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  Since his arrival at the University of Missouri last February, Chancellor Bowen Loftin has inspired several changes. He recently announced a voluntary separation program that could serve as an incentive for retirement for tenured faculty members. KBIA’s Ashley Reese talked with several MU professors about why this program might encourage some of the university’s best professors to leave.

Around 1950, cities in the U.S began adding fluoride to the water supply as a way to reduce tooth decay. And ever since, water fluoridation has been a debated issue. Despite evidence that fluoride treatment is beneficial to oral health, the town of Waynesville, Mo. recently voted to stop adding fluoride to its water system. 

But ending water fluoridation in Waynesville didn’t involve activists, budget cuts or a heated debate.

App in Missouri helps hunters feel nostalgic

59 minutes ago
dishfunctional / Flickr

You may need a camo case for your smart phone now. Last week, the Missouri Department of Conservation released a hunting app. It lets hunters report their yield right from their phone. 

Amylovesyah / Flickr

 

Maureen: so tell me a little bit about your research 

Kumar: we do different types of work in the laboratory one of our um main focus is on 

  Today Paul Pepper visits with HEATHER CARVER about the MU Department of Theatre's fall season! Performances in October and November. At [4:51] LAURIE KNAUF, Central Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells us about the different types of milk! What's your favorite? October 2, 2014

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Hearings have begun to review the 2011 merger between the Missouri State Highway and Water Patrol.
  • A new cell tower has sparked debate in Harrisburg.
  • Ameren Missouri has filed a long term energy plan to the Missouri Public Service Commission.

Skepticism surrounds new Clean Water Act proposal

2 hours ago

The Environmental Protection Agency and the United States Army Corps of Engineers released a draft proposal aimed to strengthen the protection for clean water. The draft proposal released back in March states the goal of the proposed rule is to clarify the Clean Water Act of 1972 and benefit agriculture.

However, many farmers and groups are skeptical about the proposed rule. The rule would expand federal authority over “waters of the United States.”

  Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards. How do you keep the trolls from invading your news site’s smart, open dialogue? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: a special edition of Views of the News.


Startup weekend in Columbia starts on Friday, kicking off a fifty-four-hour boot camp at the Museao Building in south Columbia. People will work in teams to pitch and develop their business ideas with the help of mentors during the boot camp. At the end of the weekend, they'll present their business plans to a panel of judges, who will them select the winners. Missouri Business Alert’s Elizabeth Tharakan explores how Columbia’s Startup Weekend has recently become a springboard for health care IT companies.

Sales tax. Not a great opening line for journalists trying to educate people about how a city functions. The moment sales tax is mentioned eyes glaze over, something else suddenly becomes important, and we all casually scroll through twitter on our phones.

But sales tax is actually a really fascinating topic, especially right now in our city and country’s history. To learn why, we have to go back…way back, to 1970.

This is the third story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada

Dr. Kristi Crymes is a family medicine doctor at the Nevada Medical Clinic. Crymes came up from Springfield three years ago to work in Vernon County, which has some of the state’s poorest health rankings. In 2010 the obesity rate in Vernon County was 30 percent. The incidence of adult diabetes has hung around 11 percent for the past 3 years. 

MU faculty and students create first university mace

22 hours ago

The story of the University of Missouri’s new mace dovetails with the inauguration of Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin. After all, before Loftin came to Columbia, university administrators didn’t even know what a ceremonial mace was, let alone have one. John Murray, Senior Director of Auxiliary and Service Operations at MU, said a simple question from Loftin is how the ball got rolling on the mace project.

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Sen. Claire McCaskill to discuss ways to address sexual violence at Missouri colleges and universities.
  • Moberly Area Community College received a grant to fund STEM education.
  • State representatives to review the merger between the state highway and water patrols.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill is planning to travel to Missouri colleges and universities to discuss ways of addressing sexual violence on campuses.

