Alex Heuer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is a producer of St. Louis on the Air. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Ill. and worked for a time at Iowa Public Radio.

Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in social studies. In 2016, he earned a Master of Public Policy Administration with a focus in nonprofit organization management and leadership from University of Missouri-St. Louis. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

The Pony Express is an enduring icon of the American West. It was a venture that used horseback riders to transport mail halfway across the continent from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento, California.

“This book had to be one of the ones that I had the most fun with,” explained Jim DeFelice, author of “West Like Lightning: The Brief, Legendary Ride of the Pony Express."

By day Jerod Broadbooks is a student-athlete at Lindenwood University. He studies music education and is on the track team. On Monday night, however, Broadbooks, who is also a guitarist, got the chance of a lifetime to perform onstage at Hollywood Casino Amphitheater with the rock band 30 Seconds to Mars.

Broadbooks said the experience started when he heard an advertisement on 105.7 The Point while at his summer job as a lifeguard in Wildwood.

It’s well known that people eat different foods in different parts of the United States.

The culture and history of one of those areas – the American South – is explored in a new book by St. Louis native Joe Johnston. He’s the author of “Grits to Glory: How Southern Cookin’ Got So Good.”

President Trump on Monday evening chose Brett Kavanaugh to fill the U.S. Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kavanaugh will now go before the U.S. Senate for confirmation.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Greg Magarian, J.D., professor of law at Washington University, about the nomination and its local implications. Magarian previously clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

In 2014, the state of Michigan switched the city of Flint’s water supply from Lake Huron to the Flint River. After the switch residents began complaining about the water but government officials claimed it was safe to drink.

Timothy O’Leary, general director of Opera Theatre of St. Louis, is concluding a 10 year run in St. Louis as head of the city’s premier opera theater company.

“I’m getting very nostalgic about St. Louis and how much I love it here,” O’Leary told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Tuesday.

O’Leary is heading east to lead the Washington National Opera, an organization that’s part of the Kennedy Center and that enjoys more than twice the budget of OTSL.

The recollection of near-daily, hour-long van rides from Bourbon, Missouri, to St. Louis and back is etched in Taylor Louderman’s memory. Also present is the memory of her younger twin sisters screaming in the back of the Toyota Sienna because the sun was in their eyes.

“My family and I, my family mostly, had to make a lot of sacrifices for my career, and I felt like we were all able to celebrate together,” Louderman said just prior to a recent rehearsal for this year’s Tony Awards that are Sunday night.

Oral storytelling is an age-old tradition that the Missouri Historical Society is making the most of when it comes to sharing veterans’ personal experiences. While construction is finishing up downtown at Soldiers Memorial Military Museum, an oral-history project is currently underway that will soon highlight the detailed accounts of 30 veterans from the St. Louis area.

For the month of Ramadan, Muslims in St. Louis and across the world are counting down the days left of the holy month marked by daily fasting, increased religious observance and self-reflection.

But also added in the practice is refraining from smoking, bad behavior, such as cursing, gossiping or fighting, and impure thoughts. It’s a time for people to reflect on their habits and rekindle a practicing relationship with God, as well as build self-discipline.

A diverse group of people were once parishioners under the ministry of Father Augustus Tolton in Quincy, Illinois, during the late 19th century. That is until the African-American priest was advised to get out of town. Tolton, who would eventually return to be buried in Quincy, suffered much controversy and isolation in his day.

“Through it all, he kept open arms for everyone, white or black,” Joseph Perry, auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Chicago, said during St. Louis on the Air, “and was kind of mistreated because of that openness and accused of creating a situation of integration that society and the church was not ready for.”

The tragedy of star-crossed lovers Romeo and Juliet is a timeless tale and one of English playwright William Shakespeare’s most popular works.

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis is bringing the classic play back to Forest Park June 1 to 24.

Temple Grandin is an accomplished scientist, inventor and author. She is also an expert in autism research and is one of the most well-known adults with autism.

“I want to get kids interested in making things,” Grandin told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday.

Defense attorneys for Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens say an examination of his phone has turned up no evidence of the photo at the center of his felony invasion of privacy trial.

Greitens is accused of taking a partially nude and nonconsensual photo of a woman with whom he was having an affair.

Public nuisance laws are one tool that city governments use to expel residents who are deemed a problem by city officials. Some housing advocates say officials in Maplewood are using these laws against poor people, people of color and victims of domestic abuse.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Tuesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will talk with Benjamin Hochman, author of “The Big 50: St. Louis Cardinals.”

St. Louis has long been known as a hub for the use and development of biotechnology. Gaining steam, however, is the activity surrounding artificial intelligence (AI).

There’s debate about some of the stories associated with the international event that had St. Louis buzzing more than a century ago, such as whether the 1904 World’s Fair was really the point at which ice cream and other treats were invented.

But one thing that historians do know for sure about the seven-month-long spectacle is that it was marked by blatant racism.

Largely absent from the canon of American literature are the experiences of African-Americans who live in economically disadvantaged regions of the country and who experience the last effects of segregation.

In her 2017 novel, “No One is Coming to Save Us,” Stephanie Powell Watts focuses on an extended African-American family and sets her story in a rural North Carolina town that has seen its furniture manufacturing largely evaporate.

We Live Here, the national-award winning podcast about race and class from St. Louis Public Radio and PRX, debuted its fourth season Thursday.  

For more than 30 years, Circus Flora, a one-ring circus that makes St. Louis its home, has offered a circus show that’s best described as live theater. It’s an intimate setting that is in stark contrast to the images some people might conjure of the large Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus which performed for the last time 10 months ago.

Two things are significantly different about this year’s Circus Flora season.

Missouri native Melissa Scholes Young has fond memories of growing up in Hannibal.

On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air, we aired host Don Marsh's conversation with St. Louis-based journalist and author Sarah Kendzior that was recorded April 17 at Left Bank Books.

The number of opioid-related deaths in the St. Louis region is poised to once again break a record.

Opioid-related deaths include overdoses on prescription painkillers, heroin and, increasingly, fentanyl - a prescription drug more potent than heroin that is often mixed with other substances.

A treasure trove of invaluable artifacts from the space race will be on display at the St. Louis Science Center.

“Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission,” a traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, opens Saturday in St. Louis.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with our partners from Sauce Magazine about the best new restaurants to try during the month of April.

Joining him for the discussion were Catherine Klene and Matt Sorrell, managing editor and staff writer, respectively.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed what you need to know in advance of filing state and federal tax returns that must be postmarked by April 17.

“I am tough and I am thorough,” explained Nicole Galloway, Missouri’s state auditor.

Galloway, who joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday, detailed what her job entails, explained her ongoing audit of the City of St. Louis and addressed the mood in Jefferson City as Gov. Eric Greitens’ felony invasion of privacy trial is set to get underway May 14.

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