News

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including:

·      University of Missouri Revokes Cosby's Honorary Degree

·      MU to Rent Out Vacant Residence Halls, Tackle Declining Enrollment


Mizzou Columns
David Chicopham / Flickr

The University of Missouri's Board of Curators has voted unanimously to revoke an honorary degree it granted to Bill Cosby.

University system President Mun Choi recommended that the board strip the comedian of a doctorate in humane letters he received in 1999. Choi cited allegations from several women that Cosby sexually assaulted them. Choi says Cosby's actions do not reflect the university's values.

Associated Press

On the surface, the tiny Persian Gulf nation of Qatar has much in common with Saudi Arabia and the other monarchies of the Arabian peninsula. Hydro-carbons have made it enormously wealthy, and it’s conservative Muslim nation ruled by a hereditary monarchy.

That’s made the decision by Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt to launch a surprise economic and diplomatic blockade against Qatar this month all the more surprising.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the diplomatic conflict between Qatar and its neighbors over funding of militant Islamic groups, the Al-Jazeera news network and relations with Iran.


Today Paul Pepper welcomes back ANGELA SPECK, Professor of Astronomy at the University of Missouri. Angela takes us on tour of www.greatamericaneclipse.com - a great way to find out just how long you'll get to enjoy the path of totality during this summer's solar eclipse! June 23, 2017

File photo / KBIA

Missouri Republican Gov. Eric Greitens says he prefers a ramped-up House version of a bill to tighten state abortion laws

Greitens told reporters Thursday in Jefferson City that he supports the latest House iteration, which has more stringent restrictions than what senators had initially approved.

David Shane / Flickr

A Missouri circuit judge says Republican Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft's office wrote a confusing and grammatically incorrect summary of a referendum to repeal right to work.

A summary is meant to help voters understand ballot measures. But Cole County Circuit Court Judge Daniel Green on Thursday ruled the right-to-work summary could confuse voters.

MU to Rent Out Vacant Residence Halls, Tackle Declining Enrollment

Jun 22, 2017
KBIA

One way MU can make some money as it struggles with declining enrollment and lagging state support is to rent out empty residence halls to football fans, eclipse watchers and others who come to town to visit.

Sarah Nordin

Opera singers Jonathan Ray and Sarah Nordin are in Columbia for this summer's Hot Summer Nights Music Festival. They were guests on this week's Thinking Out Loud in advance of Sunday's Mostly Mozart concert, their final performance in the series. 

Andrew Quint, a middle aged white man, wears a blue and white striped shirt and stands over the left shoulder of Beth Rahn, a middle aged white woman with red hair and a blue shirt covered in hearts.
Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

Dr. Andrew Quint has been the Medical Director at Family Health Center in Columbia for many years. For the past 11 years, he has worked with nurse Beth Rahn. They spoke about the many patients they have seen over the years and how those patients have changed their lives.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org.  

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back JANE WHITESIDES from the Missouri Symphony Society. This Sunday's "Mostly Mozart" concert at First Baptist Church in Columbia features, among others, resident opera artist SAMUEL WRIGHT and accompanist MUN-TZUNG WONG. They join us in studio to perform a sneak preview at [2:48]. Enjoy! June 22, 2017

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

A lawmaker says Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens will sign his bill to ban people convicted of sex offenses against children from coming within 500 feet of children's museums.

Cassville Republican Sen. David Sater said Wednesday that he's meeting with Greitens for a bill signing in Jefferson City Thursday.

Mizzou Columns
David Chicopham / Flickr

University of Missouri System President Mun Choi wants the university to rescind an honorary degree given to Bill Cosby nearly 20 years ago.

The system's Board of Curators will vote Friday on Choi's recommendation. A university staff memo sent to the curators says sexual assault allegations against Cosby are "incompatible" with the honorary doctorate in humane letters given to him in 1999.

Doug Kerr / Flickr

A federal judge in St. Louis is set to hear an update on the progress Ferguson, Missouri, has made in its agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice.

The St. Louis suburb has been under scrutiny since the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014. Brown, who was black and unarmed, was fatally shot by white Ferguson officer Darren Wilson during a street confrontation, leading to months of unrest.

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom, including: 


Jason Rojas / Flickr

Aspiring Missouri college police officers will face the same training as other future cops under a bill signed by the governor.

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens on Tuesday signed the legislation. Current law calls for at least 320 hours of training for college police compared to at least 470 hours for most other aspiring officers.

