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Commentary: The Art of the Acceptance Speech

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I am not a convention junkie.  Mostly I read the day after about what went on.  But I do watch two events live: the presidential nominee acceptance speeches.

At the conclusion of each speech I turn off the TV and write down my impressions.  I am not interested in what the talking heads have to say.  Sometimes the next morning when I catch the analyses I wonder aloud: “Did those people watch the same speech I did?”

Today Paul Pepper visits with KELLY SMITH about River City Habitat for Humanity's 100th home, now under construction in Jefferson City. For an organization that's only 25 years old, Kelly says that "...to be getting to our 100th home at this point is a big accomplishment." Find out what their plans are for the next 100! At [4:27] father and son acting duo CHRIS and NATHAN HEESE invite everyone to come see them and the rest of the cast in Maplewood Barn Theatre's production of "Oliver!," opening this Thursday in Columbia! July 26, 2016

Alex Hanson / Flickr

Some Missouri delegates to the Democratic National Convention who supported the presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders are reluctant to heed his call to now back the likely Democratic nominee, Hillary Clinton. 

Joe Gratz / Flickr

A federal judge has chosen a monitor team to oversee reforms of Ferguson's policing and court system.

U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry announced Monday that Squire Patton Boggs, a law firm based in Cleveland, was picked from four finalists to make sure reforms are adequate in the St. Louis suburb. 

Doug Kerr / Flickr

  A federal judge has chosen a monitor team to oversee reforms of Ferguson's policing and court system.

U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry on Monday announced that Squire Patton Boggs, a law firm based in Cleveland, was picked from four finalists to make sure reforms are adequate in the St. Louis suburb. Ferguson officials said the cost of the monitoring will not exceed $1.25 million over five years, or $350,000 for any single year.

Brunner campaign

  Missouri Republican candidate John Brunner said he wants to be the first businessman elected governor in 80 years.

The former chairman and CEO of personal care product company Vi-Jon Inc. told The Associated Press his business experience qualifies him to run the state.

If elected, Brunner said he'll support right to work and recruit businesses to come to the state.

Brunner has never held elected office before. He lost to U.S. Rep. Todd Akin in a three-way GOP primary for U.S. Senate.

The Missouri House speaker said state representative Bill Lant has been hospitalized after a serious car accident.

In a Monday email to lawmakers and staff obtained by The Associated Press, House Speaker Todd Richardson said Lant was taken to an intensive care unit after an accident that morning.

Richardson said “there is reason to be optimistic at this time." He said Lant's family is waiting for more information on his condition.

Lant's office referred comment to the House chief clerk, who did not immediately return an AP request for comment Monday.

Today Paul Pepper visits with CONNIE SHAY about the 10th annual Peacemakers Quilt Show, happening in conjunction with the Fayette Festival of the Arts next Saturday on the campus of Central Methodist University! This year's theme is "In the Garden," and Connie brought an example of what you'll find among a hundred other quilts - watch! At [2:56] JOYCE HULETT and MARY RIDGE tell us about all of the programs sponsored by the Retired Teachers Association of Boone County, and it's a lot! Programs like classroom grants, volunteer work and something called "Books for Soldiers" are just a few of the activities their 450 members are involved with. July 25, 2016

File / KBIA

Republican candidates in Missouri's gubernatorial primary are pledging an aggressive law-and-order approach, two years after the fatal Ferguson police shooting of Michael Brown prompted widespread protests.

Today Paul Pepper and DR. DAVID NEWMAN, RoseHeart Hypnotherapy Success Centers, Inc., talk about procrastination. We're all guilty of it, but why? Dr. Newman says it's a control issue. Since we can't control everything in our life, that which we can, we avoid. Sound familiar? If that's you or someone you know, check out this informative interview! July 22, 2016

Ray Tsang / Flickr

Meteorologists and atmospheric researchers say the Midwest's first dangerous bout of heat and humidity this summer is partly to blame on moisture piped out of the ground and into the atmosphere by the increasing acreage of corn crops reaching their peak.

James Reid Lambdin / The White House Historical Association

Political conventions in American have been around as long as there has been an America. Back in 1840, members of Missouri's Whig Party made their way by land and by water to Rocheport for their state convention. The Friends of Historic Rocheport's president Sherry Moreau was Trevor Harris' guest on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

Also on this program Chris Campbell from the Boone County Historical Society discussed Boone County Votes, a show opening next month at the society's Columbia museum.


