Views of the News

Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

It’s been a historic week at the University of Missouri. On Monday, Tim Wolfe resigned as president of the UM System. Hours later, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced he is stepping down from that office at the end of the year. We’ll look at local, regional and national media coverage, talk about challenges to the First Amendment, and examine the role of Mizzou Football.

A week after the last Republican presidential debate, the candidates and networks are still debating rules and procedures for future debates. What will it take to break the impasse? Also, Pandora picks up ‘Serial,’ South By Southwest tries, unsuccessfully, to dig out Gamergate session controversies, and KBIA adopts a full-time news format.. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The organizers of the South By Southwest conference announced they’re canceling two sessions for the Spring 2016 conference. Both sessions were to focus on issues related to the Gamergate scandal, which centered on the depiction of women in the video gaming industry. Also, Vice President Joe Biden’s claims ‘people’ made up a ‘Hollywood moment’ between him and son Beau, covering Hillary Clinton’s Benghazi testimony, and what’s potentially behind those layoffs at ESPN. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The organizers of the South By Southwest conference announced they’re canceling two sessions for the Spring 2016 conference. Both sessions were to focus on issues related to the Gamergate scandal, which centered on the depiction of women in the video gaming industry.

Hugh Forrest, South by Southwest: “Strong Community Management: Why we canceled two panels for SXSW 2016

  One guy says the reporting isn’t accurate. Another says it is. It’s a case of finger pointing between Amazon vice president Jay Carney and New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet. What is the environment really like in the Amazon headquarters? Also, CNBC gets ‘Trump’ed, Cosby Kids Malcolm-Jamal Warner and Raven-Simone react to the November Ebony cover, and how the NFL Network became the butt of many jokes.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Wonderlane

One guy says the reporting isn’t accurate. Another says it is. It’s a case of finger pointing between Amazon vice president Jay Carney and New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet. What is the environment really like in the Amazon headquarters?

Jay Carney, Medium: “What the New York Times didn’t tell you

For 62 years, people have been saying they read Playboy for the articles, but do they really? We’ll find out soon enough, now that the magazine’s decision to eliminate nude photographs. Also, Jason Rezaian’s guilty verdict in Iran, BuzzFeed goes “native” and a look back on the Democrats first debate. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Reuben Stern: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Matthew Hurst

For 62 years, people have been saying they read Playboy for the articles, but do they really? We’ll find out soon enough, now that the magazine’s decision to eliminate nude photographs.

Ravi Somaiya, New York Times: “Playboy to drop nudity as internet fills demand

New York Times: “Playboy in popular culture

In Roseburg, Ore., the Douglas County Sheriff says the public won’t ever hear him utter the shooter’s name so as not to give him the fame and attention he sought. As the ‘No Notoriety’ campaign gains steam, journalists find themselves at odds with it. Also, President Obama the nation’s assignment editor-in-chief, Hillary Clinton’s NBC appearances and covering the “1,000-year flood” in South Carolina. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Reuben Stern and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

In the hours and days following the last week's massacre at Umpqua Community College, many called on the media not to name the shooter. The idea? Not to give him the attention and fame he was seeking in carrying out the act. But, there are many in the journalism community who say that while they can respect the concept of the 'No Notoriety' campaign, we'd be betraying the basic tenants of our profession if we adhered.

  Was the coverage too much? Too little? Or just right? Also, farming out editorials, lessons learned after a tv station used a Nazi emblem in a Yom Kippur graphic, a boo boo in Yogi Berra’s obituary and more. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user pml2008

Pope Francis made his first trip the United States. For five days, he met with dignitaries, church officials, Catholics and members of the public. And, for those five days, the cable networks were practically wall-to-wall. Was the coverage too much? Too little? Or just right?

  The hunter is being the hunted. Donald Trump is still the clear GOP front runner, at least according to the latest Washington Post-ABC News poll.  But, that same poll suggests six in ten Americans think Trump is not qualified to hold the job. Still, he's getting a ton of media coverage. Is he too rich to ignore? Also, turmoil for Tribune Publishing, stormy times at the Weather Channel, why the Washington Post is rethinking it video strategy and more. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

The hunter is being the hunted. Donald Trump is still the clear GOP front runner, at least according to the latest Washington Post-ABC News poll.  But, that same poll suggests six in ten Americans think Trump is not qualified to hold the job. Still, he's getting a ton of media coverage. Is he too rich to ignore?

Gabriel Arana, Huffington Post: “Even the CNN staff is sick of the wall-to-wall Trump coverage

  Images of war are often graphic and gruesome. They evoke personal, emotional reactions – and often we choose not to publish them because of the depths of truth they show. And, sometimes when we do publish them, we can change the course of history. Some are saying the photos of 3-year-old Ayland Kurdi’s body washed up on a Turkish beach could be the next iconic photo to influence public thinking – much like the 1972 image of the girl fleeing a napalm attack in Vietnam. Also, the media circus around Kentucky clerk Kim Davis’ jailing, why Stephen Colbert’s return to late night and why Aretha Franklin doesn’t want you to see the documentary ‘Amazing Grace.’ From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

  It seems every few weeks we’re talking about another shooting incident. Why is that? MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough puts the blame on the 24-hour cable news networks. Is it a fair criticism? Also, President Obama’s appearance on an NBC reality show, press freedoms challenged at student publications across the country, and athletic teams’ game changing decision regarding access for credentialed journalists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy WDBJ-TV

Who is the blame for the shooting deaths of WDBJ-TV journalists Alison Parker and Adam Ward? The easy answer to that question is the shooter -- but is there a deeper, more nuanced answer? Some point the finger at the gun lobby, others point it at failings in the mental health system. MSNBC's Joe Scarborough says it's the fault the of the 24-hour cable news networks.

