News

Journalists spent more than a year reporting on Monday’s historic eclipse. It only took three minutes for that event to become a footnote in history. Was the coverage worth it? Who watched it and how will it be remembered? Also, what’s ahead for Steve Bannon and Breitbart News now that he’s back at the alt-right news site following his departure from the White House, brands back off from advertising amid politically and racially-charged news coverage. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Legacy of Lead: The Right Place to Teach Mining

11 hours ago
Sophia Zheng / KBIA

Today, Missouri is home to three major lead districts and the state has accounted for more than 90 percent of the nation’s lead production over the last century. But actually getting that lead out of the ground requires a lot of scientific knowledge and the hard work of underground laborers. Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla plays an important role in the history of lead mining in Missouri.

“The university is really, really good,” Professor Paul Worsey said, “It’s got a good reputation, for practical engineers.”

Fencing surrounds a patch of grass that used to be a neighborhood in the center of Herculaneum, Missouri. A sign in the grass reads, "No Trespassing. Lead Contamination."
Bram Sable-Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

Bill Haggard is the mayor of Herculaneum, Missouri, a town of 4,000 about a 30 minute drive south of St. Louis. He’s also the fire chief, president of the historical society and a retired teacher, among other distinctions, although he identifies first as a “lifelong resident.”

For more than a century this town was built up around the lead smelter that sat along the Mississippi River. Today, though, most of the houses remaining in the hollowed out center of town are marked in spray paint with a bright orange ‘X.’

“If they have an ‘X’ on them they’re coming down,” Haggard says while driving by houses slated for demolition.

Today Paul Pepper and JANE WHITESIDES talk about the upcoming auditions for the Missouri Symphony Society's two youth orchestras. Children in grades 3-12 are welcome to join. Watch for details! At [3:55] self-declared "freezer cooking evangelists"/bloggers/co-authors, RACHEL TIEMEYER and POLLY CONNER, tell us about their new book, "From Freezer to Table." It contains over 75 recipes for that family on-the-go who doesn't want to eat out all the time, but also doesn't have time to prepare healthy meals every night! August 23, 2017

File / KBIA

Backlash continues after a Missouri state lawmaker temporarily posted a comment on Facebook in which she expressed hope that President Donald Trump would be assassinated.

Republican Lt. Gov. Mike Parson sent a letter to legislators Tuesday asking for a special session to oust Democratic Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal. The St. Louis-area lawmaker has resisted calls to resign for posting the comment last week that said: "I hope Trump is assassinated!"

David Wilson / Flickr

The family of a 15-year-old who was incarcerated for three weeks despite dashcam video proving his innocence is suing Kansas City police.

The Kansas City Star reports the wrongful arrest suit was filed Monday in federal court in behalf of Tyree Bell. He was arrested on June 8, 2016, while walking home from summer school. The suit says Bell was identified as the armed suspect who had fled from officers in the area minutes earlier.

NAACP Forum Draws a Crowd to Talk About Community Policing, Other Issues

17 hours ago
Flickr

With a larger turnout than organizers expected, an NAACP forum on community policing, equity and civility on Tuesday night had to move into the sanctuary at the Second Baptist Church downtown to accommodate more than 100 people.

The forum brought engaged members of the community together to talk about racial profiling, violence, economic opportunity and mental health. Local activists have been working for more than two years to create a community policing philosophy and increase equity for marginalized groups in Columbia.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA


  With a tackle box and a fishing pole, Gary Sanders baits his hook with a worm and casts his line into the river outside of Desloge, Missouri.

 

“I caught a couple little bass,” he says. ”I think they were small mouth. They weren’t very big. They were only about that big -- only 6 inches long.”

Sanders is posted up at the Big River. He moved here from St. Louis a few years ago to live a more outdoors lifestyle. You won’t see him or many other fishermen in this area take home their catch for a fish fry though. That’s because these waters are still dealing with lingering contamination from lead mining.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Journalists spent more than a year reporting on Monday’s historic eclipse. It only took three minutes for that event to become a footnote in history. Was the coverage worth it? Who watched it and how will it be remembered? 

Missouri Department of Conservation

Discover Nature this week as a swift-flying, migratory duck begins returning to Missouri from the north.


Today Paul Pepper visits with TIM RICH, Executive Director of Welcome Home, an emergency and transitional shelter for homeless veterans. Tim says that the relatively new term 'rapid rehousing program' fits their mission because, "we have learned through research...if you get a homeless vet into housing, and get that stabilized, then you can work on all the other issues." August 22, 2017

Preliminary MU Enrollment Statistics Offer Mixed Picture

Aug 22, 2017

  Preliminary MU enrollment figures show a freshman class smaller than last year’s but larger than administrators predicted in May. MU reported more than 4,100 freshmen began classes Monday, the first day of the fall semester. That represents a 14.6 percent decline from last year’s first-day freshman count. The 2016 figure was down 22.7 percent from 2015.

Proposed Increase in Transit Fares Sparks Discussion at Council Meeting

Aug 22, 2017
File

  City Manager Mike Matthes’ proposal to increase transit fares ruffled some feathers in the disabled community at Monday night’s regular City Council meeting.

In his recommendations for the city’s fiscal year 2018 budget, Matthes suggested that the council increase para-transit fares from $2 to $3 per ride to earn revenue for a transit system that has struggled to pull its weight in recent years. The increase in fares would generate an additional $50,000 per year for the city.

