Election 2012

KBIA's coverage of all the elections going on in mid-Missouri and the nation for 2012.

Adair County residents will vote for a Second District County Commissioner Tuesday.

Larry Lee Smith is challenging the incumbent Mark Thompson in the election for Adair County Second District Commissioner.

Smith, who’s a farmer, said he decided to run for the position because he is concerned with road and bridge maintenance in Adair County.

“I don’t like to hear cutbacks on our road and bridge employees and on an hourly basis and so I don’t know what happened to their budget, how they failed to get something in?" Smith said. "I just want to scan that budget.”

Located on the main street of Paris, Missouri, Jonesy’s Café has been drawing locals for its coffee, breakfast and old-fashioned soda fountain since the 1930s. Owners Steven and Connie Hancock say it’s a place where everyone feels at home. We arrived at the crack of dawn to find Connie firing up the grill, waiting for the usual mix of farmers, workers, retirees  and opinions to find their way into the café as they do each morning. What’s on the table at Jonesy’s? Not surprisingly, a good deal of disillusionment with politicians and a political process.

Courtesy electiondaycommunion.org.

 

During the day on Tuesday, Memorial Baptist Church in Columbia will function as a polling place. But after the polls close, Pastor Kevin Glenn hopes to bring voters from all different perspectives together.

  “People of faith have become known more for their political affiliation than for their proclamation of the way of Jesus and his ethic of unconditional love,“ he said.

Boone County's Prop 1 aims to improve youth services

Nov 2, 2012
Sean Hobson / Flickr

On Tuesday’s ballot, Boone county residents will decide on whether to introduce a Community Children’s Service Fund to improve mental health and shelter services for youth under 19 years of age.

Claire McCaskill
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

KBIA’s Kristofor Husted interviews Sen. Claire McCaskill, who is challenging Rep. Todd Akin to keep her seat in the U.S. Senate in the November 6 election.

In the interview (which took place before McCaskill’s mother died), the senator talks about the difference between her and Akin when it comes to women’s issues including equal pay for women and access to emergency contraception. She talks about what she would say to women who have backed Akin after his controversial comment on pregnancy and rape. McCaskill also discusses her plan to make sure small business continues to grow in the state and her stance on keeping federal loans and grants available to students who depend on them.

Claire McCaskill
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

McCaskill spoke outside a St. Louis County grade school Wednesday about the importance of the school lunch program, noting that Republican opponent Todd Akin was one of just five lawmakers to oppose funding. But she also used the time to talk about her mother, who passed away earlier this week.

It was Claire McCaskill’s first public appearance since the passing of her mother, Betty Anne Ward McCaskill.

In previous campaigns, the Senator would often bring her mother up on the stump.

Claire McCaskill said it’s been a “tumultuous time.”

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Countdown to Election Day is upon us.

And while business development continues to surge as a hot topic this campaign season, the expired farm bill seems to have disappeared off candidates' radars completely. Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer has this report on just how much candidates are talking farm policy...in farm country.

By most accounts, Missouri is a pink state.

Not red. Not blue. Pink.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri election officials are predicting that 72 percent of the state's registered voters will cast ballots in the Nov. 6 election.

If it's borne out, the turnout predicted Tuesday by the secretary of state's office would be the highest in Missouri in quite some time.

More than 69 percent of Missouri voters cast ballots in the 2008 presidential election. The 2000 and 2004 elections both saw smaller turnouts than that.

A 72 percent turnout would equate to more than 3 million of Missouri's nearly 4.2 million registered voters casting ballots.

KBIA

Hello and welcome to Talking Politics, I’m Ryan Famuliner.

Less than a week, folks. That’s all the time you have to make sure you’re prepared for election day. KBIA’s been conducting in-depth interviews with political candidates for regional and statewide office in our studios, and we’re airing portions of those in these few days left leading up the election. We’re also posting the full length-interviews here on KBIA.org: we’re calling them “candidate conversations.”

Jessica Reese / KBIA

What if there was one political convention where all political parties were represented? Well, a group of people not even of voting age did just that in Columbia. Oakland Junior High 9th graders spent the last two months preparing for a mock political convention representing local, state, and national candidates.

Commentary: The Polls

Oct 30, 2012
so Sara says / Flickr

Here’s a political quiz:

Which of the following is more annoying?

  1. Non-stop attack ads on your TV
  2. Public opinion pollsters calling your phone
  3. Both of the above are equally annoying

C is the correct answer, unless a pollster calls during dinner, in which case the correct answer is b.  Or if it is a female calling, it would be a pollstress, I suppose.

SOS issues Missouri voter turnout predictions

Oct 30, 2012
Vote Here sign
File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri Secretary of State’s Office announced in a press release today that it predicts 72 percent of Missouri’s registered voters will vote in the November 6 general election.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

KBIA’s Kristofor Husted interviews Missouri state Rep. Shane Schoeller, who is challenging Democrat Jason Kander for the secretary of state office in the November 6 election.

john wright
KBIA

KBIA’s Jessica Reese recently interviewed Democratic candidate for State Representative in the 47th District, John Wright. He is challenging fellow newcomer to state politics, Republican nominee Mitch Richards, in the Nov. 6th election.

stopnlook / FLICKR

Holts Summit voters will decide on Nov. 6 whether to renew a 20-year-old sales tax. The .05 percent sales tax is earmarked for capital improvements and if renewed, would continue until 2033.

Holts Summit City Administrator Brian Crane said the city primarily used the original sales tax revenue to build a new sewage system. He said the renewal would expand upon necessary improvements to city infrastructure.