  Details are still coming together in Roanoke, Va., where a disgruntled former employee shot and killed a reporter and photographer live on the air. Also, Cox’s Rare Media posts a job looking for a reporter that’s “less Paula Zahn, more Zoe Barnes.” It’s a House of Cards reference to a young, driven reporter willing to work sources – intimately -- to get her story. And, is it ethical to identify names of Ashley Madison subscribers obtained through theft, drama on CNBC and when journalists should turn into activists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Hackers stole hook-up site Ashley Madison's member database and made it searchable online. Since that happened, media outlets around the world have been scouring the data and identifying users. Is it ethical for journalists to publish the data, given it's been made available to them via illegal means?

Chava Gourarie, Columbia Journalism Review: “Is it ethical to write about hacked Ashley Madison users?

Emotions are running high 10 years after Hurricane Katrina made landfall on New Orleans, so what was a Chicago Tribune columnist thinking when she wrote that she prayed for a storm like Katrina to wipe out Chicago? Also, how Pro-Publica and the New York Times worked together to determine a special relationship between AT&T and the National Security Agency, Sesame Street’s move to HBO and more. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy Chicago Tribune

At a time when so many are writing anniversary stories looking back on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina,  Chicago Tribune columnist Kristen McQueary wrote a column under the headline "In Chicago, Wishing for a Hurricane Katrina."

That headline was changed after readers took great offense to McQueary's assertion that the city of Chicago needs a storm the size and strength of Katrina to reset the city's mounting debt, it's struggling schools and it's political infighting.

People in Ferguson and across the country marked the one-year anniversary of the police-involved shooting death of Michael Brown. What’s changed? What hasn’t? And how is it the media is still so tied to the center of this story? Donald Trump continues to steal the headlines in the GOP presidential push, investigative powerhouse ProPublica teams up with the online review site, Yelp, and Jon Stewart issues us all a challenge. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The New York Times has had to walk back its story on a "criminal" probe of Hillary Clinton's private email server while the paper is vigorously defending another of its exclusives...on abuses in the nail salon industry.  The first Republican presidential debate is only a week away.  Some wonder whether all the scrambling to meet the Fox News criteria for inclusion is worth the trouble.  More bad news for the newspaper business: major layoffs and poor performance with minority employment.  Media companies are embracing a new revenue source that raises ethical questions.  And research shows "visual" news sites are more successful.

  Is any publicity good publicity for Donald Trump?  He’s certainly testing that proposition with his attack on John McCain’s war record.  And some say the media are depriving more serious presidential contenders of oxygen by focusing so much on the real estate mogul and reality TV star.  Amateur drones are getting in the way of California firefighters.  The publisher of the celebrity gossip site Gawker pulls a salacious story, prompting two of his editors to quit.  Critics accuse journalists of being too quick to blame sexism for the resignation of Reddit’s CEO.  And Harper Lee’s new novel raises some difficult questions for reviewers.  It’s Views of the News with Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Lynda Kraxberger and Jamie Grey.

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions. Also, the Kansas City Star reports on a culture of sexual harassment at the state capitol and a look at a wave of compassionate acts among competing newsrooms. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Amanda Hinnant: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Quinn Dombrowski

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions on marriage equality, the death penalty, health care subsidies, and more.

Pop rocker Taylor Swift takes a bite out of Apple, forcing the company to revise its royalty payment plans for the new Apple Music streaming system. What lessons could journalists take from her demand for fair pay? Also, the deadly shooting at Emanuel AME Church reignited the national conversation about race, but has the media done its job to move that conversation forward. And, you can take the “interim” off Lester Holt’s title as anchor of NBC Nightly News. We’ll look at what’s ahead for the network as Brian Williams’ suspension expires and he moves to MSNBC. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Jana Beamer

Less than 24 hours after pop rocker Taylor Swift told Apple she'd withhold her hit album, 1989, from the new Apple Music streaming service, the company revised its plan for royalty payouts. Originally, Apple wasn't planning to pay record labels royalties for streams during the free three-month trial period.

Taylor Swift: “To Apple, Love Taylor

  A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. Also, how an Arkansas judge’s alternative sentencing stands to affect one television station’s editorial product, why Glenn Greenwald says a story in the Sunday Times is “the opposite of journalism,” and the experiment to drive home the importance of mobile at the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.

Courtesy KXLY-TV

A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. What is it like to ask questions of someone when you know it'll likely change the course of their life forever? Has the media been fair to Rachel Dolezal, her experience and her story?

Jeff Humphrey, KXLY: "First on KXLY: Rachel Dolezal responds to race allegations"

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