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Pitch: #6 Karaoke

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The ingenuity of a phonograph’s mechanism may incite the inventive genius to its improvement, but I could not imagine that a performance by it would ever inspire embryotic Mendelssohn, Beethovens, Mozarts, and Wagners to the acquirement of technical skill, or to the grasp of human possibilities in the art.

When music can be heard in the homes without the labor of study and close application… it will be simply a question of time when the amateur disappears entirely.

-John Philip Sousa, September 1906

 

KBIA file photo

An eastern Missouri deputy has resigned after allegedly putting pepper spray on pizza before giving it to inmates.

Scott Davidson via Flickr

Another St. Louis area police officer is out of a job over threats to Ferguson shooting protesters found online.

columbia city hall
File photo / KBIA

  Columbia's sewer system is aging and deteriorating. The city council took steps to address the problem, but not without controversy. 

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Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says the state and St. Louis-area economic development groups and lenders are committing up to $1 million in support to businesses affected by racial unrest that followed the shooting death of an unarmed black 18-year-old by a white police officer.

Nixon says he's designated State Treasurer Clint Zweifel to oversee the distribution of no-interest loans to Ferguson businesses harmed by looting and rioting since the August 9th death of Michael Brown.

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A Missouri judge says he will likely reject a legal challenge to a November ballot measure that would link teacher evaluations to their students' performance.

Cole County Circuit Judge Dan Green heard arguments Thursday in a lawsuit seeking to strike the initiative from the ballot. The lawsuit alleges the measure contains multiple subjects and amends more than one part of the Missouri Constitution.

Afterward, Green said he was leaning toward ruling for those defending the ballot measure.

Missouri Department of Tourism

Dozens of new Missouri laws are taking effect, including ones that could make it harder for some fired employees to collect unemployment benefits and easier for high rollers to bet big bucks at casinos.

Thursday marked the standard effective date for laws that were passed during annual legislative session.

But some of this year's most high-profile measures contained clauses delaying their effect until future years, including an income tax cut and a rewrite of the state's criminal laws.

Null Value via Flickr

A federal lawsuit alleges that police in Ferguson and St. Louis County used excessive force and falsely arrested innocent bystanders amid attempts to quell widespread unrest after the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Scott Davidson via Flickr

A suburban St. Louis police officer shown on cellphone video pointing his rifle at demonstrators in Ferguson and threatening them is now out of a job.

St. Ann Police Chief Aaron Jimenez confirmed in an interview with The Associated Press that police Lieutenant Ray Albers resigned Thursday. A phone call seeking comment from Albers was not returned.

The confrontation happened August 19th during protests that followed the Ferguson police shooting death of Michael Brown.

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What one journalist, and former KBIA reporter, witnessed other reporters do in Ferguson, Mo. led him to stop filing stories. Al Jazeera freelancer Ryan Schuessler wrote a personal blog post detailing the disrespectful actions he saw and why he decided to leave (for now). Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

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v1ctor Casale / Flickr

A 27-year-old man is in custody as a person of interest for the death of a 6-year-old central Missouri boy.

The Fulton Sun reports the man was taken into custody Thursday morning in a Sedalia trailer park on a Pettis County warrant for littering.

Missouri State Highway Patrol spokesman Sgt. Paul Reinsch told the newspaper the Callaway County Sheriff's Office called the patrol at 3:15 a.m. asking to use its helicopter to search for a suspect in the Little Dixie Conservation area, near Millersburg.

The cost of extra policing in Ferguson after rioting and looting that followed the police shooting death of an unarmed 18-year-old could cost local, Missouri and federal taxpayers millions of dollars.

St. Louis County Chief Operating Officer Garry Earls estimates the county spent $1.5 million in police overtime to deal with unrest in the St. Louis suburb since Michael Brown's death Aug. 9.

Rainbow flag
File Photo / KBIA

A southwest Missouri fire department that was considering extending benefits to an employee who is in a same-sex marriage has been told the state's Constitution won't allow it.

Last week, the Ozark Fire Department appeared ready to change its policy so it could offer the benefits to female captain Andi Mooneyham.

The Springfield News-Leader reports the department's attorney told its board that the Missouri Constitution does not allow the policy change because of an amendment that defines marriage as between a man and a woman.

Oklahoma Joe's

The well-known Oklahoma Joe's Bar-B-Que restaurant is changing its name to reflect that it has no ties to Oklahoma.

The restaurant, which has three locations in the Kansas City area, will be known as Joe's Kansas City Bar-B-Que by the end of the year.

The restaurant has made several national lists of best barbeque stops. It has attracted celebrity diners and recently served about $1,400 worth of food to Air Force One when President Barack Obama was in Kansas City.

