Abby Ivory-Ganja

Student Producer
Kristofor Husted/KBIA

Today, we’re bringing you United and Divided, a series of stories on bridging the urban-rural divide. It's reported by Harvest Public Media.

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election one thing is clear: rural America and urban America see things differently. In this series of profiles, Harvest Public Media reporters introduce us to our fellow Americans and examine the issues that they hold dear. We re-discover the ties that bind us and learn more about the lines that divide us. And through these voices, we come to know Americans just a little bit better.

Reporters from Missouri, Colorado, Iowa and Nebraska explore topics causing rift in the country, and how those differences define the future. They looked at schools, religion, immigration and trade policy. 


Courtesy Anton Treuer and Bemidji State University

November is Native American Heritage Month. This week author and professor of Ojibwe at Bemidji State University Anton Treuer talks with host Sara Shahriari. MU professor of digital storytelling and citizen of Cherokee Nation Joseph Erb joins in the wide-ranging conversation on language's role in maintaining a culture, Truer's book Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask, and the damage done by some mascots that mimic Native Americans. 


KBIA

Rural areas throughout the state, and areas around the country, are facing hospital and veterinary service closures. KBIA’s Abby Ivory-Ganja spoke the University of Missouri Professor of Food Animal Medicine and Surgery John Middleton about how the university’s College of Veterinary Medicine is working to incentivize students to work in rural areas.


Sara Shahriari/KBIA

This week on intersection we are joined by Dr. Rebecca Johnson. She is the Millsap Professor of Gerontological Nursing and Public Policy Professor at the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing. She's also a professor and serves as the director of the Research Center for Human Animal Interaction in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Johnson researches how people and pets interact, including the beneficial effects animals can have on people and the science behind it all.


Beatriz Costa-Lima / KBIA

Welcome Home is a transitional emergency and service center for veterans. The organization has been operating in Columbia for more than 25 years, and recently expanded. The mission? To reduce veteran homelessness by helping people gain housing, services and skills to form stable lives. 

Intersection's Sara Shahriari sat down with Timothy Rich, the executive director of Welcome Home, to learn about the organization and its new facilities.


Photo courtesy of T.J. Thomson

This week on Intersection we are joined by Jim Obergefell , who was the plaintiff in the landmark Supreme Court case that legalized same-sex marriage. Obergefell visited the University of Missouri earlier this month to present a lecture called “Love Wins” for a symposium on the Science of Love. Timothy Blair also joined the conversation. Blair is an alumnus of the Missouri School of Journalism, and in 2015 he donated $1 million to create the Timothy D. Blair Fund for LGBT Coverage in Journalism. 

Missouri Task Force One

Missouri Task Force One is an urban search and rescue team that responds to disasters around the country. There are just 28 such units nationwide, and the Missouri force is managed by the Boone County Fire Protection District. A Missouri Task Force One team recently returned to Columbia from Texas after helping with Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. 

Intersection's Sara Shahriari sat down with two members from the task force, Terry Cassil and Danny Mueller, to hear about their experiences. 


Benjamin Hoste

Lead has played a pivotal role in the history of Missouri. More than 17 million tons of lead have come out of the ground in the state over the last 300 years, and that's left a lasting impact on the state economically, environmentally and culturally. KBIA is exploring that history —and future—in our special series The Legacy of Lead.


Benjamin Hoste

Next week on Intersection, we look at Missouri's legacy of lead. In this preview of our upcoming show, Intersection host Sara Shahriari talks with photographer Benjamin Hoste about his images from Missouri's old lead belt. 

Hoste's photographs from the old lead belt are on display at the Greg Hardwick Gallery at Columbia College through September 27.

Sara Shahriari / KBIA

Intersection is marking the new school year with conversations with three MU professors whose work and teaching styles make then stand out. We learn that parts of Missouri were once on the coast of a huge inland sea, how a veterinarian and toxicologist gets to the bottom of mysterious ailments and how students are learning to understand the global market for fabrics. 


Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

In this special, hear from students at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. In a magazine writing class, they were challenged by their Professor Berkley Hudson to think of a formative experience and put it on the radio. 

They wrote about their families, their friends, and how cheap corndogs can lead to epiphanies. 

Listen to our radio special here: 

Or listen to them individually below:

Roommates usually spend a lot of time talking to each other, but for Liz Ramos, one conversation about arranged marriage took her by surprise. 

Shane Epping.

Peabody-winner Scott Carrier is a master of both personal and political radio. He talks about the importance of bearing witness, about telling difficult stories, spinning tales of human oddness, and about the reporter’s responsibility to challenge power structures. The interview took place in front a live audience in Columbia, Missouri (September 2016). Interviewer: Julija Šukys.

You can hear Scott Carrier’s work at http://homebrave.com/

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

In this special, hear from eight students at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. They've learned both inside and outside the classroom, so they were challenged in their magazine writing capstone class to take an experience and share it on the radio. With help from their Associate Professor Berkley Hudson, they recount stories about family, roommates and rats. 

Listen to our radio special here: