Austin Federa

Content Director

Austin Federa serves as KBIA's Content Director. He is a graduate of Lawrence University and holds a degree in Political Science, and Environmental Studies. He comes to KBIA from Boston, following work with NPR's On Point, You're The Expert, and the American Repertory Theater. He is an experienced show producer, audio engineer, and digital media strategist. 

 

Ways To Connect

  A New York City high school student makes $72 million playing the stock market? The headline offered the promise of a story that was almost too good to be true. Turns out the teen, Mohammed Islam, made up the whole story. It joins an increasingly long list of prominent stories unraveling due to fact checking.  Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

via Flickr user Bob Mical

  

Rolling Stone has issued an apology for its November story, "A rape on campus: A brutal assault and struggle for justice at UVA," saying that the magazine didn't do enough in verifying an unidentified student's account of sexual assault. Was Sabrina Rubin Erdely's reporting flawed? Why didn't she interview the accused? What did the fact-checking look like on that article?  And, why did Rolling Stone quietly change its apology, removing the statement the magazine "misplaced" its trust in "Jackie?” 

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.

 

For more, follow Views of the News on FacebookTwitter, and YouTube.

Demonstrators protest in front of the White House in support of Net Neutrality
Joseph Gruber / Flickr

In the late '90s when most around the world were still waking up to the internet, the Department of Justice and Microsoft were preparing to go head-to-head in a case many thought would define the future of software and digital commerce. Today’s net neutrality debate stands to have a similar impact, but will technical compliance regulations really deliver the equal access proponents insist it will?


Obesity is the number one public health issue in Missouri – it affects more than 30% of adults and nearly one in seven children between the ages of ten and seventeen.

Obesity is the number one public health issue in Missouri – it affects more than 30% of adults and nearly one in seven children between the ages of ten and seventeen. But in order to solve the problem of obesity in Missouri, we need to first understand why it exists. Intersection host Ryan Famuliner will lead the discussion of some of the physical, cultural, and even political events that have brought on what is considered by many to be a public health crisis in our state. 

Join us this Tuesday at 7pm for “Missouri: State of Obesity,” a live taping of KBIA’s talk show Intersection. 

Jack Howard / KBIA

One way CoMO Explained chooses topics for our episodes is from listener questions. Way back in our first iteration of the show a listener posted on Reddit and asked us why KBIA, an NPR station, plays so much classical music.

This episode is for that Reddit listener.


  KBIA and the University of Missouri announced plans to buy KWWC.  The lower-power FM station is currently owned by Stephens College.  Pending FCC approval, the new frequency will carry classical music around the clock while KBIA will switch to an all-news format from 4 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the purchase.

Jack Howard / KBIA

On November 4 KBIA reporters crossed mid-Missouri in search of candidates, supporters, and opponents on Tuesday. We've compiled a slideshow of their photos on the ground. 

Join KBIA for our live coverage of the midterm elections this evening. We'll update this live blog throughout the evening, and live on-air at 7pm.

[View the story "Missouri midterm Elections, 2014" on Storify]

CitizenFour

Laura Poitras' documentary, CitizenFour, will screen in Columbian, Mo. on Sunday in conjunction with True/False. The film documents NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden's meetings with journalists from the Guardian in a Hong Kong hotel room. Early reviews of the film are strong, and already there's Oscar talk buzzing around it.​ Could this film change public perception? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss. 

9 Myths about MizzouWireless

Oct 16, 2014
cogdogblog / Flickr

If you’re a student at Mizzou, you were probably hooked to this story just by mentioning MizzouWireless. But if you’re not, then what you may need a little filling in.

Note: We received several requests for a more technical explanation of what may be causing the issues users experience. Please see the bottom of this story for an update.

A group of minority journalists are fighting to bring more diversity to American newsrooms, journalism conferences, panels and classrooms. The Journalism Diversity Project is designed to make it easy for hiring managers and event organizers to find qualified experts who are journalists of color. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss. 

