Associated Press

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
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Missouri senators won't reconvene until at least after the July 4 holiday to consider legislation on abortion.

Republican Majority Leader Mike Kehoe on Tuesday announced the next Senate meeting is scheduled for July 6. But he said that's a technical session and no work will be done.

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens called lawmakers back to the Capitol for the second time this summer to work on abortion policy.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri members of the NAACP and others are rallying against legislation to make it more difficult to sue for discrimination.

Roughly 40 people protested Tuesday at the Capitol and taped opposition notes outside Gov. Eric Greitens' office. The bill is pending on Greitens' desk. The Republican governor has not said if he'll allow the bill to become law or veto it.

In part because of the bill, the state NAACP issued an advisory telling travelers to be careful while in the state because of a danger that civil rights won't be respected.

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

The Missouri Supreme Court says it's constitutional to commit sex offenders to secure confinement after prison.

In two rulings Tuesday, the high court supported the Missouri law, which allows sexually violent offenders to be committed indefinitely to mental institutions.

A man convicted of sodomy and a man convicted of rape challenged their commitments and the constitutionality of the law.

Illinois lawmakers are looking at a Democrat-pushed budget plan that would raise income taxes and make steep spending cuts as a way to end the budget impasse.

Already, the state has been without a spending plan for two years, and the next fiscal year begins Saturday.

Sarah E. Lupescu / Missouri National Guard

The Missouri NAACP is issuing an advisory telling travelers to be careful while in the state because of a danger that civil rights won't be respected.

The advisory cites a bill passed by lawmakers and awaiting action by Gov. Eric Greitens that would make it more difficult to sue for housing or employment discrimination.

State chapter President Rod Chapel said Monday that the organization is considering a full boycott of the state. The NAACP in February launched an economic boycott in North Carolina.

Chris Yunker / Flickr

The University of Missouri Libraries is asking book lovers for some help.

Library officials have a wish list of more than 400 books that they hoped to buy but are not able to because of budget cuts.

Klaw101.com

The number of Missouri House races lacking major-party opposition has been on the rise.

An analysis by The Associated Press of last fall's elections found that 60 percent of Missouri House races lacked a Republican or Democratic candidate — ranking in the top tier of states nationally.

Mizzou Columns
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The University of Missouri's Board of Curators has voted unanimously to revoke an honorary degree it granted to Bill Cosby.

University system President Mun Choi recommended that the board strip the comedian of a doctorate in humane letters he received in 1999. Choi cited allegations from several women that Cosby sexually assaulted them. Choi says Cosby's actions do not reflect the university's values.

File photo / KBIA

Missouri Republican Gov. Eric Greitens says he prefers a ramped-up House version of a bill to tighten state abortion laws

Greitens told reporters Thursday in Jefferson City that he supports the latest House iteration, which has more stringent restrictions than what senators had initially approved.

David Shane / Flickr

A Missouri circuit judge says Republican Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft's office wrote a confusing and grammatically incorrect summary of a referendum to repeal right to work.

A summary is meant to help voters understand ballot measures. But Cole County Circuit Court Judge Daniel Green on Thursday ruled the right-to-work summary could confuse voters.

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

A lawmaker says Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens will sign his bill to ban people convicted of sex offenses against children from coming within 500 feet of children's museums.

Cassville Republican Sen. David Sater said Wednesday that he's meeting with Greitens for a bill signing in Jefferson City Thursday.

Mizzou Columns
David Chicopham / Flickr

University of Missouri System President Mun Choi wants the university to rescind an honorary degree given to Bill Cosby nearly 20 years ago.

The system's Board of Curators will vote Friday on Choi's recommendation. A university staff memo sent to the curators says sexual assault allegations against Cosby are "incompatible" with the honorary doctorate in humane letters given to him in 1999.

Doug Kerr / Flickr

A federal judge in St. Louis is set to hear an update on the progress Ferguson, Missouri, has made in its agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice.

The St. Louis suburb has been under scrutiny since the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014. Brown, who was black and unarmed, was fatally shot by white Ferguson officer Darren Wilson during a street confrontation, leading to months of unrest.

Jason Rojas / Flickr

Aspiring Missouri college police officers will face the same training as other future cops under a bill signed by the governor.

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens on Tuesday signed the legislation. Current law calls for at least 320 hours of training for college police compared to at least 470 hours for most other aspiring officers.

The bill also will give community college police officers the ability to enforce traffic rules, such as speed limits, on campus. Only university police now have that authority.

The legislation takes effect Aug. 28.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri Democratic Auditor Nicole Galloway says the state could face a $3 billion loss from tax credits over the next 15 years.

A new report released Wednesday by Galloway's office says that's how much lawmakers have authorized for tax credits that have not yet been redeemed.

The auditor's office says the state has faced $5.4 billion in revenue losses from tax credits over the past decade.

Galloway says policymakers should consider the impact tax credits have on the budget.

File / flickr

State versus state battle lines are being drawn across the Mississippi River, with a top Missouri official urging Illinois regulators to back away from a plan that would allow higher levees, potentially worsening flooding on the Missouri side of the river.

Bird's Point in New Madrid
File Photo / KBIA

Another small earthquake has rattled parts of southeast Missouri along the New Madrid fault.

