Alex Heuer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is a producer of St. Louis on the Air. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Ill. and worked for a time at Iowa Public Radio.

Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in social studies. In 2016, he earned a Master of Public Policy Administration with a focus in nonprofit organization management and leadership from University of Missouri-St. Louis. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

If you happened to be in the Delmar Loop on Wednesday or in a number of other places in the St. Louis area, it’s likely you heard live music.

Those sounds were part of Make Music Day, an international holiday that’s celebrated in more than 750 cities worldwide including more than 50 in the United States. 

Opera singers Nika Leoni and Kathy Favazza are co-founders of the event in St. Louis.

Archaeologists from the Missouri Department of Transportation believe they have found artifacts and evidence of permanent residences in St. Louis prior to 1764, when the city became a permanent trading post along the Mississippi River.

The discoveries and inferences that archaeologists can derive from them add nuance to the complex story of how St. Louis became an important commerce center in the 18th century – more than a decade prior to United States’ independence and nearly 40 years before the country acquired St. Louis through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

The 10th annual Spring to Dance Festival gets underway Friday night at the Touhill Performing Arts Center at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Featured among the 30 professional dance companies is Collage Dance Collective, a Memphis-based company.

The question of whether a Confederate monument in Forest Park should be removed was explored on our weekly Behind the Headlines segment amid the controversy surrounding it.

After a nearly 150 year run, the famed Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus performed its final show on Sunday in New York.

Here in St. Louis, circus performers were watching a live video stream of the event in a tent of their own.

“It was wonderfully heartfelt, some of the things the performers said, especially about the role of animals in people’s lives,” said Cecil MacKinnon, Circus Flora’s theater director, who joined St. Louis on the Air contributor Steve Potter on Thursday.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, Egyptologist Bob Brier joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss a new exhibit opening at the Saint Louis Science Center.

The exhibit puts guests in the shoes of archeologist Howard Carter when he discovers King Tutankhamun tomb and features recreations of many other artifacts.

“The Discovery of King Tut” opens May 27 and runs through January 7.

Earlier this week, the St. Louis dining scene was lauded with two more feathers in its cap: the James Beard Foundation awarded Sidney Street Café’s chef/owner Kevin Nashan with the coveted Best Chef: Midwest award and Gioia’s Deli was heralded with an America’s Classic award.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Nashan and Alex Donley, the co-owner of Gioia’s Deli on the Hill, alongside Sauce Magazine’s Catherine Klene, joined host Don Marsh to discuss the awards, their impact on the St. Louis dining scene and upcoming restaurants to keep an eye out for.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed research about the role fines, court fees, surcharges and more play in the criminal justice system. The issue gained prominence in the St. Louis area after Michael Brown’s shooting death in 2014.

It is well documented that playwright Tennessee Williams did not look kindly on his childhood spent in St. Louis, Missouri. Born in Mississippi into a “bucolic atmosphere” near his grandparents, the author of “The Glass Menagerie” and “A Streetcar Named Desire” was uprooted at age eight when his alcoholic father was transferred to International Shoe Company in St. Louis.

Fadi BouKaram, a photographer from the Middle Eastern country of Lebanon, is on a mission in the United States. He’s attempting to visit all of the 40-plus communities in the U.S. that share the name of his homeland.

He acquired an RV and began the five-month trip on Oct. 15, 2016. The first Lebanon he visited in the United States was in Oregon.

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A building that used to house machines making barber chairs and, later, hats, will someday soon house a variety of small to mid-sized manufacturers looking to “scale up.” The building, located at 2528 Texas Ave. in the Fox Park neighborhood, will contain about 87,000-square-feet of manufacturing space and will be known as Brick City Makes.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard reaction to what Gov. Eric Greitens said in his first State of the State address.

Joining host Don Marsh were St. Louis Public Radio reporters Jason Rosenbaum and Marshall Griffin, as well as Dave Robertson, chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

The relationship between the United States and China is important, as demonstrated by recent meetings between President Barack Obama and his counterpart, Xi Jinping.

A group of 37 Chinese students will begin arriving in St. Louis this week to attend Missouri Boys and Girls State, youth leadership programs held at the University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg.