rape On Campus” is out, and it’s scathing. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean will talk about how it happened, why it happened and what can be done to prevent it from happening again.


Courtesy Rolling Stone

The Columbia Journalism School issued a 12,600-plus word indictment of Rolling Stone's story, "A Rape on Campus."  The months-long investigation revealed a breakdown in the reporting, editing and fact-checking processes -- as reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely put too much emphasis on an account provided to her by a single source, "Jackie." It also pointed to fatal flaws in the verification of her story prior to publication.

 Sports radio talk personalities Dan Bernstein and Matt Speigel criticized Comcast sports sideline reporter Aiyana Cristal's on-air performance, but ended up focusing more on her body and not her work. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

 

Bob McCulloch Spoke on MU's Campus, But to a Select Group

Apr 2, 2015
KARA TABOR / KBIA

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch spoke at the Missouri School of Law on Tuesday about the grand jury process. McCulloch was the lead prosecutor to handle the jury during the Ferguson case that decided not to indict former officer Darren Wilson who shot and killed Michael Brown last August. 

The event was not heavily promoted. Instead, it was only open to students, faculty and staff of the MU Law School who had to register for the event. The student chapter of the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys organized McCulloch's appearance, and said due to full capacity of Hulston Hall the public was not allowed in, including the media. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News."

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

 


Justin Eagan / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) signed the state's Religious Freedom Restoration Act into law Thursday, March 26. The law is said to allow businesses to refuse service citing religious reasons. The fear? Those in opposition to the law say this is legislated discrimination, and that it specifically targets the LGBTQ community. ABC'S George Stephanopoulos directly asked Pence if this law is discriminatory, and Pence dodged the question about seven times. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News."

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  


    

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts. Also, the media lockout at a law school event featuring St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch, how newsroom diversity affects workplace culture, the Colorado Springs Gazette’s editorial project, Clearing the Haze. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts.

  Robert Durst, the focus of HBO’s ‘The Jinx’ docuseries, is now under arrest and charged with murder in the 2000 homicide of Susan Berman. How role did filmmakers Andrew Jarecki and Marc Smeling play in cracking the case? And, how likely is it the statements they recorded will be admissible in court? Also, a partnership between Starbucks and USA Today attempts to drive a nationwide discussion on race, the Obama administration deletes a rule obligating part of it from the Freedom of Information Act, and whether TIME Magazine gave Hillary Clinton horns on its latest cover. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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