The U.S. Geological Survey's Earthquakes Hazards Program says the earthquake with a magnitude of 2.7 rumbled at 4:26 a.m. Monday, centered near the small town of Steele in the Missouri Bootheel region. There were no immediate reports of injury or damage.

The New Madrid fault produced earthquakes in 1811 and 1812 that could be felt as far away as New England. Some experts believe it's just a matter of time before another serious quake along the fault line.

KBIA

The University of Missouri plans to encourage more people to adopt research animals.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports the university announced Thursday it will work with Homes for Animal Heroes, a program developed by the National Animal Interest Alliance.

The move comes as a group called Animal Rescue Media Education is suing the university for documents on the 179 dogs and cats used in research. The Missouri system has demanded more than $82,000 to locate and copy records for the Beagle Freedom Project organization.

Eric Greitens
Dave Ingraham / Flickr

Missouri lawmakers' frustrations with Republican Gov. Eric Greitens are boiling over.

State lawmakers are using a special session on abortion called by the governor as an opportunity to publicly slam Greitens.

During his campaign and since his January inauguration, Greitens has repeatedly criticized lawmakers as "career politicians."

Springfield Republican Sen. Bob Dixon says that rhetoric has "poisoned the well" and led to a strained relationship between the governor and legislators.

Illinois legislators will come back to Springfield for a special session in order to work out a budget deal, Gov. Bruce Rauner said Thursday in an attempt to end an impasse that's approaching its third year and running up the state's deficit. 

The Republican governor's announcement, done via a Facebook video and statement, came the same day that the multi-state lottery association overseeing Powerball and Mega Millions games will leave Illinois by the end of this month if there is no budget. 

david_shane / Flickr

Pro-abortion rights supporters are rallying at the Missouri Capitol in opposition to Republican proposals to further regulate the procedure.

Roughly 200 people gathered in the Rotunda on Wednesday as the Republican-led Senate prepared to take up legislation that would, among other things, require annual inspections for abortion clinics and nullify a St. Louis ordinance prohibiting discrimination in hiring or housing based on reproductive decisions.

ALEX HEUER / St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri Senate leader says a bipartisan call to investigate the Republican governor won't advance during an ongoing special session.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Mike Kehoe said Wednesday that his ethics committee won't have a hearing on the proposal because the focus of the special session is abortion.

Two Democrats and four Republicans are calling for a legislative investigation of Gov. Eric Greitens.

Updated at 8:10 p.m. with how much it'll cost to switch to a REAL ID license — Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens signed a bill Monday aimed at averting a scenario in which Missouri residents could have been turned away at airports starting in January for lack of valid identification.

The legislation will give residents the option to get driver's licenses or other identification cards that comply with the federal REAL ID Act. Compliance with the tougher proof-of-identity requirements is necessary at airports, some federal facilities and military bases.

Katherine Johnson / flickr

  Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has signed a bill aimed at averting a scenario in which Missouri residents could have been turned away at airports for lack of valid identification.

The legislation signed Monday will give residents the option to get driver's licenses or other identification cards that comply with the federal Real ID Act.

Compliance with the tougher proof-of-identity requirements is necessary at airports, some federal facilities and military bases. The federal government has said Missouri licenses won't be valid at airports in 2018 if they're not compliant.

Paul Sableman / flick

  Missouri is being sued over allegations of inappropriately providing psychotropic drugs to foster care children.

Two national child advocacy groups and Saint Louis University School of Law Legal Clinics filed the federal lawsuit Monday against the state Department of Social Services on behalf of several children currently or formerly in foster care.

The legal clinic, National Center for Youth Law and the organization Children's Rights say this is the first class-action lawsuit that focuses only on psychotropic drugs given to foster children.

 Lincoln University will operate next fiscal year with a budget that is $3 million less than last year and includes 48 position losses.

The Board of Curators on Thursday approved a budget of $33.5 million for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

A portion of a 38-foot-tall granite monument to the Confederacy in St. Louis has been removed, but a spokesman for the mayor's office says the bulk of the memorial may remain in place for weeks.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The city of Springfield, Missouri, is moving closer to starting a local prescription drug monitoring program.

The Springfield News-Leader reports that a City Council committee decided Tuesday to let the full council vote on a bill that would create the program. The ordinance would add the city to a group of more than two dozen jurisdictions in Missouri that have decided to take control without the help of the state.

Missouri is currently the only place in the country without statewide prescription drug tracking.

TurneJ1 via Wikipedia

Supporters of a new osteopathic medical school in Joplin are looking forward to late July, when the first class of 162 students is scheduled to arrive.

The Joplin campus of the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences officially opened with a ribbon cutting ceremony Tuesday. It is the first medical school to open in Missouri in nearly a half century.

University Village Apartments
Miranda Metheny / KBIA

The University of Missouri will pay $750,000 to settle claims filed after a Columbia firefighter died in a walkway collapse at a university apartment complex.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that the settlement finalized Monday comes in a lawsuit filed by the widow of Lt. Bruce Britt. The suit alleged that the university didn't properly maintain the University Village Apartments, where Britt died in February 2014 while evacuating residents. The apartments have since been torn down.

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