Cherie Cullen / Department of Defense

The rumors swirled for much of last week, after an exclusive Politico report, that David Gregory was out at Meet the Press. NBC made it official on Thursday. Chuck Todd will take over as moderator of the program on September 7. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss. 

freejamesfoley.org

The militant Jihadist group ISIS released video of the beheading of journalist James Foley in retaliation, it says, for the U.S. air strikes in Iraq. Foley went missing on Thanksgiving day, 2012, in Syria. In the video Foley is kneeling against a desert landscape, wearing something resembling an orange prison jump suit.  ISIS is threatening to kill another journalist they are holding if air strikes do not stop. Has the role journalists play in war zones changed? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry, and Amy Simons discuss. 

Austin Federa / KBIA

As demonstrations continue in Ferguson Missouri in response to the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown, youth in the community are grappling with what is happening in their community. A team of KBIA reporters on Thursday went to the apartment complex where Brown was shot five days earlier to have conversations with young people about the past and future of their town.

Christian County official ballot

The August 5, 2014 primary election ballot includes five proposals for amendments to the Missouri constitution. Amendment 1, commonly referred to as the 'Right to Farm' amendment, would add a section 35 to Article I of the state constitution.

 

Have you ever left a doctor’s office with more questions than answers? Don’t let that happen again. 

Join us Thursday, July 24th for an evening of conversation with health literacy experts Dr. Steve Pu and Dr. Ingrid Taylor of Health Literacy Missouri. Come take part in a live taping of KBIA’s local talk show Intersection, hosted by Ryan Famuliner.

Jeff Hoelscher speaks with Rick Baker, a flight paramedic with University Hospital’s Staff for Life Helicopter Service, discusses medical relief work and his upcoming mission to a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan.

@Bowtiger

Last week Chancellor Loftin joined us on Intersection for a big-think conversation on his vision for MU, a fiscal path forwards, and steps the University is taking to keep students safe. His professional qualifications were readily known when he arrived on campus, but what much of MU was not expecting was a quirky and engaging Twitter aficionado. As the semester winds to a close, KBIA's Andrew Gibson compiled some of the Chancellor's finest Twitter moments. 

R Bowen Loftin took over as the Chancellor of the University of Missouri three months ago now, taking the reins from Brady Deaton, who had served as Chancellor for a decade. Now that Dr. Loftin has had time to settle in Columbia, today on Intersection we’ll talk about what he’s learned about MU since he’s been here, and what his plans are for the University’s future.

Columbia’s city clerk has until Tuesday evening to decide whether the petition known as Repeal 6214 has enough signatures and is valid - and whether the city can continue with its plans, approved last March, with the developer the Opus Group. If you’ve been following this story, you know that this is about another student housing complex planned for downtown Columbia. Those in favor of the plan - including the mayor and a majority of city council members - say increasing the housing opportunities and investment downtown is a good thing.

On April 22nd the Radio Television Digital News Association announced the 2014 recipients of the prestigious Edward R. Murrow regional awards. The RTDNA's announcement says "the awards recognize the best electronic journalism produced by radio, television and online news organizations around the world."

"RTDNA is proud to be able to honor the best of local broadcast and digital journalism with these prestigious awards while honoring the legacy of Edward R. Murrow." RTDNA Chairman Chris Carl  

It’s a new era for Columbia Public Schools...

Journalists often find themselves at risk while on the job — covering wars, hurricanes, fires… when is going into harm’s way an act of bravery? When should a reporter retreat for their own safety? Also the coverage of secret social media networks in Cuba, the ouster of Mozila CTO Brendan Eich and using regional broadcasters during the Final Four. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Since the day Dorial Green-Beckham committed to play for Missouri’s football team on Feb. 1, 2012 MU students have chanted “DGB! DGB! DGB!”

Those chants will not be heard at Faurot Field anymore.

On April 8th KBIA's news team was with local election candidates, capturing triumph, defeat, and a proposal. 

Join us for KBIA's live election coverage. Check back for the latest as Mid-Mo heads to the polls. 

9:01pm With 7/7 precincts reporting  it looks to be Ginny Chadwick  Ward 1 for Columbia City Council