PM Newscasts
6:13 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Newscast for June 7, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Governor Nixon signs a law aiming to make college transfers easier
  • The flights between Columbia and Atlanta begin
  • Attempts to remedy that state education funding formula
  • Rural MO post offices get a reprieve

 

Business
6:05 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Some rural Mid-MO post offices get reprieve

Austin Fax KBIA

With rural postal offices across the nation closing down, three central Missouri offices have received relatively good news – they’ll remain open but with reduced hours.

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Global Journalist
6:00 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Tackling human trafficking

The child of a Cambodian prostitute stands in the doorway of a Phnom Penh slum shack as a group of sex workers play cards to pass the time.
David Longstreath AP Images

This week's Global Journalist panelists used vastly different methods to fight a modern version of slavery: the global sex trade.

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The Two-Way
5:53 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Issa To Holder: 'No, Mr. Attorney General You're Not A Good Witness'

Attorney General Eric Holder testifies during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Attorney General Eric Holder faced a grilling today during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing.

Rep. Darrell Issa was the main questioner, asking Holder if his Justice Department knew of the tactics used in the flawed gunrunning operation known as Fast and Furious.

NPR's Carrie Johnson reports Republicans also accused Holder of not coming clean and not complying with subpoenas. She sent this report to our Newscast unit about the four-hour long hearing:

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PM Newscasts
5:25 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Newscast for June 7, 2012

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Better breeding through cow genetics
  • Missouri's economy lagged nation's in 2011
  • eLearning discussed at UM Board of Curators orientation
The Two-Way
5:22 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

In Syria, Some Places 'Are Already Living The Civil War'

A Syrian boy sits in the rubble of house which was destroyed during a military operation by the Syrian pro-Assad army in April in the town of Taftanaz, Syria.
AP

NPR's Deborah Amos has been covering the uprising in Syria since it began more than a year ago. Like other foreign reporters, she has had to cover much of the conflict from afar because the Syrian government has only rarely granted visas. She has just returned to Syria for the first time since last fall and sent this dispatch:

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Science, Health and Technology
5:00 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

The sustainable hand

Dan Howell, a farmer-rancher in Marshall County, Kan., is experimenting with his land like an idealistic young farmer.
Jessica Naudziunas Harvest Public Media

The farmer of future will grow food and raise animals with tomorrow in mind. They’ll know contributing to the food supply is not enough. If the soil, air and water they use to produce food is damaged, good luck feeding anyone. 

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Music Reviews
4:54 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Music Review: 'Can You Canoe'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

For many kids, summer means no homework, playing outdoors and, of course, traveling. Our children's music reviewer, Stefan Shepherd, tells us about a new album inspired by a trip down America's original interstate highway.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CAN YOU CANOE?")

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It's All Politics
4:54 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

There's More Secret Money In Politics; Justice Kennedy Might Be Surprised

Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the Citizens United opinion saying that corporations can pay for ads expressly promoting or attacking political candidates.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 5:39 pm

Federal election law has required the public disclosure of campaign donors for nearly 40 years.

But this year, outside groups are playing a powerful role in the presidential election. And some of them disclose nothing about their donors. That's despite what the Supreme Court said in its controversial Citizens United ruling two years ago.

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Youth Radio
4:25 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Calif. School District Finds Gentler Path To Discipline

A gavel rests in a makeshift courtroom at Richmond High School in Richmond, Calif. The local school district has cut the number of student suspensions in half in six years by adopting a youth court program and other new discipline methods.
Robyn Gee

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 5:57 pm

Each school year, more than 700,000 California students — predominantly black and Latino — are suspended or expelled.

Robert, a talkative sixth-grader in the city of Richmond, has been suspended three times from his elementary school in the West Contra Costa Unified School District. If he gets suspended one more time, he says, he might get expelled. [NPR has withheld his last name because he is a minor.]

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