Missouri Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill is investing in fundraising and campaign management more than a year in advance of the 2018 elections.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Monday that McCaskill's spending shows how she's laying the groundwork for her campaign as she faces a competitive re-election bid.

McCaskill had raised close to $8 million as of June. She's told donors at private events that she expects to raise and spend at least $30 million. The newspaper reports she's leaning on Democratic fundraising platform ActBlue to fundraise.

Patrick Giblin / flcikr

People from around the world converged on Missouri to watch the solar eclipse.

Among the crowd that gathered Monday at the Missouri Capitol were husband and wife David Colon and Mariana Perez, from Alajuela, Costa Rica. They flew along with his brother to Oklahoma, where their mother lives, and then drove as a family to Jefferson City.

They said the long trip was well worth it.

As the total eclipse faded, Perez said: "It's amazing — I mean, God is amazing."

Today Paul Pepper visits with JIM STEELE, editor of the book, "Howard Co., MO: From Prairie Land to Promised Land." Three years in the making, this passion project features about 265 photos, some of which date back to the 1800s! Whether you're a serious history buff or a casual history buff, this book is a wonderful opportunity to step back in time. (Check out the photo of a young Kit Bond on the square in Fayette!) August 21, 2017

Parks officials in Kansas City, Missouri, say an 83-year-old Confederate memorial will be removed after it was vandalized.

The Missouri Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Kansas City Parks and Recreation officials to remove the monument from its current location along of the city's main streets to a place of safety. That came after someone painted what appeared to be a red hammer and sickle on the "Loyal Women of the Old South" memorial late Friday or early Saturday.

Missouri State Parks officials say they can't verify that solar eclipse glasses the agency sold meet safety standards and are warning people not to use them.

The agency on Friday warned people not to use PMS Promo Mart eclipse glasses and viewers sold at parks and historic sites in Missouri during Monday's solar eclipse. People who purchased the glasses can return them for a full refund.

Department of Natural Resources spokeswoman Renee Bungart said it's unclear how many PMS Promo Mart glasses were sold, but the agency purchased 25,000.

NASA

Missouri State Parks officials say they can't verify that solar eclipse glasses the agency sold meet safety standards and are warning people not to use them.

The agency on Friday warned people not to use PMS Promo Mart eclipse glasses sold at parks and historic sites in Missouri during Monday's solar eclipse. People who purchased the glasses can return them for a full refund.

An Associated Press request for more information wasn't immediately answered Friday.

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

Attorneys for a Missouri man convicted of killing a former St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter 19 years ago are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to halt the prisoner's execution scheduled for next week.

Marcellus Williams is set to die by injection Tuesday at the state prison in Bonne Terre for fatally stabbing Lisha Gayle during a 1998 robbery at her home in University City.

Authorities are investigating whether police were targeted when someone tossed an explosive device at a patrol car along a Missouri highway.

No one was injured Thursday when the device detonated on the pavement behind a westbound police patrol vehicle along Missouri 58 in Raymore, a Kansas City suburb. Investigators say the device was thrown from an eastbound vehicle.

John Ham is a spokesman for the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Ham says the device was "likely homemade" and could've caused "severe injury." He declined to provide further details.

Missouri Senate

A Missouri lawmaker who temporarily posted a Facebook comment hoping for President Donald Trump's assassination could face an effort to remove her from office.

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens and Lt. Gov. Mike Parson on Friday both said state senators should oust Democratic Sen. Maria Chapelle-Nadal from office.

Numerous top Democratic and Republican officials in Missouri have called upon Chappelle-Nadal to resign because of the Facebook comment she wrote and later deleted Thursday. But the lawmaker from the St. Louis area has said she won't step down.

Claire McCaskilll
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Two U.S. senators from Kansas and Missouri say an emphasis on protecting the nation's food supply has waned since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and it's time to make the issue a priority again.

Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Democrat from Missouri, and Sen Pat Roberts, a Kansas Republican, met Friday with government, education and private officials involved in ensuring the nation is prepared to protect food, agriculture and livestock from terrorism and infectious diseases.

Stephens College

A former dean at a Missouri women's college is suing the school for allegedly creating "a hostile work environment based on gender."

The Columbia Missourian reports the lawsuit was filed Wednesday in state court by Carole Chabries, a former dean of graduate and continuing studies at Stephens College.

She says she made a complaint about Vice President of Academic Affairs Leslie Willey, alleging Willey said "a woman might need to step back from her career to take care of her family" in response to time Chabries had spent away from campus.

TheLoopComo / Instagram

The Business Loop Community Improvement District, or the Loop CID aims to make a historic commercial artery in Columbia a more inviting place to visit and shop. Funded via a sales tax and voluntary tax among property owners, Loop leaders are planning their future. The Loop CID's Director Carrie Gartner and Board Chair Dave Griggs visited with KBIA's Trevor Harris about their plans for the future of The Loop.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back ANGELA SPECK, Professor of Astronomy at the University of Missouri! In her fourth and final appearance (related to this Monday's solar eclipse, natch), Angela tells us about the dangers of staring at the sun. Her advice? If you can see any part of the sun, wear your solar eclipse glasses! August 18, 2017

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