The bill also will give community college police officers the ability to enforce traffic rules, such as speed limits, on campus. Only university police now have that authority.

The legislation takes effect Aug. 28.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri Democratic Auditor Nicole Galloway says the state could face a $3 billion loss from tax credits over the next 15 years.

A new report released Wednesday by Galloway's office says that's how much lawmakers have authorized for tax credits that have not yet been redeemed.

The auditor's office says the state has faced $5.4 billion in revenue losses from tax credits over the past decade.

Galloway says policymakers should consider the impact tax credits have on the budget.

Sara Shahriari

UM System President Mun Choi announced today that the UM System is focused on saving students money on course materials.

According to Choi, the University will develop a system-wide strategy to encourage use of quality open educational resources – which are free to students. The university will also focus on Auto Access, a program that makes books available online at a lower cost than traditional textbooks.

"Our goal is to move into the future by introducing more open source material so our students can have an outstanding, affordable education," Choi said.

Megyn Kelly’s profile of Infowars’ founder Alex Jones has run – in most U.S. cites. Did it live up to the hype? Also, rumors Sean Spicer is searching for his replacement, Fox News drops its iconic “Fair & Balanced” slogan, and coverage of the Cosby mistrial. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Photo courtesy of Zoe Moffett, Colorado College.

See a bee; hear a buzz.

That’s what researchers studying the declining bee population are banking on. A new technique based on recording buzzing bees hopes to show farmers just how much pollinating the native bee population is doing in their fields. 

Vegetable and fruit growers depend on pollinators to do a lot of work in their greenhouses and fields. Pollinators, like bees, flutter about the blossoms on plants and orchard trees, transferring pollen from plant to plant and ensuring that those organisms have a chance at reproducing.

Farm Your Yard: When a Weed is Not a Weed

Jun 21, 2017
Carrie Hargrove / Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture

Daily life is comprised of a series of tasks that depending upon your natural outlook on life, could be considered tedious, or rewarding. For example, say you love to bake, and making a cheesecake for your loved ones is your definition of a good time.

Missouri Department of Conservation

From tiny ants to bats, birds, bees, and butterflies, we depend on pollinators to produce our food, and protect biodiversity. This week on Discover Nature, we celebrate national pollinator week.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back SEAN SPENCE, Regional Director of the Better Business Bureau of Mid-Missouri. Sean tells us about these scams to watch out for: "relieving students of debt"; "drive-by pavers"; and "door-to-door pest control." Sean says the best way to not fall for these 'special' offers is to, "do your due diligence." June 21, 2017

Courtesy NBC

Megyn Kelly’s profile of Infowars’ founder Alex Jones has run – in most U.S. cites. Did it live up to the hype? 

Jack Shafer, POLITICO: “Megyn Kelly pantses Alex Jones

Commentary: Wendy Noren Did Her Job the Right Way

Jun 20, 2017

In the last six months Boone County has seen two exemplary public servants step down.  In January Karen Miller left the Southern District County Commission seat she had held for 24 years.  Last week Wendy Noren resigned from her position as Boone County Clerk after 35 years.

KBIA has won the National Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Innovation among small market radio stations in the country. The Radio Television Digital News Association announced the national award winners Tuesday morning.

Today Paul Pepper visits with JENNY FLATT, Director, MU Family Impact Center, about Hot Salsa Night 2017. This annual fundraiser features a live auction, a silent auction and, of course, salsa! Watch for details. At [3:46] TODD DAVISON takes us inside the 2017 season at Maples Repertory Theatre in Macon! On stage now is "Million Dollar Quartet," the true story of one night in Memphis when four musical legends - before they were legends - came together at Sun Records and started jamming. And that's just the beginning of what's sure to be a crowd-pleasing summer of professional theatre! June 20, 2017

File / flickr

State versus state battle lines are being drawn across the Mississippi River, with a top Missouri official urging Illinois regulators to back away from a plan that would allow higher levees, potentially worsening flooding on the Missouri side of the river.

Bird's Point in New Madrid
File Photo / KBIA

Another small earthquake has rattled parts of southeast Missouri along the New Madrid fault.

The U.S. Geological Survey's Earthquakes Hazards Program says the earthquake with a magnitude of 2.7 rumbled at 4:26 a.m. Monday, centered near the small town of Steele in the Missouri Bootheel region. There were no immediate reports of injury or damage.

The New Madrid fault produced earthquakes in 1811 and 1812 that could be felt as far away as New England. Some experts believe it's just a matter of time before another serious quake along the fault line.

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