Five Arrests Made in Relation to Columbia Robberies

Jul 21, 2016
Jason Rojas / Flickr

 The Columbia Police Department arrested five suspects in relation to a series of armed robberies that occurred last week.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

A Missouri state senator who's a former sheriff is condemning violence against police and says targeting law enforcement officers is a crime of hate.

Sully Fox / KBIA file photo

Missouri has had only two Republican secretaries of state since World War II, and both had the last name of Blunt.

AP

For many Americans, the Islamic State was first burned in our minds as a threat back in August 2014.

That’s when the terror group released chilling video of American journalist James Foley being beheaded by a black clad man who condemns U.S. airstrikes in Iraq. Foley of course was much more than a victim of terror or a martyr for press freedom.

He was also a son, a brother, a colleague, and a friend.

On this edition of Global Journalist we’re going to talk more about the life of James Foley. We’ll also look at what his death tell us not only about him but about how news organizations operate and how the U.S. government handles hostage situations. 


Today Paul Pepper visits with JOAN STACK, Curator of Art Collections at The State Historical Society of Missouri, about a new acquisition from local artist Brian Mahieu. Brian's painting, titled "Winter Sunset Looking North, Cottonwood Grove," captures a Missouri winter at it's bleakest; but as Joan says, "there's still a sense of the beauty of nature...those cycles of life." See it for yourself in the gallery now through September! July 21, 2016

Ray Tsang / Flickr

High temperatures and humidity will bake much of the central U.S. this week, sending heat indexes soaring as high as 115 degrees in some places for the first time this year.

Brunner campaign

Wealthy Missouri businessman John Brunner has poured another $1 million into his campaign for governor.

File

An Islamic relief agency once based in Missouri has admitted in federal court that it illegally funneled $1.4 million to Iraq.

Travis Isaacs / Flickr

The former Chrysler plant in the St. Louis suburb of Fenton could be getting new life.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media and KBIA

The town of Brookfield, Missouri, in the north-central part of the state is a close-knit community. Population: about 4,500. Becky Cleveland, who grew up in town, says the area looks a little different today.

“When I was a kid, like I said, there was four grocery stores,” she says. Today there is just one and a nearby Wal-Mart.

Walking down Main Street past a few vacant storefronts among the businesses, it’s plain to see the town isn’t in its prime any more. Brookfield, though, is more vibrant than many other rural towns, Cleveland says. Rural life used to be centered around the farm, but farms today don’t work like they used to, which has caused a drop in jobs and left some small towns struggling for survival.

Eric Peters / U.S. Department of Agriculture

There's been a national spike in the number of deaths from opioid drug overdoses over the past 15 years and some of the biggest increases have come in the Midwest. Missouri is no exception and also holds the distinction of being the only state without a prescription drug monitoring database—a common tool for preventing abuse.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack head's the nation's initiative on rural opioid addiction. On Friday, Vilsack and U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill will host a town hall meeting in Columbia to discuss the epidemic with media and invited guests. 

KBIA spoke with Secretary Vilsack earlier this week. 

Wikimedia Commons

Comedian. Host. Fake Republican from Ohio. In his show business career, Paul Gilmartin has had many different titles. Born and raised in Illinois, Paul started his stand-up career in Chicago. In 1995 Paul was tapped to host Dinner and a Movie on TBS. To Paul's surprise, the show ran for a whopping 16 years. Near the end of the show's run, Paul started hosting a self-help podcast called The Mental Illness Happy Hour. Paul interviews a variety of guests whose lives have been affected by mental illness, depression or trauma. It is one of the most popular self-help podcasts on iTunes. Paul is also the creator of Richard Martin, a deeply conservative representative from Ohio's 19th District. Paul has played Rep. Martin on podcasts, interviews, and at the Aspen Comedy Festival. For more information about Rep. Richard Martin, visit askarepublican.com. The Mental Illness Happy Hour is on iTunes, or at mentalpod.com.


KBIA file photo

Columbia Police Chief Ken Burton says he would consider a buyout from the city to leave his job, according to a letter his attorney sent to Mayor Brian Treece.

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