Views of the News

Courtesy Starbucks

Coffee giant Starbucks and USA Today have teamed up to start a nationwide conversation about race. Baristas as encouraged to write "#RaceTogether" on drink cups and initiate conversations with customers about racial issues. Friday, there will be a special section in the print editions of the USA Today. That supplement will also be available in Starbucks retail locations.

  Hillary Clinton said she used a personal address while Secretary of State as a manner of convenience, so that she wouldn't need to carry more than one mobile device. It’s an explanation that drew skepticism at Tuesday’s news conference. Also, tech blog Gigaom goes belly up, how you can access HBO without a cable subscription, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Selma march and why a television news reporter decided to thank a public information officer on the air. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Bureau of IIP

Hillary Clinton told reporters Tuesday she chose to use a private email address for her communications while Secretary of State out of convenience.  She maintains she did nothing wrong, but does wish she had done things differently.

Erik Wemple, Washington Post: “With Clinton quip, Kerry expresses his attitude toward open records

  What’s the appropriate way for the news media to cover a suicide? Last week, when Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, it was front-page news. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch released a voicemail Schweich left for Editorial Page Editor Tony Messenger moments before firing the shot. Was publishing a violation of Shweich’s privacy or in the best interest of the public?  Also, Hillary Clinton’s private email address, and update on new allegations against Bill O’Reilly, unmasking ‘Jihadi John’ and how BuzzFeed nearly broke the internet with #TheDress. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Judd Slivka: Views of the News.


State of Missouri

What is the appropriate way for the news media to cover a suicide? Last week, when Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, it was front-page news. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch released a voicemail Schweich left for Editorial Page Editor Tony Messenger moments before firing the shot. Was publishing a violation of Shweich’s privacy or in the best interest of the public? 

  Did Bill O’Reilly lie about his experiences reporting during the Falklands War? A story in Mother Jones claims the Fox News Channel host lied about his whereabouts during coverage of the 1982 conflict for CBS News.  We’ll talk about what former colleagues say about that time and what O’Reilly is saying about it.  Also, editors at the New York Times drop the legendary Page One meetings, why the Toronto Star backed off its reporting on the HPV vaccine and the job outlook for journalism graduates. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Judd Slivka: Views of the News.


  The past week was a shock for many journalists: the sudden deaths of CBS correspondent Bob Simon and New York Times media columnist David Carr, the fallout from Brian Williams suspension and Jon Stewart’s impending departure from “The Daily Show.” What have we lost and what will we most remember? Also, clues from the FAA on how it will regulate the use of drones, why we still televise car chases live, and 40 years of “Saturday Night Live.” From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.


This was a week that was hard on many in the media world, with the sudden deaths of both David Carr and Bob Simon, the suspension of Brian Williams, and word that Jon Stewart would be leaving "The Daily Show."

Former Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein told CNN's Brian Stelter that these four stories all tie together, as we come together to strive to tell the best version of the truth.

  NBC’s Brian Williams’ apology wasn’t enough to keep the network from suspending him for six months without pay. What’s likely to happen come August? Will he return to anchor Nightly News, or move on? Some journalists are standing by Williams while others say his credibility is shot, and he’s dragging NBC News down with him. Why does it seem some broadcast journalists are more understanding while print and online journalists aren’t cutting Williams any slack? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user David Shankbone

NBC suspended Nightly News Managing Editor and anchor Brian Williams for six months, without pay, after he was found to have misrepresented events which occurred while on assignment in Iraq in 2003.

Williams has repeatedly described reporting from Iraq when the Chinook helicopter he was in took fire from an RPG attack.  Last week, Stars and Stripes reported it had proof Williams account of that attack was not factual.

Williams apologized.  But, that's led many to question the validity of his other reports and his journalistic credibility.

The measles outbreak and the debate over childhood vaccinations turns political. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) told CNBC’s Kelly Evans he’s heard of cases in which vaccines have caused “profound mental disorders.” Also, why President Obama is urging House Democrats to avoid the Huffington Post, the motivation behind Newsweek’s provocative cover on sexism in Silicon Valley, journalist Peter Greste is freed from an Egyptian prison, and the best of the worst of the Super Bowl ads. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Wikimedia

More than 100 people have contracted measles, most exposed after visits to Disneyland. The resurgence of the illness has given new life to the debate over whether parents should vaccinate their children. This week, that debate became political. While most government leaders are urging people to inoculate their children, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), himself a medical doctor, told CNBC he's known of cases in which vaccines have caused "profound medical disorders."

Overblowing #Blizzard2015

Jan 29, 2015
CNN

 Many news outlets this past week were going on and on about all the snow the east coast was going to get. Turns out, only parts of the east coast had more than two feet of snow. The big question was, is this a national or regional story? From Don Lemon going all over New York City in the CNN Blizzardmobile to reporters up to their waists in the snow. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA's media criticism program, "Views of the News.” 


