News

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An Alabama man has been arrested on suspicion of committing a hate crime against Muslims in Columbia.

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A Missouri judge has ruled that a right-to-farm constitutional amendment doesn't protect a woman who allegedly grew marijuana in her basement.

The Jefferson City News Tribune reports Cole County Circuit Judge Dan Green ruled Tuesday that a woman charged with growing pot isn't covered by the amendment.

Jefferson City police arrested Lisa A. Loesch in 2012. Her public defender said the judge should set aside a grand jury indictment of the woman, arguing that growing marijuana is protected by the right to farm. 

Today Paul Pepper visits with RUTH O'NEIL, Boone County Volunteer Coordinator for Heart of Missouri CASA, about the 2nd annual "Justice is Served" fundraiser, happening October 22nd. In the hot seat this year? The Columbia Daily Tribune's Vicki Russell! Unfamiliar with CASA's mission or interested in volunteering? Watch! At [5:04] MARIE ROBERTON, Director and Co-Owner of Dancearts, lets everyone know about upcoming classes for boys and girls, young and old, with all ranges of experience! September 3, 2015

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

The Missouri attorney general's office said a home security company accused of misleading consumers has to pay $50,000 to Missouri customers. 

The woman who would have been the only voter on a proposed sales tax increase for a downtown Columbia business district says she would have voted against the measure. 

HOK/360 ARCHITECTURE

The architects of a new football stadium in St. Louis are planning an arena that will offer more than just football games.

  It seems every few weeks we’re talking about another shooting incident. Why is that? MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough puts the blame on the 24-hour cable news networks. Is it a fair criticism? Also, President Obama’s appearance on an NBC reality show, press freedoms challenged at student publications across the country, and athletic teams’ game changing decision regarding access for credentialed journalists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Emerald O'Brien / KBIA

As mobile health technologies like Fitbits and Apple Health become more common, better health seems inevitable. But much of the data that users can now track never actually reaches their doctors.

That’s one of the problems University of Missouri psychiatrist Dr. Ganesh Gopalakrishna faced while treating his patients with various mental illnesses. While some of his patients were logging their activity, both mental and physical, he couldn’t get a good record of it.


Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Jeff Siegfried knows just about anything you’d ever want to find out about a 50-acre corn field in northern Colorado.

The 24-year-old easily rattles off the various gadgets he uses to measure soil moisture, plant health, air temperature.

 

 


Today Paul Pepper and STEVE DULLE, 2015-16 Rotary Club District Governor, talk about the "Food Fight," which was a joint effort with The Food Bank for Central and Northeast Missouri to alleviate the hunger problem in Columbia and surrounding communities. Find out how much was raised! At [4:42] director MORGAN DENNEHY and actress DANA BOCKE tell us about Maplewood Barn's twist on their upcoming  production of Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing." (Hint: it involves pizza and football.) September 2, 2015

File Photo / KBIA

Fifty bridges were added to the list of bridges in critical condition across Missouri this year.

Samantha Sunne / KBIA

A Missouri man sentenced to life in prison for marijuana charges has been released after spending two decades behind bars.

Jacquie Blu / Flickr

Students at Hillsboro High School are starting conflicting protests over an effort by a transgender student to use the girl’s bathroom.

Cassie Marshall / Flickr

A Missouri appeals court will not hear a man's case regarding the dismissal of his affidavit claiming Ferguson officer Darren Wilson assaulted Michael Brown before fatally shooting him.

 

Courtesy WDBJ-TV

Who is the blame for the shooting deaths of WDBJ-TV journalists Alison Parker and Adam Ward? The easy answer to that question is the shooter -- but is there a deeper, more nuanced answer? Some point the finger at the gun lobby, others point it at failings in the mental health system. MSNBC's Joe Scarborough says it's the fault the of the 24-hour cable news networks.

Credit: Chris Murakami

Some gardeners go it alone finding that digging in the dirt is good medicine best taken in solitude.

For other gardeners, growing food with friends and neighbors makes everything taste sweeter.

On this installment of Farm Your Yard, the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture's Farm Manager Carrie Hargrove talked to local community gardeners Chris Murakami and Ellis Cole about how they came to be part of a community garden on St. James Street. 

Today Paul Pepper visits with NANETTE WARD, Volunteer Board Member, Central Missouri Stop Human Trafficking Coalition, and DOUG CARR, who along with his wife BARB, are the 2015 CMSHTC Abolitionists of the Year. Find out the Carrs' motivation to invest so much time and effort into this special cause. September 1, 2015

prison cell
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  The Missouri Department of Corrections is converting a Kansas City prison release center into a new type of facility.

The newly named Kansas City Re-Entry Center takes the place of the Kansas City Community Release Center, which for years released several hundred parolees daily into downtown Kansas City.

Beginning next month, the building in the city's West Bottoms will become a minimum-security prison, housing inmates nearing parole.

Brian Turner / Flickr

  A 43-year-old Columbia man has pleaded guilty in federal court to robbing six banks.

Missouri Capitol
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  The Missouri Ethics Commission has found that lobbyists likely broke state laws requiring them to name lawmakers they buy meals for.

Gary Grigsby / KBIA

In the world of lighting, reducing energy costs rules the day especially in lighting used outside the home.


What happens when you put 9 students of all ages, an expert instructor and a teaching assistant together in a classroom with microphones for 7 days? Well, we tried it, and we got nine amazing pieces of student radio.

Val Vennet / Google Images

  Officials are planning a $7.3 million cleanup of a contaminated site in downtown Springfield.

The Springfield News-Leader reports officials have known for years that the land is contaminated. The land, which is owned by City Utilities, is in the Jordan Valley Corridor, a former industrial area that was once home to several factories.

Mike Kromrey, executive director of the Watershed Committee of the Ozarks, says the pollution is likely at least 150 years old.

school buses
Twix / Flickr

 A study that suggests a new strain of lice may be resistant to typical treatments comes as children are headed back to school, and some districts have loosened their attendance policies over students with the bugs.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that health experts say head lice aren't a sign of poor habits, as the tiny pests prefer clean hair. But those who work at Lice Busters say the social stigma attached to the lice remains, that only those living in dirty homes get infestations.

Sarah Kellogg / KBIA

After learning that a single resident has the ability to vote on a half-cent sales tax, the Columbia Business Loop’s Community Improvement District Board decided to postpone the election.

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