Abigail Keel

Student Reporter/Producer

Abigail Keel is a senior student at the Missouri School of Journalism. She is originally from St. Louis, Missouri and grew up hating the drone of public radio in her parent's car. In high school, she had a job picking up trash in a park where she listened to podcasts for entertainment and made a permanent switch to public-radio lover. She's volunteered and interned for Third Coast International Audio Festival in Chicago, IL, and worked on the KBIA shows Faith and Values, Intersection and CoMO Explained. 

Sara Shahriari / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map. And to hear your favorite stories from last season, you can find our free podcast on itunes.


State Representative Kip Kendrick said he sees school-based telehealth as a way to bridge the gap between rural youth and access to quality medical care.

pills
Pink Sherbert Photography / Flickr

Columbia area legislators agree that youth drug use could be stemmed by establishing a better way to track adult drug users.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

State Representatives from the Columbia area said they may be divided on some details, but for education, they cross the aisle.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

  Columbia City Council voted Monday night to approve new lighting features for Stephen’s Lake Park.

The Planned Parenthood Center in Columbia has announced it will resume medically induced abortions at its local clinic.

Abigail Keel / KBIA

Eric Greitens is technically a prospective candidate for Governor of Missouri, but his campaign stickers announcing “Greitens for Governor,” and his 3-month tour of the state show he is pretty serious.

Abigail Keel / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map. And to hear your favorite stories from last season, you can find our free podcast on itunes.

Jefferson City Public Schools

  The Jefferson City Public School system is under new leadership. On July 1st, Larry Linthacum began as superintendent of the district. He was appointed to replace former superintendent Brian Mitchell with a unanimous vote by the school board last December.

Abigail Keel / KBIA

The fate of what many Boone County residents know as the fairgrounds is up in the air. The Central Missouri Events Center Review Board Committee met Wednesday for the first time at the grounds to begin plans for the future of the county-owned space.

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map. And to hear your favorite stories from this season, you can find our free podcast on itunes.


Abigail Keel / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map

  


Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map

  

  

Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map

    

Abigail Keel / KBIA

The most contentious part of a building a new school is shifting attendance boundary lines. Some families get to stay, others switch schools, leave friends, and if they’re lucky, get a shorter commute.

Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map


Columbia Public Schools

Columbia Public Schools Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education Ben Tilley began his presentation to the Columbia Public Schools Board of Education with a little physics. Every action the board makes in drawing boundary lines, he said, with have an equal, but opposite, reaction.

Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning, etc. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map


Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning, etc. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map


Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning, etc. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map

This is an edited version of KBIA's Heartland, Missouri, for consideration for awards submission. For the full version, follow this link: http://kbia.org/post/heartland-missouri

Kathryn Fishman Weaver

This I believe. These are iconic words we heard on National Public Radio from the mouths of hundreds of people, sharing their beliefs, thoughts, and guiding principles. Today KBIA brings you a series of This I Believe, written and recorded by Rock Bridge High School students.


Jack Howard / KBIA

We've all been there. Driving downtown during a high traffic time. Maybe on 9th Street. Listening to KBIA. 

And then--stopped. There's a semi truck stopped in the lane up ahead. 

Jack Howard / KBIA

One way CoMO Explained chooses topics for our episodes is from listener questions. Way back in our first iteration of the show a listener posted on Reddit and asked us why KBIA, an NPR station, plays so much classical music.

This episode is for that Reddit listener.


For the past year, KBIA has been working on a special long-form story about a place in Northeast Missouri called Heartland. It’s a story with threads of religion, law, business, and morality that all end in a knot, in the middle of a cornfield.

    


cogdogblog / Flickr

If you’re a student at Mizzou, you were probably hooked to this story just by mentioning MizzouWireless. But if you’re not, then what you may need a little filling in.

Note: We received several requests for a more technical explanation of what may be causing the issues users experience. Please see the bottom of this story for an update.

Columbia Daily Tribune

Sales tax. Not a great opening line for journalists trying to educate people about how a city functions. The moment sales tax is mentioned eyes glaze over, something else suddenly becomes important, and we all casually scroll through twitter on our phones.

But sales tax is actually a really fascinating topic, especially right now in our city and country’s history. To learn why, we have to go back…way back, to 1970.

MU Archives

Peace Park is that grassy little knoll along the north edge of MU’s campus. It’s at the corner of 8th and Elm, a stone’s throw away from the columns. There’s a creek (or drainage ditch) that saunters through it, creating a calm and tranquil vibe for the meditators and hammock dwellers.    

    

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom including:

  • Missouri Supreme Court cancels an execution and schedules a new one
  • Amendment 7 failed perhaps because of its placement on the August ballot
  • USDA predicts a record crop for Midwest farmers
  • Missouri will receive part of a $35 million settlement with Pfizer

Regional coverage from the KBIA newsroom including:

  • City Council approves OPUS building plans for downtown development on Locust
  • Meat prices rise while other food prices stabilize
  • Brady Deaton will receive Missourian Award
  • Boone County primary race has interesting twist

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