Parts of the east coast were clobbered by more than two feet of snow.  But is it a national story or a regional one? From live reporters up to their waists in fallen snow to the CNN Blizzardmobile driving around during a statewide travel ban, we’ll break down the coverage. Indiana’s governor announces plans for a new state-run news agency, drawing criticism from journalists comparing it to North Korea and the former Soviet Union, why a gangster rapper’s lyrics could land him 25 years to life in prison, and a look ahead at Sunday’s Super Bowl telecast. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

The French publication Charlie Hebdo has a long history of publishing controversial cartoons. But after an attack on its offices that left 10 staff and two police officers dead, news organizations are grappling with the ethics of reprinting those same cartoons. The graphic depictions may provide relevant context, yet are deeply offensive to many of the Muslim faith. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the publication on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."


It was a big night for the cast and crew of both Boyhood and the Amazon series Transparent, as each walked away with two Golden Globe awards Sunday. The CW Network received its first Golden Globe for Gina Rodriguez's performance in Jane the Virgin. Yet with only one award given to the major broadcast networks,  ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox were left out in the cold. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the Golden Globes and the future of television on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

It’s been more than a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out its first edition, again with a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the cover.  Who is republishing the cartoons? Who isn’t? Is it possible to give this story context without using it? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Valentina Cala

It's been a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out is first edition since the January 7, 2015 shooting that left 12 dead.  On its cover: another cartoon showing the image of the Prophet Mohammed.  What message are editors trying to send?

Serial promo image
Chicago Public Media

The podcast Serial, created by the staff of This American Life, ended its first season in mid-December with an estimated 40 million downloads. A year in the making, reporter Sarah Koenig was ultimately unable to decide whether high school student Adnan Syed, now serving a life sentence, was guilty of murdering his ex-girlfriend 15 years ago. The key witness in the case, Jay Wilds, refused to give Koenig an on-tape interview. But last week The Intercept got Wilds to talk. What he said about Koenig led opponents and defenders to debate her journalistic integrity. Bob Priddy joined Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry and Mike McKean to discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."


Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

On Tuesday, January 7, French authorities confirmed three gunman shot and killed 12 people in Paris at the offices of the weekly satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The paper has run cartoons and other content satirizing radical Islam, and the Prophet Mohammed. In 2011, the paper was firebombed. 

French President Francois Holland called the shootings a "terrorist attack of the most extreme barbarity" and video shows armed gunman running through the streets of Paris. As of the shows' recording, the suspects remain at large. 

  A gunman targets Paris weekly Charlie Hebdo known for satirizing Islam and the prophet Mohammed.  Also, a preview of the legislative session now underway in Jefferson City, why Kirby Delauter doesn’t want his name in the press,  the historical accuracy of the film Selma, and remembering ESPN’s Stuart Scott.  From the Missouri School of Journalism, Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Bob Priddy: Views of the News.


Jacky Naegelen / Reuters

Catch our show today at 6:30pm on KBIA

Terrorists Kill 12 at Paris Paper

Three gunmen killed 12 people and injured several more at a weekly Paris newspaper that has satirized Islam and the prophet Mohammed.

Nicholas Vinocur and Antony Paone, Reuters, "At least 12 dead in Paris attack on satirical newspaper"

  A New York City high school student makes $72 million playing the stock market? The headline offered the promise of a story that was almost too good to be true. Turns out the teen, Mohammed Islam, made up the whole story. It joins an increasingly long list of prominent stories unraveling due to fact checking.  Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

Courtesy NBC

  When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including waterboarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  Are the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques torture? Former Vice President Dick Cheney gives Chuck Todd his definition of “torture” on Meet the Press. The Cosbys break their silence, MSNBC launches “The Shift” to test new programming online, and New York Magazine is duped by a high school student. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including water boarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. 

The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use.

via Flickr user Bob Mical

  

Rolling Stone has issued an apology for its November story, "A rape on campus: A brutal assault and struggle for justice at UVA," saying that the magazine didn't do enough in verifying an unidentified student's account of sexual assault. Was Sabrina Rubin Erdely's reporting flawed? Why didn't she interview the accused? What did the fact-checking look like on that article?  And, why did Rolling Stone quietly change its apology, removing the statement the magazine "misplaced" its trust in "Jackie?” 

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.

 

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via Flickr user Bob Mical

Rolling Stone has issued an apology for its November story, "A rape on campus: A brutal assault and struggle for justice at UVA," saying that the magazine didn't do enough in verifying an unidentified student's account of sexual assault. 

IMDB

The film, The Immitation Game, carries a PG-13 rating and The New York Times warns the film contains illicit sex, cataclysmic violence & advanced math?! Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

 


via Flickr user Gordon Correll

Comedian Chris Rock is on a publicity tour, promoting his new film Top Five. In multiple interviews Rock is asked about his reactions to the recent events in Ferguson and his take on racism in America. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

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