wikileaks

Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

Last year, former Army private Bradley Manning, now known as Chelsea Manning, was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. The sentence, which is the longest ever imposed in a leak case in the U.S., is amplifying the debate over the Obama administration’s prosecution of government employees who leak classified information to the public. 

Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

On Wednesday, former Army private Bradley Manning, now known as Chelsea Manning, was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. The sentence, which is the longest ever imposed in a leak case in the U.S., is amplifying the debate over the Obama administration’s prosecution of government employees who leak classified information to the public. 

When do security concerns trump free speech? When should whistleblowers be sent to jail, along with the journalists who report on their leaks?