Views of the News

As the violence escalates in Iraq, there’s a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act. What do Wolfowitz, Bremer, McCain and Graham have to say today that’s different than before the 2003 invasion of Iraq? Also, Eric Cantor’s primary defeat catches the national press off guard, another CNN documentary raises questions about transparency and authenticity, and Chelsea Clinton’s $600,000 paycheck. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Margaret Duffy: Views of the News.

As the violence escalates in Iraq at the hands of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), there's a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act.  What to Paul Wolfowitz, Paul Bremer, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) have to say today that's different than prior to the 2003 invasion of Iraq?

Jack Mirkinson, Huffington Post: “Iraq hawks are still dominating the media debate

jajah / Flickr

  The folks at the online dating site eHarmony have some advice for people looking for Mr. or Ms. Right -- journalists make great life partners! Missouri School of Journalism professors Katherine Reed, Mike McKean and Amy Simons talk about the positives and negatives of dating a journalist.

Keith Allison / Flickr

Did George Will go too far, writing in his Washington Post column that being a sexual assault victim has become a "coveted status" on college campuses? Missouri School of Journalism professors Katherine Reed, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Did George Will go too far, writing in his Washington Post column that being a sexual assault victim has become a “coveted status” on college campuses? Also, American Express commissions Tyler Perry for its latest commercial produced in the style of a documentary film, Time Inc.’s risky split from Time Warner, and why e-Harmony says reporters make good dates. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.

Flickr user Keith Allison

In a column published in the Friday, June 6 editions of the Washington Post, George F. Will wrote about what he considers a spread of progressivism at American colleges and universities. 

He drew the ire of many when he wrote of what he calls the "supposed campus epidemic of rape, a.k.a. sexual assault."  He attributes the number of reported to increased political correctness on campuses, and that when "making victimhood a coveted status that confers privileges, victims proliferate."

When a minor is charged with a heinous crime

Jun 7, 2014
ABC7 Chicago

  Prosecutors say two 12-year-old southeastern Wisconsin girls stabbed their 12-year-old friend nearly to death in the woods to please a mythological creature they learned about online. The girls have been charged as adults. Should the media publish their names and show their faces in its coverage? Missouri School of Journalism faculty Amy Simons, Lynda Kraxberger and Jim Flink discuss the issue.

Marcus Qwertyus / Wikimedia Commons

  The Columbia Missourian announced it is dropping its paywall revenue model, replacing it with a new survey model. Readers will be able to access content -- and share it on social media -- after taking a short Google survey. Missouri School of Journalism faculty Amy Simons, Lynda Kraxberger and Jim Flink discuss the issue.

The complicated story of Bowe Bergdahl's release

Jun 6, 2014
U.S. Army Photo

  On Saturday, May 31, President Barack Obama stood on the White House lawn flanked by Bergdahl's parents, to annnounce his release. Since then, the story has taken several twists and turns. Missouri School of Journalism faculty Amy Simons, Lynda Kraxberger and Jim Flink discuss the issue.

Hero or deserter? Negotiating with terrorists? The story of Bowe Bergdahl’s release has taken several twists since President Obama’s announcement Saturday afternoon.  Also, how young is too young when showing images of children facing adult criminal charges, a CNN reporter arrested on live television, and remembering Tiananmen Square 25 years later. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Lynda Kraxberger and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

U.S. Army photo

It was 2009 when Army Pfc. Bowe Bergdahl was captured and held as a prisoner of war in Afghanistan.  Saturday, President Barack Obama stood on the White House lawn flanked by Bergdahl's parents, to annnounce his release.

The Taliban freed Bergdahl as part of a prisoner swap.  In exchange for his release, the U.S. government agreed to release five prisoners from Guantanamo Bay.

Many news organizations ran Eliott Rodger's YouTube video as part of their coverage of the Isla Vista shootings. How is that different than publishing a suicide note? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the national and local media's response. 

The tales of two papers: how one student newspaper on the campus of University of California – Santa Barbara covered a mass shooting while the other chose to ignore it. Also, NBC’s sit down with Edward Snowden, dangerous conditions for reporters in Ukraine, CNN anchors moving to New York, and avoiding conflicts of interest – real and perceived. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

  

Why was Jill Abramson fired as executive editor the New York Times? Her story doesn’t mesh with that of Publisher Arthur Sulzberger. Was it over a pay dispute as she claims or about a management style Sulzberger says didn’t fit the newsroom? And, why does it even matter? Also, a covering executions in Missouri, the on again-off again OWN documentary on Michael Sam’s quest to make the St. Louis Rams and Michael Jackson’s hologram performance on the Billboard Music Awards. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

via Wikimedia user Haxorjoe

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Why was Jill Abramson fired as executive editor the New York Times? Her story doesn’t mesh with that of Publisher Arthur Sulzberger. Was it over a pay dispute as she claims or about a management style Sulzberger says didn’t fit the newsroom?