  Today Paul Pepper chats with ADAM SAUNDERS about this Saturday's Harvest Hootenanny fundraiser at Urban Farm in Columbia! Don't miss the meal as prepared by Brook Harlan and the Columbia Career Center. At [4:11] TIM REINBOTT returns with a pink pumpkin (aka: porcelain doll) in hand to plug the Bradford Farm Breast Cancer Awareness fundraiser! October 1, 2014 (Pardon the audio! It's good information and worth listening to at least once.)

Moberly Area Community College received a federal grant of $336,000 on Monday to support education in the fields of science, technology engineering and math, otherwise known as STEM.

via Twitter

Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards.

The psychology of web trolling

PM Newscast for September 30, 2014

Sep 30, 2014

Biomedical research teams receive grants

Sep 30, 2014
KBIA

The University of Missouri awarded $600,000 to biomedical research teams at the Reynolds Alumni Center on Tuesday. The grants are part of the University’s Coulter Translational Partnership Program, which supports innovations by faculty in the MU School of Medicine and College of Engineering.

Mr. Shiv / Flickr

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Boone County officials and some vendors say they are concerned the closing of the Central Missouri Events Center could hurt the region's economy.

The center, formerly known as the Boone County Fairground, will hold only a few events before closing shortly after Thanksgiving. The decision came after county voters in August soundly defeated a proposed eight-cent sales tax to support the center, other county parks and economic development.

This is the second story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada

The town of Nevada, in southwest Missouri, is changing in very subtle ways. To see it you really need to know where to look. For example, Walton Park, on Atlantic Street, used to be one of the town’s less popular parks for kids – just a small slide, a merry-go-round, and two swings. But today Walton Park is where all the cool six-year-olds go, thanks to one new piece of playground equipment.  

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Sen. Roy Blunt toured the state yesterday asking law enforcement officials how the federal government can best help in major emergency situations.
  • City of Columbia employees received a two percent pay raise yesterday.
  • MU has been awarded two federal grants to implement programs on family farms.

  Today Paul Pepper and KELLY SMITH talk about River City Habitat for Humanity's 90th house in Jefferson City! Would you like to help? Visit their Re-Store! At [4:55] VALERIE CHAFFIN tells us about 30 years of Second Chance and this weekend's 'Paws in the Park' fundraiser, now two days! September 30, 2014

On a warm humid Mid-Missouri afternoon, a celebration 175 years in the making was held in City Hall Plaza in direct sunlight. As you looked down eight street from the plaza you could see the top of Jesse Hall. It was a picture perfect setting to celebrate the 175th anniversary of the partnership between the University of Missouri, Columbia and Boone County.

“It’s a very symbiotic relationship,” said Columbia Mayor Bob McDavid. “I think it’s a relationship that can’t help but grow and get stronger in the future.”

Local pond rated a high potential hazard by the EPA

Sep 30, 2014

Citizens of Columbia need to be extra cautious near a local pond the next time it rains heavily.

The University of Missouri has been awarded two federal grants worth more than $830,000 to implement programs on family farms.

roy blunt
TalkMediaNews / Flickr

  US Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Missouri, met with local law enforcement in Jefferson City on Monday to discuss when police use military surplus equipment.

The meeting, which was closed to the media, comes almost two months after police responded to protests following the death of Michael Brown with tear gas, armored vehicles and other military equipment acquired through Department of Defense and Homeland Security programs.

Blunt said law enforcement officials he has talked to only use the equipment for defensive purposes and that programs like these are beneficial.

school buses
Twix / Flickr

  Career changers and those looking to strengthen job security sometimes turn to the American Board for online teacher certification. Elementary education was just added to Missouri’s list of approved online certification programs with the American Board in August.

“It actually didn’t take us very long,” Miranda Amir senior director of operations at The American Board said. “We just requested to ad EE this year and it only went through one legislative session so it was quite fast in comparison to how long it usually takes to get a subject.”

Scott Davidson / Flickr

  Eight more people have been arrested following another night of protests in Ferguson.

No violence was reported from the Sunday night protest that was at times boisterous in the St. Louis suburb where unrest has been common in the month-and-a-half since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a Ferguson police officer.

Protesters banged drums, pots and pans. Police said they would enforce a noise ordinance at 11 p.m., and police made a few arrests involving those who continued to make noise.

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