Views of the News

For years, WikiLeaks has been known for it’s crusade against government secrecy. But, the Associated Press reports that innocent, private citizens have had very personal information published online. Why would the agency publish medical record, name child rape victims or out gay men in Saudi Arabia? Also, another major shakeup in the Trump campaign, the end of Gawker, and Ryan Lochte’s fall from grace. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

For years, WikiLeaks has been known for it’s crusade against government secrecy. But, the Associated Press reports that innocent, private citizens have had very personal information published online. Why would the agency publish medical record, name child rape victims or out gay men in Saudi Arabia?

Raphael Satter & Maggie Michael, Associated Press: “Private lives exposed as WikiLeaks spills its secrets

John Oliver summed it up succinctly on Sunday night’s episode of Last Week Tonight, “the media is a food chain which would fall apart without local newspapers.” We’ll talk about Oliver’s harsh words for the content creators and why so many reporters and editors are cheering him on. Also, a look of the best –and the worst – of the coverage of the Olympic games in Rio and Fox News after Roger Ailes. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


John Oliver summed it up succinctly on Sunday night’s episode of Last Week Tonight, “the media is a food chain which would fall apart without local newspapers.” We’ll talk about Oliver’s harsh words for the content creators and why so many reporters and editors are cheering him on.

The Hill, The Atlantic and POLITICO are among the news organizations offering sponsorship opportunities for events at the Republican and Democratic National Conventions later this month. In many cases, special interests are footing the bill. Is it a conflict of interest or creative way to create and alternative revenue stream… or both? Also, the influence ‘Serial’ might have had in getting Adnan Syed a new trial, why PBS used video from a past fireworks show Monday night, and how Facebook’s new algorithm may hurt publishers. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Matt Stoller

The Hill, The Atlantic and POLITICO are among the news organizations offering sponsorships opportunities for events at the Republican and Democratic National Conventions later this month. In many cases, special interests are footing the bill. Is it a conflict of interest or creative way to create and alternative revenue stream… or both?

Lee Fang, The Intercept: “Major political news outlets offer interviews for sale at DNC and RNC conventions

Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski is CNN’s newest political analyst, offering insight and analysis into his former employer. Why did the cable network plop down $500,000 to bring him on board? How will non-disclosure agreements affect his ability to offer insights? And, does that hurt CNN’s credibility? Also, live streaming the House sit-in using social media apps, covering the Brexit vote and a reporter’s undercover reporting inside a for-profit prison. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Image via Wikimedia Commons

Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski is CNN’s newest political analyst, offering insight and analysis into his former employer. Why did the cable network plop down $500,000 to bring him on board? How will non-disclosure agreements affect his ability to offer insights? And, does that hurt CNN’s credibility?

As with so many mass shootings in this country, the events at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub raised many questions about access to guns, terrorism, radicalized Islam – and homophobia. But now critics are questioning whether a journalist’s sexual orientation or gender identity may influence their ability to cover the story fairly. Is that criticism fair? Also, the FAA relaxes regulations on commercial drone use, Disney’s coverage of Disney, and Donald Trump’s decision to pull the Washington Post’s credentials. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Did Hillary Clinton clinch the nomination for president on Monday? Some media outlets say she did. Others say not quite. Why the confusion? BuzzFeed turns down $1.3 million in advertising from the Republican Committee over Donald Trump. Also, Tribune Publishing becomes tronc and Ken Starr’s bizarre television moment. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mark Hinojosa: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

Did Hillary Clinton clinch the nomination for president on Monday? Some media outlets say she did. Others say not quite. Why the confusion?

Hadas Gold, POLITICO: “Why the AP called it for Clinton

Brian Stelter, CNN Money: “Why the media were ready to call Clinton the ‘presumptive nominee’

It took him nearly a decade, but Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel has found a way to get revenge on Gawker Media for outing him: secretly bankroll defamation lawsuits to drive it out of business. He financed Hulk Hogan’s case to the tune of $10 million and is said to be behind other celebrity lawsuits, too. Also, whether an editor’s decision discredits Katie Couric’s gun safety documentary, Donald Trump spars with reporters, and the debut of cable television’s ‘Roots’ reboot. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Steve Jurvetson

It took him nearly a decade, but Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel has found a way to get revenge on Gawker Media for outing him: secretly bankroll defamation lawsuits to drive it out of business. He financed Hulk Hogan’s case to the tune of $10 million and is said to be behind other celebrity lawsuits, too.

Nick Denton, Gawker: “An open letter to Peter Thiel

Nine out of 10 Native Americans say they support the use of the name “Redskins” for the Washington NFL franchise, according to a Washington Post poll of approximately 500 people. What prompted the paper to commission such a poll? And, how is the team’s ownership using it to further his own political purposes? Also, St. Louis County drops the trespassing charges against two journalists arrested in Ferguson, the latest in the negotiations between Tribune Publishing and Gannett and the saga of Sumner Redstone and control of Viacom.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Keith Allison

Nine out of 10 Native Americans say support the use of the name “Redskins” for the Washington NFL franchise, according to a Washington Post poll of approximately 500 people. What prompted the paper to commission such a poll? And, how is the team’s ownership using it to further his own political purposes?

