Views of the News

MU Communications Professor Melissa Click broke her silence, telling her story to several local media outlets. But, her attempt to repair her image faced a new challenge Saturday, when the Columbia Missourian published video from the Homecoming parade. Also, how the media covered the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, journalists making and accepting donations and some potentially revolutionary organizational changes coming to the BBC. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

As the Zika virus moves north, journalists across America struggle to tell the story and raise awareness without feeding into the culture of fear. One in five people will contract it, yet few will become sick enough to ever see a doctor. So, why are we talking about the safety of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro? Also, University of Kansas students sue over funding cuts at the University Daily Kansan, why editors at The Bustle are asking new employees deeply personal questions and an update from the Las Vegas Review-Journal. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Debra Mason: Views of the News.


via Flickr user coniferconifer

As the Zika virus moves north, journalists across America struggle to tell the story and raise awareness without feeding into the culture of fear. One in five people will contract it, yet few will become sick enough to ever see a doctor. So, why are we talking about the safety of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro?

The Iowa caucuses are over, and the nation’s attention turns to New Hampshire. What does Monday’s win mean for Ted Cruz, Donald Trump and Marco Rubio? And, how might a tight race on the Democratic side change the narrative? Also, a look at the coverage of the Flint, Michigan water contamination crisis, an Ohio judge sanctions an attorney for talking to the press, and a Connecticut newspaper shuts down its newsroom – but is still in daily production. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Tim Vos: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Stephen Cummings

The Iowa caucuses are over, and the nation’s attention turns to New Hampshire. What does Monday’s win mean for Ted Cruz, Donald Trump and Marco Rubio? And, how might a tight race on the Democratic side change the narrative?

Nick Baumann, Huffington Post: “Don’t let the media and Marco Rubio tell you he ‘won’ by finishing third in Iowa

Will a judge buy it? A man convicted of threatening a California Islamic advocacy group claims binge-watching Fox News for a week following the Charlie Hebdo attacks made him do it. Also, the power of political polling, Bloomberg covering Bloomberg. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Debra Mason: Views of the News.

Courtesy KGTV

Will a judge buy it? A man convicted of threatening a California Islamic advocacy group claims binge-watching Fox News for a week following the Charlie Hebdo attacks made him do it.

Christopher Mathias, Huffington Post: “Did binge-watching Fox News inspire this man to threaten Muslims?

Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian is free and back with family and colleagues after 545 days in an Iranian prison. Several news agencies knew about diplomatic efforts to free him. So, why did they choose not to run the story until his release was secure? Also, the end of Al Jazeera America, Sean Penn says he’s “sad about the state of journalism in our country,” and Univision buys The Onion, really. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

via Flickr user 2012 Pop Culture Geek

On February 28, all eyes will turn to Hollywood for the Academy Awards. Comedian Chris Rock is slated to host the telecast. But, pressure is mounting on him to join a boycott over the lack of diversity in this year's pool of nominees. Jada Pinkett Smith and Spike Lee are leading the charge for actors, directors and producers of color to simply stay home that night.

The NFL owners voted late Tuesday to allow the St. Louis Rams to move to Los Angeles, effective with the start of the 2016 season. Actor-turned-activist Sean Penn told the Associated Press he has nothing to hide following the publication of his 11,000-word account of an interview with Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman. How did the meeting in the jungle clearing come to be? And, why did Rolling Stone agree to give the drug kingpin editorial control prior to publication? Also, Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” proves once again audiences crave true crime stories, and the Missouri legislature considers tightening restrictions on some journalists while easing up on others. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Who owns the Las Vegas Review-Journal? Someone paid $140 million in cash for Nevada’s largest newspaper, but no one knows who that someone is. The rather unusual situation has staffers demanding answers. Also, Disney’s promotion machine is on full blast for Friday’s release of ‘Star Wars: A Force Awakens.’ Will the film live up to the hype? And, Serial returns for its second season. Why don’t fans seem as interested in Bowe Bergdahl as they were Adnan Syed? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Disney’s promotion machine is on full blast for Friday’s release of ‘Star Wars: A Force Awakens.’ Will the film live up to the hype?

Kristen Hare, Poynter: “Bloomberg Business made some data journalism our of ‘Star Wars’

Friday, cable news audiences watched aghast as reporters from MSBNC, CNN and Fox News Channel toured the San Bernardino shooters’ home, broadcasting live as they pilfered through belongings. What’s the value in broadcasting that moment? Is there any? Also, Huffington Post’s about-face on Trump campaign coverage, Sinclair Broadcast Group announces plans to revive the once-popular web app Circa. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Peter Stevens

Friday, cable news audiences watched aghast as reporters from MSBNC, CNN and Fox News Channel toured the San Bernardino shooters’ home, broadcasting live as they pilfered through belongings. What’s the value in broadcasting that moment? Is there any?