Ken Auletta, New Yorker: “Why Jill Abramson was fired

Courtesy ESPN/NFL Films

Michael Sam made history, becoming the first openly gay football player to be drafted into the NFL.  Saturday, the St. Louis Rams used their seventh round pick to take Sam, giving him a chance to make the team later this summer.

ESPN has a crew with Sam while he watched the draft and awaited word of his future.  And, when the call came from Rams head coach Jeff Fisher, the network decided to air Sam's emotional response in its entirety, live on on television.

Monica Lewinsky is breaking her silence, writing in Vanity Fair that it’s time to “burn the beret and blue dress.” After 17 years, why did she choose to speak out now about her affair with President Bill Clinton?  Also, journalists rubbing elbows with politicians at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, how local, national and international coverage varied during last week’s controversial execution in Oklahoma, and coverage of the kidnapped Nigerian girls. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.


On Thursday, May 8, the new issue of Vanity Fair will hit newsstands.  Inside, there will be an item penned by former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.  After 17 years, she's breaking her silence and talking about her affair with President Bill Clinton and what her life has been like since it became public.

Vanity Fair: “Exclusive: Monica Lewinsky writes about her affair with President Clinton

Clippers owner Donald Sterling, banned from basketball for life for making racist comments.  How did TMZ get the scoop that rocked professional sports?  E-mails between producers of ‘Chicagoland’ and Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office show some storylines on the CNN docu-series may have been staged. Also, Indy Star’s #ShowUsYourGuns and a look back at NPR’s first foray on the internet. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling has been banned for life from the National Basketball Association and fined $2.5 million for making racists comments.

Gossip site TMZ broke the story, publishing a recording of an argument between Sterling an an ex-girlfriend, V. Stiviano.

NBC tries to get inside David Gregory’s mind, hiring a psychological consultant to ask his wife and friends what makes him tick. How might that translate into higher ratings?  Also, the Supreme Court hears arguments in the Aereo case, publishing criminal mug shots, and reporting on acts of anti-Semitism in the U.S. and abroad. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News. 


WallyG / FLICKR

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in the case of American Broadcasting Companies v. Aereo.

For more than two years, broadcast and cable companies have argued Aereo's subscription-based streaming of local programming is a violation of copyright.

Aereo maintains its use of mini-antennae allows users to tune in signals already available to them using over-the-air tuners.

Journalists often end up catching illegal activity on video or in photographs? When should they turn those images over to law enforcement? Also, Sen. Al Franken’s fight against the Comcast-Time Warner merger, coverage the Boston Bombing anniversary and why a big-city newspaper nixed reader comments from its website . From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink.

Relux via Flickr

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) is the leading voice in Congress, urging colleagues to say no to the proposed merger between Comcast and Time-Warner.

If allowed, the merger will combine the nation's number one and number two cable and internet providers -- something that Franken says is bad for consumers and bad for America.

Ashley Parker, New York Times: “Franken’s campaign against Comcast is no joke

via Twitter

Last week, Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus was shot and killed while on assignment in Afghanistan.  She was traveling with a convoy of election workers ahead of the presidential election when an Afgan police officer open fire on Niedringhaus and her reporter.

Afghanistan is a war zone.

Houston, Texas isn't.

What the #$%^?

Apr 2, 2014

What the $%^#?  Society’s attitudes toward language have evolved, and words once considered profane are now part of the vernacular.  Still, do they have a place in the newspaper or on local tv newscasts?  Also the cancel Colbert movement, and 2014 State of the News Media report. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.


stock78/flickr

When is it appropriate for a journalist to change a word in a direct quote?  Is it okay to edit for clarity? Or when someone uses profanity?  What defines profanity today?

Media criticism and critique from Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean.

Aero Icarus/Flickr

What happened to Malaysia Airlines flight 370?  All we know for sure is that it left Kuala Lampur on Friday, March 8 and never made it to its destination, the Beijing Capital International airport.  It's a mystery leaving millions around the globe scratching their heads.  The American media is reporting every small detail -- many of them theories and rumors. 

Media criticism and critique from Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons and Earnest Perry, with special guest panelist Lee Wilkins.

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