The woman at the center of the New York Times’ story about Donald Trump’s treatment of women has her words were taken out of context, and Trump wants everyone to know it. Also, why a “little black dress” made headlines in Los Angeles and the debate as to whether ‘This American Life’ producer Ira Glass has forgotten the mission of public radio. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

The woman at the center of the New York Times' story about Donald Trump’s treatment of women has her words were taken out of context, and Trump wants everyone to know it.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics. Also, why an editorial cartoonist lost his job at an Iowa farm publication, how an ex-Obama administration official “sold” the media on the Iran deal, and a quick death for London’s newest newspaper. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics.

Philip Bump, Washington Post: “Did Facebook bury conservative news? Ex-staffers say yes

You’d never say that to someone’s face, so why do people think it’s okay to tweet vile threats to journalists? On this week’s show, we’ll look at the #MoreThanMean campaign and how two female sports journalists hope to change the narrative. Also, who was Larry Wilmore really roasting at Saturday’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner, GQ’s profile of Melania Trump, an whether Arianna Huffington can strike a balance between her business and editorial roles. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

After years of shedding debt, what prompted Gannett to make a hostile bid for Tribune Publishing? We’ll look at the $815 million deal, what it might mean for news consumers and why the Tribune executives are fighting it. Also, Prince’s imprint on the record industry, why Kelly Ripa took a few days off from her ABC syndicated show, and cutting commercials from “Saturday Night Live” to keep an engaged audience. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Amy Simons / KBIA

After years of shedding debt, what prompted Gannett to make a hostile bid for Tribune Publishing? We’ll look at the $815 million deal, what it might mean for news consumers and why the Tribune executives are fighting it.

Roger Yu, USA Today: “Gannett offers $815 million to buy Tribune Publishing

What will our newspapers look like one year from now, if Donald Trump is elected president? That was what editors at the Boston Globe wanted readers to see when they published a “fake” front page Sunday. Was it effective? Also, the emotional challenges that come with taking a journalism job far from family and friends, the 9-year-old ace reporter breaking big stories in her Pennsylvania hometown, and some thoughts on the end of “American Idol.”  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What will our newspapers look like one year from now, if Donald Trump is elected president? That was what editors at the Boston Globe wanted readers to see when they published a “fake” front page Sunday. Was it effective?

Hadas Gold, POLITICO: “Boston Globe to publish fake front page on Trump presidency

More than 400 journalists from around the world collaborate, spending a year combing through 11 million documents. At the end, a detailed report that connects how a law firm in Panama could be behind hundreds of shell companies funding illegal activity around the globe. We’ll talk about the lasting impact that may come from the Panama Papers. Also, a new British newspaper that’s print-only, the NFL strikes a deal with Twitter to live stream Thursday Night Football games, and the latest from the campaign trail. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Pixabay user geralt

More than 400 journalists from around the world collaborate, spending a year combing through 11 million documents. At the end, a detailed report that connects how a law firm in Panama could be behind hundreds of shell companies funding illegal activity around the globe. We’ll talk about the lasting impact that may come from the Panama Papers.

Missouri School of Journalism students found themselves in the center of the Brussels terror attacks early this morning. We’ll talk about the challenge of reporting during traumatic events. Also, President Barack Obama’s historic trip to Cuba, on-going violence at Donald Trump rallies, and a big win for Hulk Hogan in his privacy suit against Gawker. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

via On the Media

Missouri School of Journalism students found themselves in the center of the Brussels terror attacks early this morning. We’ll talk about the challenge of reporting during traumatic events.

Jenna Middaugh, KOMU-TV: "16 Students, 1 MU professor safe in Brussels amid terror attacks"

It was a big weekend for the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism at the True/False Film Festival. “Concerned Student 1950,” a film produced by three documentary students, premiered Saturday night. And, professor Robert Greene’s award-winning film “Kate Plays Christine” had its local debut. But, it was filmmaker Spike Lee’s appearance that stole the show. Also, a jury awards Erin Andrews $55 million in damages after a stalker filmed her through a hotel peephole, Hulk Hogan’s testimony in his defamation case against Gawker, and how Hugh Hefner single-handedly saved his high school newspaper. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Jeimmie Nevalga / KBIA

It was a big weekend for the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism at the True/False Film Festival. “Concerned Student 1950,” a film produced by three documentary students, premiered Saturday night. And, professor Robert Greene’s award-winning film “Kate Plays Christine” had its local debut. But, it was filmmaker Spike Lee’s appearance that stole the show.

True/False: “Addition to the line up: Concerned Student 1950

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