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Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

Chancellor Alexander Cartwright started work early last month at the University of Missouri as the first permanent chancellor since R. Bowen Loftin stepped down amid protests in November 2015. Chancellor Cartwright and the university have since announced a major initiative called the Missouri Land Grant Compact.

Adam Procter / flickr

University of Missouri Chancellor Alexander Cartwright held an event on Wednesday with members of the press to discuss his vision for the future. He addressed questions regarding the public perception of the University and challenges in hiring diverse faculty. Cartwright said he plans to revamp the image of the Columbia campus following a series of publicity setbacks.

A public defender is arguing to the Missouri Supreme Court that he shouldn't be suspended after neglecting indigent clients while he dealt with illness and a heavy caseload.

Public defender Karl Hinkebein's attorney instead argued to Missouri Supreme Court judges on Thursday that he should only be reprimanded because of those circumstances.

dicamba, cotton seeds,
Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

The herbicide dicamba is thought to have been the culprit in more than 3 million acres of damaged soybeans across the country, destroying plants and leaving farmers out millions of dollars in crops.

 

The chemical has been in use for decades, so why is it today apparently causing farms so much damage?

 

The answer is two-pronged, according to Kevin Bradley, a University of Missouri assistant professor and weed specialist who has studied the reported damage. Here’s what he says:

U.S. Dept. of Defense

Advances in technology have transformed modern armies.

But as robotics and artificial intelligence progress, so do the chances that militaries will be able to develop ‘killer robots’ to fight future wars.

In military jargon, these are known as autonomous weapons systems that may not only navigate and find targets without a human ‘pilot’ but also make the decision to use lethal force on their own.

This has spurred a lively ethical debate about whether and when computers may be entrusted with the decision to take a human life.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss the development of ‘killer robots’ and the debate about their use.


Today Paul Pepper visits with LIZ SENSINTAFFAR, Assoc. Dir. of Communications at Woodhaven, about the official kick-off to Direct Support Professionals Week (Sept. 11-15). The public is invited to attend an opening reception on September 12th, in which current DSPs will speak about why they love what they do! At [4:04] MELISSA HOLYOAK and DEBBIE FURNELL tell us about GenCOMO 2017, which is happening one month from today. Whether you're a beginner or a pro, if genealogy is of interest to you, you won't want to miss this family-friendly event! September 7, 2017

A taskforce appointed by Missouri's governor is recommending a professionally managed investment fund and a simplified tax code to help job growth in the state.

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens' Innovation Task Force on Wednesday announced those suggestions and dozens of other policy changes aimed at promoting new businesses, especially technology startups.

A taskforce appointed by Missouri's governor is recommending a professionally managed investment fund and a simplified tax code to help job growth in the state.

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens' Innovation Task Force on Wednesday announced those suggestions and dozens of other policy changes aimed at promoting new businesses, especially technology startups.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has appointed a former longtime Republican lawmaker to the state's Housing Development Commission.

Greitens on Wednesday announced he picked former lawmaker Jason Crowell to the post.

Crowell was elected to the Missouri House in 2000 and served as House majority floor leader. He then served eight years in the state Senate.

Crowell also made an unsuccessful bid for U.S. Congress in 2013 to replace resigned U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Emerson. He and eight other candidates lost to GOP Rep. Jason Smith.

Missouri Highway Patrol officials say a new system notifying the public when a police officer is injured or killed wasn't used in a recent shooting of two St. Louis officers.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the "Blue Alert" law allowing the agency to inform the public of suspect descriptions took effect Aug. 28, nearly a week before the officers were shot and injured in downtown St. Louis.

A Highway Patrol spokesman says the agency told the St. Louis Police Department about the suspect and left it to their discretion to issue an alert.

Drone Program Moves Forward in Randolph County

Sep 6, 2017

The Randolph County Sheriff’s Department has recently added a drone program to their department to greater benefit their emergency response and search and rescue cases.

Randolph County Sheriff Mark Nichols says they put in a request for the drone after a missing persons case in northern Missouri successfully used drone technology.

U.S. 54 Bridge Work begins in Callaway County

Sep 6, 2017
MoDOT Photos / Flickr

Updates to a bridge in Kingdom City began Tuesday. One lane will be closed on eastbound U.S. Route 54 over Interstate 70.

Missouri Department of Transportation Central District Area Manager Mike Schupp says that with condensed eastbound traffic, evening travelers are more likely to experience delays.

“I definitely expect it to slow down some in the evening hour,” said Schupp.

