News

  It seems every few weeks we’re talking about another shooting incident. Why is that? MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough puts the blame on the 24-hour cable news networks. Is it a fair criticism? Also, President Obama’s appearance on an NBC reality show, press freedoms challenged at student publications across the country, and athletic teams’ game changing decision regarding access for credentialed journalists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Emerald O'Brien / KBIA

As mobile health technologies like Fitbits and Apple Health become more common, better health seems inevitable. But much of the data that users can now track never actually reaches their doctors.

That’s one of the problems University of Missouri psychiatrist Dr. Ganesh Gopalakrishna faced while treating his patients with various mental illnesses. While some of his patients were logging their activity, both mental and physical, he couldn’t get a good record of it.


Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Jeff Siegfried knows just about anything you’d ever want to find out about a 50-acre corn field in northern Colorado.

The 24-year-old easily rattles off the various gadgets he uses to measure soil moisture, plant health, air temperature.

 

 


Today Paul Pepper and STEVE DULLE, 2015-16 Rotary Club District Governor, talk about the "Food Fight," which was a joint effort with The Food Bank for Central and Northeast Missouri to alleviate the hunger problem in Columbia and surrounding communities. Find out how much was raised! At [4:42] director MORGAN DENNEHY and actress DANA BOCKE tell us about Maplewood Barn's twist on their upcoming  production of Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing." (Hint: it involves pizza and football.) September 2, 2015

File Photo / KBIA

Fifty bridges were added to the list of bridges in critical condition across Missouri this year.

Samantha Sunne / KBIA

A Missouri man sentenced to life in prison for marijuana charges has been released after spending two decades behind bars.

Jacquie Blu / Flickr

Students at Hillsboro High School are starting conflicting protests over an effort by a transgender student to use the girl’s bathroom.

Cassie Marshall / Flickr

A Missouri appeals court will not hear a man's case regarding the dismissal of his affidavit claiming Ferguson officer Darren Wilson assaulted Michael Brown before fatally shooting him.

 

Courtesy WDBJ-TV

Who is the blame for the shooting deaths of WDBJ-TV journalists Alison Parker and Adam Ward? The easy answer to that question is the shooter -- but is there a deeper, more nuanced answer? Some point the finger at the gun lobby, others point it at failings in the mental health system. MSNBC's Joe Scarborough says it's the fault the of the 24-hour cable news networks.

Credit: Chris Murakami

Some gardeners go it alone finding that digging in the dirt is good medicine best taken in solitude.

For other gardeners, growing food with friends and neighbors makes everything taste sweeter.

On this installment of Farm Your Yard, the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture's Farm Manager Carrie Hargrove talked to local community gardeners Chris Murakami and Ellis Cole about how they came to be part of a community garden on St. James Street. 

Today Paul Pepper visits with NANETTE WARD, Volunteer Board Member, Central Missouri Stop Human Trafficking Coalition, and DOUG CARR, who along with his wife BARB, are the 2015 CMSHTC Abolitionists of the Year. Find out the Carrs' motivation to invest so much time and effort into this special cause. September 1, 2015

prison cell
mikecogh / Flickr

  The Missouri Department of Corrections is converting a Kansas City prison release center into a new type of facility.

The newly named Kansas City Re-Entry Center takes the place of the Kansas City Community Release Center, which for years released several hundred parolees daily into downtown Kansas City.

Beginning next month, the building in the city's West Bottoms will become a minimum-security prison, housing inmates nearing parole.

Brian Turner / Flickr

  A 43-year-old Columbia man has pleaded guilty in federal court to robbing six banks.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

  The Missouri Ethics Commission has found that lobbyists likely broke state laws requiring them to name lawmakers they buy meals for.

Gary Grigsby / KBIA

In the world of lighting, reducing energy costs rules the day especially in lighting used outside the home.


What happens when you put 9 students of all ages, an expert instructor and a teaching assistant together in a classroom with microphones for 7 days? Well, we tried it, and we got nine amazing pieces of student radio.

Val Vennet / Google Images

  Officials are planning a $7.3 million cleanup of a contaminated site in downtown Springfield.

The Springfield News-Leader reports officials have known for years that the land is contaminated. The land, which is owned by City Utilities, is in the Jordan Valley Corridor, a former industrial area that was once home to several factories.

Mike Kromrey, executive director of the Watershed Committee of the Ozarks, says the pollution is likely at least 150 years old.

school buses
Twix / Flickr

 A study that suggests a new strain of lice may be resistant to typical treatments comes as children are headed back to school, and some districts have loosened their attendance policies over students with the bugs.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that health experts say head lice aren't a sign of poor habits, as the tiny pests prefer clean hair. But those who work at Lice Busters say the social stigma attached to the lice remains, that only those living in dirty homes get infestations.

Sarah Kellogg / KBIA

After learning that a single resident has the ability to vote on a half-cent sales tax, the Columbia Business Loop’s Community Improvement District Board decided to postpone the election.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

 The 25-year-old son of Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has been cited for reportedly driving while intoxicated.

Willson Wheeler Nixon was pulled over around 3 a.m. Sunday after allegedly driving without turning on his headlights.

Columbia police arrested him for driving while intoxicated after he allegedly hit a parked car while being pulled over. He posted bond set at $500 at 8:30 a.m. Sunday.

A spokesman for Gov. Nixon says this is a private matter and did not comment further.

Today Paul Pepper visits with BRUCE BURKETT, Executive Director at Hep C Alliance, who reminds us that you should ask your doctor to specifically check for Hepatitis C. Are you a baby boomer? You could be the 1 in 30 that has the disease and doesn't know it! At [3:48] TIM REINBOTT, Superintendent of the MU Bradford Research Center, invites everyone to the 11th annual Bradford Farm Tomato Festival. You don't have to be an avid gardener to enjoy the sight of 190 types of tomatoes, plus many other veggies to see and taste - it's fun for the whole family! August 31, 2015

money
File Photo / Flickr

Starting this week, delinquent Missouri taxpayers can pay back taxes without penalties or interest under a temporary amnesty program. The program begins tomorrow and runs through November 30th. 

Participants must follow tax laws and pay on time for the next eight years or face paying previously waived fines and interest. Revenue department estimates show roughly 350,000 taxpayers could be eligible, potentially making the program one of the most high-impact legislative measures this year.

MO Department of Corrections

The Missouri Supreme Court has denied the latest legal challenges from a man scheduled to be executed tomorrow for raping and killing a 15-year-old Kansas City girl in 1989. 

The judges ruled Friday to overrule a motion that sought a stay of execution for Roderick Nunley. The court also rejected his request for a writ of habeas corpus, which allows prisoners to challenge their convictions on constitutional grounds.

Relatives are outraged after the Missouri Supreme Court decided wrongful death litigation can't go forward against a northwest Missouri hospital. 

Missouri State Highway Patrol

The Missouri State Highway Patrol says one of its troopers has died in a crash in northeast Missouri.

Trooper James M. Bava, 25, died when his vehicle crashed on Missouri Route FF in rural Audrain County. 

Cpl. Scott White says it's unclear how the accident happened. He says the trooper was following a motorcycle before the crash. His patrol vehicle was found after he did not respond to radio calls.

The motorcycle has not been found.

Karrie Banaghan / flickr

St. Louis' top elected officials are discussing whether to purchase body cameras for the city's police force, but finding money for the technology that's estimated to cost up to $2 million appears elusive.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that no action was taken on the issue at the Thursday meeting of the three-member Board of Estimate and Apportionment.

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