Marijuana industry faces food safety test

Aug 28, 2014
Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

When Colorado legalized recreational marijuana use earlier this year, it also opened up the sale of food products infused with the drug to anyone over the age of 21. 

sewer materials
FaceMePLS / Flickr

Seventeen million gallons of waste flow through Columbia's sewers every day. Beneath the streets, large metal pipes snake and twist their way across the city. 

Ultimately, they wind their way to Columbia's wastewater treatment plant in the southwest part of the city. Altogether, Columbia has about 695 miles of sewer pipes servicing the city. That's longer than a round trip to Chicago. 

Courtesy Columbia Daily Tribune

When the Columbia Daily Tribune published an editorial cartoon about looting in Ferguson, Managing Editor Jim Robertson said the intent was to be provocative. What some readers saw was racism. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

roy blunt
TalkMediaNews / Flickr

U.S. Senator Roy Blunt is asking the Justice Department to help reimburse state and St. Louis-area law enforcement agencies for costs incurred while providing security in Ferguson this month.

Blunt said in a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder Wednesday that many of the police agencies do not have the resources to respond to the level of unrest that occurred in the wake of the shooting of Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer on Aug. 9th. Blunt, a Republican, says the unanticipated cost may force many agencies to seek out additional resources.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

Missouri dairy farmers are urging lawmakers to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of legislation authorizing financial incentives for their industry.

The dairy cattle incentives are included in two broader agriculture bills that Nixon vetoed because they would shift regulation of deer farms from the Conservation Department to the Agriculture Department.

The deer provisions have dominated the public debate about the bills.

But the Missouri Dairy Association says the proposed industry incentives are important to keep farmers from closing their dairy operations.

columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

A federal appeals court has ruled that course syllabi are exempt from Missouri's open records law because they are the intellectual property of faculty members.

Joe Gratz / Flickr

A prominent criminal defense attorney is raising concerns about a Missouri ballot measure that would allow allegations of past wrongdoing to be used against people facing child sex abuse charges.

An editorial cartoon in the Columbia Daily Tribune sparks cries of racism from readers, the Huffington Post names a new “Ferguson Fellow” to spend a year looking into how the St. Louis County police department got its military-grade equipment, and a young journalist speaks out on why it’s time step out of Ferguson and let the region heal.  Also, how Facebook comments led a cops reporter to quit and a police chief to lose his job, why CNN will soon be doing less with less and ESPN’s reporting on Michael Sam’s shower habits. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Billion dollar day care

Aug 27, 2014
Nori / Flickr

    

Zsanay Duran lives at the end of a cul-de-sac in her neighborhood in Springfield, Mo. Inside her house looks less like a home and more like a daycare center.

Duran began providing unlicensed home daycare sort of by accident. Last fall when she was looking for work for her teenage son, she came across a posting on craigslist from a mother who was desperate for childcare. The woman had an 8 month old baby and worked the 5am shift at a local fast-food chain. She could only afford $12 a day for childcare. Duran said her story really hit home.

“I was a single mom and I needed help in order to get on my feet and that’s why someone did for me,” Duran said. “And if I can help someone else get on their feet, why not?”

Courtesy Columbia Daily Tribune

This editorial cartoon, published in the August 20, 2014 edition of the Columbia Daily Tribune drew cries of racism from readers who worry the imagery paints Missouri as a "racist and backwater region."

Managing Editor Jim Robertson said he thought it was provocative, but its intent was not racism.

United Soybean Board/Flickr

Farmers’ can anticipate a sharp drop in income this year, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

In fact, the USDA predicts the $113 billion earned in 2014 will be the lowest amount of net farm income in five years. That’s equal to about a 14 percent fall from last year’s record amount, thanks mostly to a massive drop in crop prices.

  More than 70 people were on hand for a ribbon cutting ceremony today for Columbia’s first compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station. 

Two of the pumps at the fueling station are reserved for the city of Columbia’s vehicle fleet. A third pump is open to private trucks while a fourth will be made available upon demand. The ribbon cutting comes just under a year after the Columbia City Council approved a partnership with California based company Clean Energy Fuels.

Trevor Harris/KBIA

Many people work behind the scenes to enliven Columbia's public access television channel, CAT-TV. This week KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with a handful of CAT founders, members and staff to find out how they use the medium of television to get their voices heard. Also on this week's program, Trevor talks with Peter Hatch, director of gardens and grounds at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home outside Charlottesville, Virginia. Hatch visited Columbia this week for a series of lectures celebration of the MU Botanic Garden's 15th anniversary.


Pitch Encore: MOULTY

Aug 26, 2014

 

The second episode of Season 2 comes out next week, but we have a little something for you today — a new series we’re calling “Encore.” On our off weeks, we’ll give you a fun, interesting, or weird tidbit that we weren’t able to include in our last episode.

KBIA file photo

An eastern Missouri jail officer has been suspended with pay after inmates accused him of putting pepper spray on pizza before giving it to them.

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