Schupp said that all on- and off-ramps to and from I-70 will remain open.

Plan for New Columbia Coffee Shop Moves Forward, Despite Concerns

Sep 6, 2017
Google Maps

 

Debate over a drive-thru Tuesday night didn't thwart a plan for a coffee shop on the corner of Forest Avenue and Providence Road.

The Columbia Missourian reports the Columbia City Council approved the rezoning of a plat on the corner of Providence Road and Forest Avenue, which will allow the current owners of Columbia Laundry to build a coffee shop with a drive-thru.

The plan drew some opposition from residents of the Ridgeway neighborhood who said it would cause increased westbound traffic on Forest Avenue.

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? Also, why the EPA called an AP report about Houston superfund sites yellow journalism, an ESPN commentator quits rather than call football games, and Tronc’s move to buy the New York Daily News. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Today Paul Pepper visits with NIKKI PYATT about the 3rd annual Berlin Bazaar, this Saturday at Cafe Berlin in Columbia! This family-friendly event features artists from all over Missouri; plus, food, music, storytelling and more! At [2:46] ADDISON MYERS and WIN GRACE invite everyone to "Memoirs," a one-act play about a conversation between Ulysses S. Grant and Mark Twain. Addison plays Grant, and Win provides the music! See it beginning this Friday at Talking Horse Productions in Columbia. September 6, 2017

via Flickr user Sarah_Ackerman

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? 

Adam B. Vary, BuzzFeed: “Why Hollywood bombed so badly this summer

St louis
paparutzi / Flickr

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger is urging the County Council to fire County Auditor Mark Tucker.

Stenger's office on Tuesday released a letter from Stenger to County Council Chairman Sam Page, citing a news report from last week that Tucker owes nearly $100,000 in federal taxes. Stenger also questioned why Tucker was hired in the first place, saying he had not previous accounting experience.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri's budget director says revenues increased 7 percent compared to the same time last fiscal year.

Budget Director Dan Haug on Tuesday announced the state collected about $792 million in the month of August compared to roughly $740 million in August 2016.

UM System Responds to Trump's Decision the End DACA

Sep 5, 2017
Sara Shahriari / KBIA

The University of Missouri System released a statement on Tuesday regarding the possible end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program or DACA.

This came after the Trump administration’s earlier announcement that they would be ending the program, which allows people who entered the US as children to live, work and study.

According to the statement, the system will work with the more than 35 students in the UM System that are DACA recipients to help them through this “time of uncertainty.”

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A Missouri mother has donated nearly eight gallons of breast milk to the victims of flooding in Texas.

KMOV-TV reports that Danielle Palmer, of Owensville, had a freezer full of milk because her youngest son, Truett, was born with a congenital heart defect and was unable to take her milk for much of his life. Most of his nutrition came through an IV.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The mayor of St. Louis says the city is "on edge" as it awaits a ruling in the first-degree murder trial of former police officer Jason Stockley, in part because of a troubled history of justice in St. Louis and nationwide.

Stockley is accused of fatally shooting Anthony Lamar Smith in 2011. The case was heard last month but it's unclear when Judge Timothy Wilson will rule.

Activists have threatened civil disobedience if Stockley, who is white, is acquitted in the death of the black suspect.

NEC Corporation of America / Education - Creative Commons License

A small private university in Missouri is creating a tuition-free college option for low-income students.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Fontbonne University is partnering with donors to create a program called the Fontbonne Promise.

Darrell Watts, left, has short hair and wears a red shirt. He stands in front of his sister Lisa Harrison, right, who has curly blonde hair and wears a pink shirt.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Darrell Watts and his sister Lisa Harrison both live in Audrain County. Darrell was born with cerebral palsy and is legally blind. Lisa is her brother’s guardian and also a Residential House Coordinator for Audrain Development Disability Services - where she works with other people with disabilities on a daily basis.

They spoke about how Darrell owning his own home has caused some healthcare struggles over the past few years.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Last week, our longtime KBIA colleague Pat Akers retired after 30 years of service to KBIA. Before he cruised off into the sunset, Pat sat down to reflect on the changes he has seen in radio during his KBIA career.

Commentary: Trump is Not a Republican

Sep 5, 2017

These commentaries are a team effort. I can’t thank KBIA staff enough for their production support: Ryan, Sarah, Nathan, Beatriz and Kyle by name. If you enjoyed the recent Beatles commentary, thank Kyle Felling.

 

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week in the woods, or backyard garden, you’ll likely cross paths with the monarch butterfly.

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