Boonville citizens to vote on sales tax

Oct 24, 2012
vote here sign
KBIA file photo

Boonville citizens will vote Nov. 6 on a tax initiative to raise the sales tax. The main portion of money from the tax would go to improving the water treatment plant in Boonville.

The tax initiative on the Boonville ballot  would raise the sales tax by half of one percent. This would raise the sales tax to 8.2 percent similar to that of surrounding cities.  The money would go toward improving the water treatment plant and storm water drainage issues. City Administrator Irl Tessendorf said times may be tough but the improvements are needed.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

This week on Talking Politics, Columbia College political scientist Terry Smith makes his predictions for November 6th. Plus, our “candidate conversation,” Democratic Lt. Governor candidate Susan Montee.

We hear again from Columbia College political scientist Terry Smith, who is a regular contributor to the show. In this commentary, he has his predictions for November 6th.

Commentary - 2012 election predictions

Oct 23, 2012
Marjie Kennedy / Flickr

I need to clarify a point I made in my last commentary.  When I said contributions to campaigns can be limited I was referring to federal campaigns --  President and Congress.  There are four states in which there are no limits on contributions to state campaigns – governor, state representative, etc. – and Missouri is one of the four.  Rex Sinquefield has given millions of dollars to candidates in both parties – because he can.

Jacob talks about the importance of higher education, and how he believes it can be a way to promote job growth in the state. He also stresses revitalization of Interstate 70, but doesn’t go as far as to promote turning it into a toll road. He says bonding will be the way to pay for that work, which he says will also create jobs. Jacob also questions the legitimacy of the his opponent, Republican Caleb Rowden, who he says is not qualified for the office. Jacob has served in the state house and senate.

Malwack / Wikimedia Commons

The 2012 presidential campaign has been unlike anything Missouri voters have seen in quite some time. Or perhaps "not seen" is a better description.

Neither Democratic President Barack Obama nor Republican challenger Mitt Romney has held any public campaign events in Missouri since winning his party's nomination. And neither has run TV ads specifically targeting Missouri.

That's a sharp contrast with the 2008 elections and the intense presidential campaigns that Missourians have come to expect over the past several decades.

zweifel
KBIA

KBIA’s Ryan Famuliner interviews Missouri Treasurer Clint Zweifel, a Democrat running for reelection this year.  He is being challenged by Republican Cole McNary in the November 6 election.

kander
KBIA

KBIA’s Kristofor Husted interviews Missouri state Rep. Jason Kander, who is challenging Republican Shane Schoeller for the secretary of state office in the November 6 election.

In the interview, Kander talks about how he would help build up small business in Missouri by making registration information and services more easily available and accessible. He also discusses his big difference from Schoeller when it comes to combating election fraud, namely campaign finance reform and ethics reform. Kander says his time in the Missouri House and in the Army conducting anti-corruption investigations gives him a strong foundation to fight election fraud. And – with what’s been a hot issue for the current secretary of state, Robin Carnahan – Kander addresses his ideas on the importance of clear ballot language. 

Check back every day as we continue to film interviews with Missouri candidates ahead of the 2012 election.

montee at kbia studios
KBIA

KBIA's Ryan Famuliner interviews former Missouri State Auditor Susan Montee, who is challenging incumbent Republican Lt. Governor Peter Kinder in the November 6th election.

Jay Buffington / Wikimedia Commons

A November ballot measure to significantly raise Missouri's tobacco tax to increase public education spending is drawing financial support from leaders of the state's flagship university.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that the campaign donors in favor of the Proposition B ballot measure include university curator Warren Erdman, who contributed $5,000. His company, Kansas City Southern Railway Co., gave $25,000.

Other contributors include university system President Tim Wolfe, with a $1,000 donation; and chancellors from three of the system's four campuses.

Kelsey Kerwin / KBIA

More than a hundred MU students gathered on campus for last night’s presidential debate between President Barack Obama and Presidential candidate and former Governor Mitt Romney.

Several MU student groups, including Tigers Against Partisan Politics, the Missouri Students Association and Associated Students at the University of Missouri, hosted the event to encourage more students to learn about politics. The groups are sponsoring the nonpartisan watch parties at each Presidential debate.

Boone County Libertarians prepare for Nov. 6

Oct 16, 2012
Andrew Yost / KBIA file photo

There are almost 30 Libertarian candidates running for various offices in Missouri this year, more than all but four other states in the country.

KBIA’s Erin Dismeier spoke to some Libertarians and their candidates in Missouri to hear their thoughts on this year’s election.

Frank James
NPR

Tonight is the second of the scheduled presidential debates and KBIA's watching along with you. Listen to the debate on KBIA channel 2 with your HD radio, stream it on HD-2 online, or follow along with the live chat below while you view it on TV.

NPR's veteran political blogger Frank James hosts a live chat with listeners and watchers starting at 7:30PM central time.

McCaskill serving food
Paige Travis, Elisa Lopez / KBIA

Election Day is less than a month away and both national and local candidates are pushing their campaigns before the final date to vote. KBIA’s caught up with Senator Clare McCaskill at Flat Branch Pub and Brewing in Columbia today as she shed some insight on her political views of the middle-class. 

Kyle Stokes / KBIA

In another face-off between the presidential candidates, the format for tomorrow’s debate might create a different tone in the discussion.

An expert at MU said the second Presidential Debate could be a challenge for both candidates. President Barack Obama was criticized by some for not being aggressive in the last debate and said he would perform better in the next debate.

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