News

hermannmo.com

  The city of Hermann is suing state utility groups over the costs of electricity from a southern Illinois coal plant.

Mayor Tom Shabel says the costs are much higher than promised when the Prairie State Energy Campus was marketed to smaller towns across the Midwest. He says the city lost close to $1 million last year, causing economic damage to the town of 2,500.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the city this month sued the Missouri Joint Municipal Electric Utility Commission and the Missouri Public Energy Pool, which buy power for municipalities around the state.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts.

Alberto G. / FLICKR

  Fulton Public Schools has changed the principal of Fulton Middle School after the district self-reported federal privacy law violations on Monday.

The school district confirmed Christopher Crane is no longer at the school.

The district informed the US Department of Education of the violations that occurred on March 20 when gym teachers asked students a series of identifying questions as part of an exercise called “Claim It.” During the exercise, students were asked to step forward if an identifying detail applied to them.

Some of the questions were about sensitive topics included sexual behavior, mental or psychological problems, and religion. According to federal law, these questions require a parent’s consent before a student is required to answer them.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

  Despite concerns from Republican lawmakers about Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon's withholding money from programs this year, most of his 2015 supplemental budget request is moving forward.

A Missouri House panel on Tuesday approved additional spending for 2015, including $120 million in general funds.

Republican lawmakers have previously criticized the request while the governor's office continues to withhold about $451 million from other priorities this year.

Spence Jackson / Linkedin

  The note left by the Missouri auditor's spokesman before his apparent suicide said "I just can't take being unemployed again."

Jefferson City Police Capt. Doug Shoemaker said Tuesday that the note from Spence Jackson was dated March 27.

Shoemaker also said Jackson died from a single gunshot wound to the head. Jackson was found dead Sunday in his Jefferson City apartment.

The ADA Legacy Tour Visits Mid-MO

7 hours ago
KBIA

The American Disability Act Legacy Tour stopped in Columbia on Monday. The bus stopped at Activity and Recreation Center at University of Missouri at 9 a.m. before it moved to the Speaker’s Circle at 12:30 p.m.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes PAT RILEY, Moberly Area Community College, and MACC student, STEPHANIE HERMAN. If you're a high school junior or senior, a job-seeker, or in need of a new career in mid-Missouri, you won't want to miss this job expo happening Wednesday, April 8th. Did I mention free pizza and door prizes? Watch for details! March 31, 2015

j. stephenconn / Flickr

The Missouri House is moving forward with a measure that would limit growth in the state's spending based on increases in population and inflation.

columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

Colleges across the nation are discussing whether or not to continue to offer health insurance plans to their students. High plan costs for students and provisions in the Affordable Care Act are some of the main factors driving the decision.

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson/KBIA

  In the past, alternative schools have been associated with their negative reputations. It’s typically understood as the place where the “bad kids” go. However, from the outside looking in, Frederick Douglass High School looks like the average school. But the reality is Douglass is not a typical school. It’s an alternative school. However, the school’s non-traditional approach to student learning started to catch wind. Douglass has broken down the barrier of stereotypes with the help of a cooking class and a teacher.


Afternoon Newscast for March 30, 2015

Mar 30, 2015
Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

  Last year’s unrest in Ferguson is causing new problems for the St. Louis County police department.

Four journalists arrested during last summer’s protests are suing the department for civil rights violations and unlawful detention.

Spence Jackson / Linkedin

  Investigators have found a note Missouri auditor’s office spokesman Robert “Spence” Jackson wrote before his apparent suicide.

Jefferson City Police Captain Doug Shoemaker announced the finding Monday, but wouldn’t reveal what it said.

Under The Microscope: Frank Booth and the 'Exercise Apex.'

Mar 30, 2015
Rachel Zamzow

MU Exercise Physiology Professor Frank Booth doesn’t just talk the talk on exercise. He runs the run. His regiment, when it allows, is to jump on treadmill in his office — yes, in his office — twice a day for high-intensity interval training.   

Booth also regularly runs the 1.3-mile route from his home to his office, using his car only for big errands like trips to the grocery store.

And sometimes, his dog –  a lab-boxer mix named Run — yes, Run — comes along for the jog.

But Booth’s hobby is indiscernible from his work life. His main goal through his research is to inform people of the true danger of not getting enough exercise. And in the early 2000's he coined a term in for this very risk: sedentary death syndrome.  


