News

Ag Leaders Hope To Avoid Budget Cuts In New Farm Bill

5 hours ago
Bryan Thompson for Harvest Public Media

 

At a stressful time for U.S. farmers, the government’s efforts at calming the agricultural waters took center stage Thursday, when the heads of the U.S. Senate’s Agriculture Committee left Washington for the Midwest to solicit opinions on priorities for the next Farm Bill.

U.S. Sens. Pat Roberts, R-KS, and Debbie Stabenow, D-MI, heard from Midwest farmers at their first field hearing on the 2018 Farm Bill at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas.

AP Photo

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe recently turned 93, making him the oldest non-royal head of state in the world.

But in his 37 years in power, he's become a caricature of the corrupt African dictator. Once one of the continent's wealthiest countries, Zimbabwe's economy has halved since 2000. He's sent armed militias to beat and kill political opponents and in 2015 threw a $1 million birthday party for himself, feeding his 20,000 guests dishes like baby elephant even as many of his countrymen live in extreme poverty.

But as Mugabe pushes deeper into his nineties, there are growing questions about his hold on power. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the twilight of the Robert Mugabe era in Zimbabwe and what may come after him.


Today Paul Pepper and DR. DAVID NEWMAN, RoseHeart Hypnotherapy Success Centers, Inc., talk about phobias and how to treat them. Everyone is scared of something, so what gives you "instant flight reaction"? (Arachnophobia is the number one answer.) Dr. Newman tells us that treatment is best left to the professionals, saying: "what we can do in a matter of a few sessions (to get you over it), could take you a few years." February 24, 2017

File Photo / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY (AP) -- Missouri House members have passed a bill to reduce the duration of state jobless benefits to one of the shortest periods nationally.

House members voted 100-56 Thursday to send the measure to the Senate.

The bill is a revival of a failed 2015 plan to cut the maximum benefits to 13 weeks if the state's jobless rate is below 6 percent. That's seven weeks fewer than what's now allowed.

Missouri's unemployment rate in December was 4.4 percent.

Potential Fuel Tax Increase Sparks Controversy

5 hours ago
Andrew Pilewski / KBIA

Missourians could pay more at the gas pump to offset income tax cuts, according to a bill proposed in the Missouri House.

The House read a bill Thursday that would cut income taxes for the top tax bracket in Missouri while raising fuel taxes to offset the cuts. These funds would then be used to finance infrastructure improvements in the state.

Bill sponsor Bart Korman (R) thinks that this bill is a solution to funding road work in Missouri.

ambulance
Creative Commons / Flickr

COLUMBIA -- A new program aiding emergency response is coming to Columbia, according to an announcement from the Columbia Fire Department, MU Healthcare and Boone Hospital.

The File of Life program aims at helping emergency responders when patients are unable to communicate with them. Residents list their medical information on a form, place it in a fireproof file and put it on their fridge. The form includes prescriptions, allergies, medical history and emergency contacts.

Legislators Split On Missouri ID Requirement Bill

21 hours ago
File / KBIA

A bill to make Missouri driver’s licenses compliant with the federal REAL ID Act is moving forward despite strong opposition. The bill has been sent to the House Fiscal Review Committee, where it’s scheduled to be heard February 23.  

Eric Greitens
Dave Ingraham / Flickr

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is largely reversing his proposed cut to in-home care services for low-income disabled residents.

Greitiens said Thursday he wants to use a $52 million settlement payment with tobacco companies to undo $41 million of a proposed $52 million reduction in Medicaid funding for in-home care services next fiscal year.

missouri capitol
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Missouri's GOP legislative leaders say it should be up to schools to decide how to handle transgender student bathroom access.

Comments from Republicans Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard and House Speaker Todd Richardson to reporters Thursday came days after a Senate committee hearing on a bill to restrict restroom access in public K-12 schools.

Erin McKinstry / KBIA

The diversity of this year’s Academy Award nominations has not gone unnoticed. In stark contrast to last year, when several prominent people of color boycotted the ceremony because of a lack of diversity, the 2017 picks feature a black nominee in each of the four acting categories and a more diverse set of nominations, from best picture to best documentary.

Brian Maurer, local filmmaker and film studies professor at MU, said the increase in diversity is most likely a reaction to last year’s outcry.

Keith Fulton and Lou Pepe discuss the balancing act of following multiple characters in their film The Bad Kids (T/F ’16). The Bad Kids premiers on PBS in March 2017. 

 

University of Missouri Health Care

University of Missouri Health Care will offer advice on how to minimize the risk of fall injuries at a health fair at Columbia Mall on Saturday.

Nurses and an on-site occupational and physical therapist will recommend how people can improve their strength, balance and overall health.

Clinician nurse Kassie Campbell said the trauma caused by fall injuries is a significant threat to the elderly.

Today Paul Pepper visits with RACHEL LITTRELL, MD, MU Health Care, about cardio-oncology. Rachel tells us that as we grow older, cancer and heart disease become more and more common. She says people will survive a heart attack only to learn of a cancer diagnosis; if that's the case, regular treatment may not apply and special considerations will have to be made. Stay healthy, everyone! At [3:56] JILL WOMACK, TRYPS Founder and Executive Artistic Director, and student NATALIE BOTKINS, invite "mommies and me" (or "fathers and daughters") to a 'Princess Tea Party' fundraiser April 23rd at the Kimball Ballroom on the Stephens College campus. Watch for details! February 23, 2017

David Shane / Flickr

Missouri's unemployed would again face losing several weeks of jobless benefits under a bill advancing in the state House.

