News

Reports: Alexander Cartwright to be named next MU chancellor

4 hours ago

A campus leader at the State University of New York is expected to be named as the next chancellor at MU, according to reports from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

According to the report, Alexander Cartwright, a provost and executive vice chancellor at SUNY is expected to be named the next chancellor.

Morning Newscast for May 23, 2017

6 hours ago

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including:

- The latest from the Missouri legislature's special session

Catholics Challenge St. Louis' 'Abortion Sanctuary' Law

New Software to Help Columbia Schools Save Money, Paper and Time


Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Some St. Louis Catholics are suing the city over an ordinance that protects women against workplace discrimination based on whether they've had an abortion, used contraceptives or are pregnant.

The federal lawsuit was filed Monday on behalf of a group of Roman Catholic grade schools; a home for pregnant women; and a private company whose owner is Catholic. It seeks to stop the city from enforcing the ordinance, which opponents say makes St. Louis a sanctuary city for abortion.

Today Paul Pepper visits with NADIA NAVARRETE-TINDALL about edible plants here in Missouri. The Lincoln University Native Plants program is hosting a free food tasting event this week featuring recipes that include (edible) native plants. Watch for details! At [4:25] MAKENZIE MABRY and JESS KANSMAN invite everyone to the next Science on Tap CoMo event tomorrow night at Craft Beer Cellar in downtown Columbia! Jess is one of two featured speakers; she'll be talking about how plants defend themselves against insect attacks. (Did you know that plants can call for help?!) May 23, 2017

Missouri School of Journalism

 Let’s take a couple of minutes to celebrate the accomplishments of the 99th Missouri General Assembly, which finished its 2017 session a week ago.

We won’t need much more time than that.

Our elected representatives passed a record-low number of bills. That is almost certainly a good thing, considering the import of most of those that were sent to Gov. Greitens. 

Still, there is cause for celebration. That cause begins with the legislators’ agreement to defy the governor and fully fund the K-12 public school Foundation Formula for the first time. Even there, we have to note that they trimmed down the formula from its original scale. But this action stands out as by far the most significant victory for their constituents... 

Read the complete column at the Missourian.

 

Today Paul Pepper visits with TAMI HARRIS, RN, about the warning signs and symptoms of a stroke. May is 'Stroke Awareness Month,' and so MU Health Care wants us all to know what it means to think 'FAST' - it could save your life. At [3:28] actress LACEY WILLIAMS and director BRIAN HARPER invite everyone to come see "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown" at The Little Theatre of Jefferson City. In describing this fun, family-friendly show, Brian says that there's "no serious message; it's the cartoon strips on the stage." The curtain goes up on June 8th in the Capital city! May 22, 2017

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has named a longtime banker as the acting director of the state's Division of Financial Institutions.

The governor announced in a news release Friday that Lee Keith will be the state's new finance director.

Keith was the former president of Gold Bank in St. Joseph, Missouri, and also led banks in Sullivan, Springfield, and Columbia, Missouri. He recently led a turnaround effort for Mercantile Bank in Quincy, Illinois.

Keith's appointment will be subject to Senate confirmation.

students in classroom
Rachel Rice / KBIA

Missouri school districts are looking forward to the possibility of more funding for early childhood education next year.

Lawmakers this year, for the first time in recent memory, hit their self-imposed target for school funding at roughly $3.4 billion. That triggers a law that requires the state to spend more next year on pre-K education.

It's a move that Republicans have lauded as a monumental step for education. But some educators and lawmakers question whether the state can afford it.

Draft Budget Plan for MU Calls for Cutting 328 Jobs

May 21, 2017
KBIA

A draft budget for MU's upcoming school year released late Friday night called for eliminating $40.6 million in recurring costs and $18.9 million in one-time costs, according to a memo from MU Interim Chancellor Garnett Stokes.

umkc.edu

University of Missouri-Kansas City officials say the school plans to cut about 30 jobs as part of efforts to reduce the campus budget.

University of Missouri System President Mun Choi said last month the system's four campuses must impose 8 to 12 percent budget reductions for fiscal year 2018 to prepare for an expected drop in state aid.

Missouri-Kansas City announced the layoffs Thursday but added no details about which jobs will be eliminated.

Fibonacci Blue / Flickr

Missouri is asking a federal appellate court to put on hold a judge's order blocking the state's abortion-restricting rules, insisting the requirements are justified.

The state's challenge Thursday to the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals came a day after U.S. District Judge Howard Sachs refused to delay enforcing the preliminary injunction he issued last month in favor of Planned Parenthood affiliates with Missouri health centers.

Steve Corsi/Missouri Governor's Office

 Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has named a new acting director of the Department of Social Services.

The governor announced Friday that Steve Corsi would take over the department.

A news release says Corsi currently serves as the director of the Wyoming Department of Family Services. He previously worked as a clinical director in several health care facilities and is currently an officer in the Army National Guard.

Corsi also spent nearly a decade in the Air Force and spent time as the CEO of High County Behavioral Health in Wyoming.

Commentary: Two Wacky Weeks

May 19, 2017

Remember Pope Benedict the Sixteenth?  I’ll return to him in a moment.

The news is so dynamic just now.  It’s like waiting for the next shoe to drop from a centipede – not when but how many?  The humorist Dorothy Parker had an appropriate phrase: “What fresh Hell is this?”  