Public domain

This year is the 25th anniversary year of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act. On this Thinking Out Loud, Darren Hellwege visits with Chuck Graham of the Great Plains ADA Center about the history of the Act and the current status of disability rights in the US and Missouri. They also discuss the ADA Legacy Project, which is in Mid-Missouri this week as part of a nationwide tour.


Tom Schweich’s Media Director Spence Jackson Found Dead

Mar 30, 2015
Spence Jackson / Linkedin

Missouri state official Spence Jackson, who was the media director for Tom Schweich, was found dead Sunday from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound according to the Jefferson City Police Department. He was 44.

Jackson’s apparent suicide comes about one month after Missouri State Auditor Schweich’s suicide last month.

Jackson had become very outspoken about Schweich’s suicide. He called for the resignation of Republican state Chairman John Hancock, because of Schweich’s allegation that Hancock had conducted an anti-Semitic “whispering campaign” against Schweich.

Today Paul Pepper chats with HEATHER STEWART, Services for Independent Living, and CHUCK GRAHAM, Great Plains ADA, about two events happening today (3/30/15), and one tomorrow at the State Capitol! Our discussion also touches on what the ADA has done for those who need it. As Chuck says: "it's changed our world." March 30, 2015

j. stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri GOP lawmakers still are grappling for consensus at the Legislature's midway point.

The most Republicans ever in the House have helped speed the passage of abortion restrictions and a bill to bar mandatory union fees.

RAY HOWZE / ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Missouri gubernatorial candidate Catherine Hanaway is resuming her campaign after taking a monthlong break because of the suicide of Republican rival Tom Schweich.

Jessica Naudziunas / KBIA

Missouri beer lovers could buy freshly filled growlers of draft beers at convenience and grocery stores under two proposals brewing in the Legislature.

Columbia-based novelist Keija Parssinen’s first book, The Ruins of Us, was a Columbia One Read selection in 2013. The novel centered is around a crumbling marriage between an American expat and her Saudi billionaire husband. Parssinen’s new novel, The Unraveling of Mercy Louis, is set closer to home: it takes place in a small Texas refinery town that grows increasingly zealous in its attempts to control its population of teenage girls. The town’s paranoia builds toward an outbreak of mass hysteria and a modern-day witch trial. Parssinen spoke with KBIA about the research behind her new book; she began by comparing the Saudi Arabia of her first book with the Texas town she describes in her new novel.


Off the Clock: New Ownership, New Changes at Columbia's Blue Note

Mar 27, 2015
Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

Other than the Missouri Theatre — the Blue Note and Rose Music Hall, formerly known as Mojo’s — are two of the most established concert venues in not only Columbia, but in Mid-Missouri.

For the past 34 years, the venues grew up and flourished under the supervision of one person — Richard King. However, at the tail end of last year, King sold the spaces to the owners of the Majestic Theatre in Madison, Wisconsin. While the sale wasn’t necessarily unexpected, it did prompt many venue-goers to wonder what would happen to the cherished institution — mostly — what changes, if any, would be visible.


Deported for a Tweet

Mar 27, 2015
AP/Today's Zaman

This week on Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg takes you around the world for a series of stories on the challenges of journalism in a rapidly changing world.

*Mahir Zeynalov, an Azerbaijani columnist for Turkey's Today's Zaman newspaper, speaks with Global Journalist's Jason McLure about being deported from Turkey for his Twitter use.

Today Paul Pepper visits with DINA McPHERSON, Mizzou Therapy Services, and MOLLY DEIMEKE. Dina and Molly both have first-hand knowledge of brain injuries - hear their stories and find out what they're doing to raise awareness! March 27, 2015

Missouri Department of Corrections

The Missouri Supreme Court has scheduled a May 12th execution for a former St. Louis jailer convicted of hiring someone to kill his ex-wife in 2000. 

Fulton Public Schools has launched an investigation into a teacher-led activity referred to as a "survey" that has upset participating students and parents.

The Fulton Sun reports that during a Fulton Middle School physical education class on Friday, teachers conducted an activity called "Claim It," in which students were read various statements about their identity. If the statement applied to a student's life, he or she stepped forward in a line, according to the "Claim It" activity materials.

Null Value / Flickr

The attorney for a man accused of shooting and wounding two police officers during a demonstration in Ferguson says his client had nothing to do with the incident and police should be searching for the real shooter. 

Columbia College
File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia College Board of Trustees will vote in April on a proposal to split the college into separate schools.

Pages