House members in a Wednesday voice vote gave the measure initial approval.

Rep. Scott Fitzpatrick's bill is a revival of a failed 2015 plan to cut the maximum benefits to 13 weeks if the state's jobless rate is below 6 percent. That's seven weeks fewer than what's now allowed.

Missouri's unemployment rate in December was 4.4 percent. More current data are not available.

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

Vice President Mike Pence is visiting a suburban St. Louis Jewish cemetery where more than 150 headstones were damaged earlier in the week. He says there is "no place in America for hatred or acts of prejudice or violence or anti-Semitism."

Pence says at the cemetery in University City that the people of Missouri are inspiring the nation with their "love and care for this place." He is thanking them for "showing the world what America's really all about."

Pence was joined by Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

File / KBIA

The Missouri Senate has given initial approval for legislation establishing a prescription drug monitoring program.

Senators on Wednesday voted 20-13 to create a database that tracks when prescriptions for controlled substances are written and filed. The goal of such programs is to prevent people from going to multiple doctors to get prescriptions for drugs such as painkillers — sometimes known as "doctor shopping."

Missouri is the only state that doesn't have such a system.

Katy Mersmann / Columbia Faith & Values

Rabbi Yossi Feintuch of Congregation Beth Shalom in Columbia said he received several phone calls from concerned synagogue members after hearing that a Jewish cemetery in a St. Louis suburb was vandalized over the weekend. They were worried that the Jewish section of the Columbia cemetery would also be attacked, Feintuch said.

 

A member of the congregation board contacted the Columbia cemetery and found out that nothing was out of the ordinary in the Jewish section, Feintuch said.

 

File Photo / KBIA

Parents of transgender children are slamming a Missouri measure that would require public school students to use bathrooms and locker rooms that correspond with the sex on their birth certificates.

Republican Sen. Ed Emery said that the measure is needed to protect students' safety and privacy.

Parents and transgender children argued at a hearing yesterday that the proposal is discriminatory and would put transgender students at risk.

Gage Skidmore / flickr

Vice President Mike Pence talked about job growth while visiting an equipment and engine dealership in Missouri today.

Missouri Govenor Eric Greitens joined Pence on at the Fabick Cat headquarters in Fenton, Missouri, outside of St. Louis at 1:30 p.m. Pence met with workers, received a tour of the facility, and gave a speech.

The vice president's remarks aligned with a push for labor reforms in the Republican-led Missouri legislature. Bills include proposed changes to the way minimum-wage requirements are calculated for public works projects.

Does the use of anonymous sources and leaked material by journalists make them the enemy? We haven’t heard words like that from a president since the days of Richard Nixon. Also, why Simon & Schuster and CPAC are backing away from Breitbart Senior Editor Milo Yiannopoulos, how BuzzFeed plans to break you out of your news bubble and more. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Lindsey Rentals / Lindsey Rentals

Sherman Brown had a large impact on the Columbia community when he was alive, and will continue to have a presence in his city even after his passing.

State representative Kip Kendrick filed a bill to rename the stretch of Providence road between Business Loop 70 and Interstate 70 “Sherman Brown Jr. Memorial Highway.”

Sherman Brown was the owner of Lindsey Rentals, an equipment and party rental store in Columbia, when he died in August.

Brown had worked for Lindsey Rentals for almost 50 years, and used his store to mentor the city’s youth by hiring at risk teens.

lake of the ozarks
bsabarnowl / flickr

The Lake of the Ozarks Police Department has purchased twelve body cameras for use beginning later this month.

The cameras will be mandatory for use by all uniformed officers, according to Police Chief Gary Launderville. The department chose body cameras over the traditional in-car camera as the former allows for increased mobility.

“We can go inside a business, we can go inside a house, down the hill, around the corner. We still get video where we don’t have that with an in-car camera,” said Launderville.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

Liz Graznak runs an organic farm near Jamestown, Missouri, which she calls Happy Hollow Farm. She sells her vegetables to local restaurants, in CSA boxes and at the farmer’s market.  But eight years ago, after falling in love with the idea of growing her own local produce, the farm she runs today looked like a near-impossible dream.

While on track to earn a PhD in plant breeding, Graznak bought her first box of produce from a nearby farmer. Soon after, she decided then that instead of studying plants, she wanted to grow them. Easier said than done, though.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

KBIA

More than 200 people gathered to voice their concerns about health care at a town hall on Tuesday night hosted by CoMo for Progress.

The town hall was held so the public could share stories and concerns about the potential repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Since Congress is in recess, Senators Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt were invited to attend the event, as well Representative Vicki Hartzler. McCaskill did not attend, but representatives from her Columbia office read a letter from the senator and listened to attendees concerns.

New Grant Promotes Undergraduate STEM Education

Feb 22, 2017
University of Liverpool Faculty of Health & Life Sciences/Flickr

 The American Association of Universities (AAU) awarded a small grant to an interdisciplinary faculty team at the University of Missouri to develop undergraduate STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

The grant proposal was written by Johannes Schul and Sarah Bush, both from the Division of Biological Sciences. They are a part of a team of nine faculty from eight different departments.

The $20,000 grant over the next two years will help the team redesign STEM curriculum and train faculty.

Today Paul Pepper visits with SEAN SPENCE, Regional Director of the Mid-Missouri Better Business Bureau, about a tax prep scam where the CPA was convincing his clients to write the check to him for the money they owed to the IRS. He's in prison, but they still have to pay. Hear the full story and how you can protect yourself from the same situation! February 22, 2017

Pages