Seth Fiegerman, Mashable: “Ethics went out the window when media mobbed the San Bernardino shooters’ apartment

via Flickr user Chad Kainz

Twenty-nine-year-old Brandon Smith spends most of his time driving for Uber and Lyft, but the independent journalist’s relentless fight to make the video of Laquan McDonald’s death public is changing Chicago history. The unarmed black teen was shot 16 times by a white police officer. Now that officer is charged with first-degree murder.

Actor Charlie Sheen speaks out, telling Today Show anchor Matt Lauer he is HIV positive. The diagnosis came years ago, but Sheen said he’s speaking now to ease the stigma… and to put a stop to blackmail attempts from those threating to make the information public. Also, Mizzou makes more headlines, Geraldo Rivera’s reunion with his daughter following the Paris terror attacks, and extending the copyright on The Diary of Anne Frank. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Joella Marano

Actor Charlie Sheen revealed he is HIV positive during an appearance on the Today Show on Tuesday. He told Matt Lauer he was speaking out now to try and end a smear campaign against him... and to end the stigma associated with the virus. 

Eun Kyung Kim, TODAY: “Charlie Sheen reveals he’s HIV positive in TODAY Show exclusive

It’s been a historic week at the University of Missouri. On Monday, Tim Wolfe resigned as president of the UM System. Hours later, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced he is stepping down from that office at the end of the year. We’ll look at local, regional and national media coverage, talk about challenges to the First Amendment, and examine the role of Mizzou Football. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

It’s been a historic week at the University of Missouri. On Monday, Tim Wolfe resigned as president of the UM System. Hours later, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced he is stepping down from that office at the end of the year. We’ll look at local, regional and national media coverage, talk about challenges to the First Amendment, and examine the role of Mizzou Football.

A week after the last Republican presidential debate, the candidates and networks are still debating rules and procedures for future debates. What will it take to break the impasse? Also, Pandora picks up ‘Serial,’ South By Southwest tries, unsuccessfully, to dig out Gamergate session controversies, and KBIA adopts a full-time news format.. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The organizers of the South By Southwest conference announced they’re canceling two sessions for the Spring 2016 conference. Both sessions were to focus on issues related to the Gamergate scandal, which centered on the depiction of women in the video gaming industry. Also, Vice President Joe Biden’s claims ‘people’ made up a ‘Hollywood moment’ between him and son Beau, covering Hillary Clinton’s Benghazi testimony, and what’s potentially behind those layoffs at ESPN. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The organizers of the South By Southwest conference announced they’re canceling two sessions for the Spring 2016 conference. Both sessions were to focus on issues related to the Gamergate scandal, which centered on the depiction of women in the video gaming industry.

Hugh Forrest, South by Southwest: “Strong Community Management: Why we canceled two panels for SXSW 2016

  One guy says the reporting isn’t accurate. Another says it is. It’s a case of finger pointing between Amazon vice president Jay Carney and New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet. What is the environment really like in the Amazon headquarters? Also, CNBC gets ‘Trump’ed, Cosby Kids Malcolm-Jamal Warner and Raven-Simone react to the November Ebony cover, and how the NFL Network became the butt of many jokes.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Wonderlane

One guy says the reporting isn’t accurate. Another says it is. It’s a case of finger pointing between Amazon vice president Jay Carney and New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet. What is the environment really like in the Amazon headquarters?

Jay Carney, Medium: “What the New York Times didn’t tell you

For 62 years, people have been saying they read Playboy for the articles, but do they really? We’ll find out soon enough, now that the magazine’s decision to eliminate nude photographs. Also, Jason Rezaian’s guilty verdict in Iran, BuzzFeed goes “native” and a look back on the Democrats first debate. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Reuben Stern: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Matthew Hurst

For 62 years, people have been saying they read Playboy for the articles, but do they really? We’ll find out soon enough, now that the magazine’s decision to eliminate nude photographs.

Ravi Somaiya, New York Times: “Playboy to drop nudity as internet fills demand

New York Times: “Playboy in popular culture

In Roseburg, Ore., the Douglas County Sheriff says the public won’t ever hear him utter the shooter’s name so as not to give him the fame and attention he sought. As the ‘No Notoriety’ campaign gains steam, journalists find themselves at odds with it. Also, President Obama the nation’s assignment editor-in-chief, Hillary Clinton’s NBC appearances and covering the “1,000-year flood” in South Carolina. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Reuben Stern and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

In the hours and days following the last week's massacre at Umpqua Community College, many called on the media not to name the shooter. The idea? Not to give him the attention and fame he was seeking in carrying out the act. But, there are many in the journalism community who say that while they can respect the concept of the 'No Notoriety' campaign, we'd be betraying the basic tenants of our profession if we adhered.

  Was the coverage too much? Too little? Or just right? Also, farming out editorials, lessons learned after a tv station used a Nazi emblem in a Yom Kippur graphic, a boo boo in Yogi Berra’s obituary and more. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user pml2008

Pope Francis made his first trip the United States. For five days, he met with dignitaries, church officials, Catholics and members of the public. And, for those five days, the cable networks were practically wall-to-wall. Was the coverage too much? Too little? Or just right?

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