workplace discrimination

Josh Kronberg-Rasner was the only openly gay person in his office while he worked for a food service company in Casper, Wyo. But his sexual orientation never held him back, he says. "I had filled every position from general manager to executive chef," he says. "You name it, I'd done all of it."

That changed in the summer of 2012 when Kronberg-Rasner got a new manager, whom Kronberg-Rasner says was uncomfortable working with a gay person. A few weeks after he arrived, the manager went through Kronberg-Rasner's personal phone and found pictures of a male gymnast.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A Missouri senator is calling on the Legislature to bar discrimination based on sexual orientation in light of a former University of Missouri football player's decision to publicly come out as gay.

Photo by JUZ(c) via Flickr

 

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is asking the state's Republican-led Legislature to bar discrimination based on sexual orientation.

But the measure's chances of passing are unclear. Some Republicans expressed caution Wednesday and criticized Nixon for championing the proposal while ignoring other policy initiatives.

Current state law prohibits discrimination in employment based on race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, sex and disability.

Testimony was heard today on legislation that would redefine what constitutes workplace discrimination in Missouri.

If passed, workplace discrimination would have to be a motivating factor, not just a contributing one, in any wrongful action taken against a worker by an employer, which is the current federal standard.  Attorney Rich AuBuchon spoke in favor of the bill on behalf of his former employer, the Missouri Chamber of Commerce.  He told the House Committee on Workforce Development and Workplace Safety that the state’s current definition of discrimination is hurting Missouri’s economy.

state capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A Missouri House committee is considering legislation making it harder for employees to win lawsuits over workplace discrimination.

A State House committee began a hearing Tuesday into a stripped-down version of the workplace discrimination bill. 

The Missouri Senate has given final approval to legislation changing the rules for lawsuits over workplace discrimination.

File / KBIA

Missouri Republican lawmakers and Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon appear headed for a debate over workplace discrimination laws and a requirement to show a photo ID at the polls.

File / KBIA

The Missouri Senate has passed legislation that would redefine what constitutes discrimination in the workplace. The vote was a mere formality following last week’s battle to kill the bill.

Newscast for February 9, 2012

Feb 9, 2012
File / KBIA

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Alyssa Bustamante sentenced to life in prison
  • A workplace discrimination reform bill passes the Missouri Senate
  • Gov. Jay Nixon on his recent decrease in cuts to higher education
Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

Senate Democrats have ended their filibuster of a workplace discrimination bill, after an agreement was reached with the bill’s sponsor.  But that doesn’t mean they won’t try blocking the bill again.

Democrat Maria Chappelle-Nadal agreed to end the filibuster after the bill’s sponsor, GOP Senator Brad Lager, allowed her to add an amendment – that amendment would guarantee the right to a jury trial in all workplace discrimination cases.  She says, though, that the bill’s definition of what constitutes workplace discrimination is still flawed.

david_shane / Flickr

The Legislative Black Caucus is vowing to fight attempts in both the Missouri House and Senate to pass Republican-sponsored workplace discrimination bills. As St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin tells us, both Senate and House bills would redefine discrimination as a motivating factor in actions taken against an employee:

A group of Democratic State Senators is blocking a bill that would redefine Missouri’s workplace discrimination standards.  They believe the bill will undo nearly a half-century of civil rights progress.

Newscast for January 26, 2012

Jan 26, 2012

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • $27 million in grant money to health insurance exchange in Missouri has come to a complete halt
  • Missouri democrats block weak workplace discrimination bill in State Senate
  • ACLU sues St. Louis for inmate grievances
  • Big trucks on small roads--cattlemen vs. MoDOT
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Legislation that would change Missouri’s workplace discrimination standards is getting attention this week by both State House and Senate members.