Today Paul Pepper and JACK SCHULTZ, Director of the Bond Life Sciences Center, talk about a recent scientific study done at the University of Missouri that, once and for all, determines what some might consider obvious: dressing up when going out to dinner leads to better service. Why? It has to do with a common "fundamental attribution error." As usual, it's a fascinating conversation - watch! May 19, 2017

missouri house floor
File Photo / KBIA News

Missouri Democratic Rep. Randy Dunn says he will be resigning from the Missouri House, effective May 31.

Dunn announced in a Facebook post Thursday and on the floor of the House last week that he will not be returning to the Legislature next year.

A Facebook post on Dunn's page says that he will accept a job in Omaha, Nebraska, as the executive director of a community development organization.

Dunn represents the 23rd district in Kansas City and has served in the Missouri House since 2012.

Columbia Public Schools to Receive More State Funding

May 19, 2017
students in classroom
Rachel Rice / KBIA

Columbia Public Schools anticipates more funding from the state this year — but less from the federal government.

The district anticipates $400,000 in new revenue for next school year from state funding sources, including the Foundation Formula, the Classroom Trust Fund and transportation funding, Linda Quinley, the district's chief financial officer said. But she projected about $1 million less in federal funds.

Gulistan, Land of Roses

Many groups around the world are involved in the battle against the Islamic State.

But one group stands out: that’s a group of women guerrillas from the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, who are battling the extremist group in Syria and Iraq.

Their story is the subject of a new documentary called “Gulistan, Land of Roses,” by the Kurdish-Canadian filmmaker Zayne Akyol. The film won the Doc Alliance Selection Award at the Locarno International Film Festival in Switzerland and screened at the 2017 True/False Film Festival in Missouri.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg speaks with Akyol about the making of the film in Iraqi Kurdistan and the challenges faced by women soldiers in the Middle East.


University of Missouri

The University of Missouri announced Thursday the appointment of a new dean and vice chancellor of its agriculture college.

Christopher Daubert is set to take the reigns of MU’s College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, or CAFNR, on August 1. Previously, Daubert served as a professor and the department head of Food, Bioprocessing and Sciences at North Carolina State University.

University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine

The dean of the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine announced Wednesday he will be stepping down from his current position effective August 15, 2017.

Neil Olson has been the dean of the MU College of Veterinary Medicine since 2007. He said he feels his job at MU is “completed,” and he is leaving the college in better shape than he found it.

Olson will soon be starting a new position as the dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine at St. George’s University in St. George’s, Granada.  

He called this new position is an “opportunity of a lifetime”

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

The interim chancellor and provost at the University of Missouri says she is not a candidate to become permanent chancellor.

Chancellor and Provost Garnett Stokes, who took over May 3, 2017, said Tuesday the she expects the new chancellor to be named within the next two weeks. She said that she is not a candidate, but she did not say whether she had been interested or not. 

school buses
Twix / Flickr

Turmoil continues at a suburban St. Louis school where several students were suspended after walking out in support for union teachers.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that students stood with signs outside Hazelwood West High School before classes Wednesday to protest the five-day suspensions of their classmates.

Today Paul Pepper and KRISTEN EIFFERT talk about the next 'Kids in the Kitchen' event, happening this Saturday at the Daniel Boone Regional Library. Registration is encouraged - watch for details! At [2:35] CINDY MUSTARD and ED HANSON invite everyone to a special event at the historic Columbia Cemetery on Memorial Day. Local actors will be "bringing the cemetery alive" by way of 3-4 minute vignettes based on the person whose grave they stand. For instance, Ed will portray University of Missouri president John Lathrop. Other notables include 'Blind' Boone and Jane Froman. It really will be fun for the whole family! May 18, 2017

Seal of the State Auditor
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway says a law to allow more people to request criminal record expungements and raise application fees could violate the state Constitution.

Galloway warned Tuesday that a 2016 law could go over limits on lawmakers raising fees without a public vote.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri is asking Gov. Eric Greitens to bring state lawmakers back to the Capitol to pass legislation for a prescription drug monitoring program.

McCaskill said in a Wednesday letter to Greitens that he should call a special legislative session to enact a prescription database.

Public Questions Quality of Care, Future of Boone Hospital Center

May 18, 2017
fotos GOV/Baq / flickr

Boone County residents voiced both concern and optimism Wednesday night during a public meeting to discuss the future management of Boone Hospital Center, especially when considering a partnership between the hospital and MU Health Care.

About 40 Boone County residents spread out across many rows of blue seats at the Activity and Recreation Center to hear what the Boone Hospital Center Board of Trustees is considering for future management.

The Washington Post reports that President Donald Trump shared classified intelligence with a Russian envoy during a meeting in the Oval Office last week. The Trump administration denies the report – while the president is tweeted to the contrary. Where’s the truth? Also, the Chicago Tribune’s parent company makes a play for the Sun-Times, a Colorado law exposes journalists voting habits, and a story of modern-day slavery in the United States. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

City of Columbia Historic Preservation Commission

Next Tuesday, the City of Columbia's Historic Preservation Commission hosts its bi-annual Most Notable Properties event. Among the four properties being honored as notable is the long-time home of former Columbia mayor Darwin Hindman and his wife, Axie. The Hindmans and Historic Preservation Commission chairperson Pat Fowler were guests on this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud.

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