voting rights

A federal appeals court in Denver is scheduled to hear arguments Aug. 25 in a dispute over whether Kansas and Arizona can require voters using a federal registration form to show proof of citizenship.

It's the first of several significant cases this fall that could determine who gets to vote, and how, in at least six states. The outcomes could also answer a much broader question: Who gets to decide?

prison cell
mikecogh / Flickr

  Advocates for felons’ rights recently gained significant support from U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. Holder asked states to repeal laws prohibiting convicted felons from voting after serving their prison sentences. University of Missouri Law Professor S. David Mitchell said many of the states’ current voting restrictions on felons contradict the goal for these individuals once they are released from prison.

Vox Efx / Flickr

Legislation requiring voters to show photo ID at polling places is scheduled for debate in the Missouri House.
House Majority Leader John Diehl said he expects a proposed constitutional amendment mandating photo ID and a bill implementing the rule to be taken up on the House floor this week.

Republicans argue the measure is needed to cut down on voter fraud. Democrats contend the photo ID requirement is aimed at disenfranchising voters.

The University of Missouri Faculty Council addressed a voting rights proposal to non-tenure track, or NTT faculty at its most recent meeting in Memorial Student Union.

The change will allow NTT faculty to vote on University matters. NTT faculty members are hired under one- or three-year contracts. The exclusion of NTT members has ocurred for years at MU, but has now been brought to the council as a proposal.