Evie Hemphill

Evie Hemphill joined the St. Louis on the Air team in February 2018. After earning a bachelor’s degree in English literature in 2005, she started her career as a reporter for the Westminster Window in Colorado. Several years later she went on to pursue graduate work in creative writing at the University of Wyoming and moved to St. Louis upon earning an MFA in the spring of 2010. She worked as writer and editor for Washington University Libraries until 2014 and then spent several more years in public relations for the University of Missouri–St. Louis before making the shift to St. Louis Public Radio.

When she’s not helping to produce the talk show, Evie can typically be found navigating the city sans car, volunteering for St. Louis BWorks or trying to get the majority of the dance steps correct as a member of the Thunder & Lightning Cloggers of Southern Illinois. She’s married to Joe, cat-mom to Dash and rather obsessive about doubt, certitude and the places where refuge and risk intersect.

Jim Henry has yet to visit New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon, the hallowed, high-desert landscape once home to ancestral Pueblo tribes. But the choral director has already fallen in love with the place, as have his music students at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

That’s due to a new symphony inspired by Chaco from local composer Gary Gackstatter, who is a music professor at St. Louis Community College-Meramec. On Monday, April 23, about 200 singers and instrumentalists from UMSL and from STLCC will perform the symphony during a free concert at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center.

“When I [first] played this piece for my students, they just could not wait to get on the stage,” Henry told host Don Marsh this week on St. Louis on the Air.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will talk with three women who recently ran for city council in Chesterfield, Creve Coeur and Kirkwood, Missouri, respectively, about what prompted their candidacies and how they hope to engage in their local communities going forward.

With the results of the April 3 elections still fresh in their minds, the panel of guests will include Jami Dolby, a Maryville University staff member who lost her bid for a council seat in Chesterfield; Heather Silverman, a program director for the National Council of Jewish Women and newly elected Creve Coeur council member; and Kara Wurtz, an Ascension Health senior financial analyst who won a seat in Kirkwood’s at-large race.

In tribute to NPR’s Carl Kasell, who passed away earlier this week, Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air included a segment in remembrance of the longtime newscaster and much-beloved radio personality.

The broadcast featured portions of a 2006 conversation between Kasell and St. Louis Public Radio host Steve Potter. During the interview, Kasell reflected on his decades in the radio business and the growth of NPR since he first joined the organization in 1975.

Wednesday marked the first anniversary of St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson’s time in office. The first woman elected to lead the Gateway City, she joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh for a conversation both reflecting on her first 12 months in the role and looking ahead.

In addition to saying she will sign current aldermanic legislation that would, respectively, give subpoena power to the Civilian Oversight Board and increase workforce inclusion goals, Krewson touched on the effort to create a buffer zone around St. Louis’ Planned Parenthood facility in the Central West End.

She also responded to a wide variety of other questions from Marsh and from listeners. Ten of them are included below – along with the full conversation here:

Edward O. Wilson’s long career has been marked by enormous contributions to the field of biology, with an impact on global conservation efforts that is difficult to overstate. All of it grew out of his close attention years ago to something relatively small: the behavior of ants.

Wilson recalled one of his earliest interactions with the insects, a memory from his boyhood in northern Alabama, on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air in conversation with host Don Marsh.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" during the noon hour on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

When Elsa Hart moved to St. Louis and set out to earn a law degree from Washington University, becoming a novelist wasn’t at the top of her agenda. But then neither did Li Du, the protagonist of her since-published historical mysteries, expect to morph into a detective.

Trained as an imperial librarian in early 18th-century China, the fictional character winds up solving crimes in the midst of an ancient eclipse of the sun and other unexpected adventures. Li Du is the central character in both Hart’s debut, “Jade Dragon Mountain” (2015), and its sequel, “The White Mirror” (2016), and still more surprises await him and his associates.

April is National Autism Awareness Month. On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about the prevalence of autism and discussed the latest research in the diagnosis and treatment of autism.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Religion and politics don’t always pair well, and both have a reputation as conversation stoppers. But so much of the work of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who was murdered 50 years ago this month, occurred at the intersection of those two often-avoided topics.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will discuss how King’s beliefs shaped his political vision and what lessons the civil rights leader’s legacy offers for politically and religiously committed people today.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Wednesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

With this year’s observance of National Healthcare Decisions Day set for next week, organizations including the local Gateway End-of-Life Coalition are focused on educating the public about advance care planning for patients and their families.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will explore the importance of thinking and talking early about what can often seem a difficult topic.

Mass shootings in U.S. schools continue to occur and make headlines. Other types of school violence, typically affecting one or two students at a time, garner less attention and more often end in suicide than homicide.

That’s according to University of Missouri–St. Louis criminologist Finn Esbensen, whose recent research in St. Louis County schools alongside colleague Lee Ann Slocum suggests that many young people struggle with school attendance out of fear for their safety.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Javad Khazaeli was just a toddler in 1977 when his family emigrated from Iran to the U.S., where he grew up in Edwardsville, Illinois. They became permanent citizens and “the picture of assimilation,” as Khazaeli wrote in a New York Times opinion piece this past fall.

But in late 2016, when his father was diagnosed with terminal cancer, executive action by President Donald Trump kept Khazaeli’s aunt, still based in Iran, from traveling to be with the family. The January 2017 order barred her and other residents of seven Muslim-majority countries from obtaining visas.

This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” at noon on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will lead a discussion about urban ecology and climate action as Earth Day approaches later this month.

This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” at noon on Wednesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

This week marks a half-century since the murder of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968.

Sonja Perryman’s love for storytelling developed early in life, along with her sense of its potential to impact lives. She has vivid memories of reading “The Baby-Sitters Club” books as a girl and telling her father about one particular character in the series.

The history of civil rights in St. Louis is compelling and complex.

More than 245,000 people have visited an exhibit at the Missouri History Museum detailing the area’s civil rights history. It closes April 15 after a 13-month run. 

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, listeners can catch host Don Marsh in conversation with bestselling novelist Anna Quindlen.

She was in town last week for a book-signing event presented by St. Louis County Library, and Marsh interviewed her on stage before an audience of more than 200 people.

This week brought the start of the Major League Baseball season and the first defeat for the St. Louis Cardinals, who lost a 9-4 opener to the New York Mets. But the Redbirds have 161 games yet to go this year, and longtime sports writer Rob Rains says the team is looking stronger than it was a year ago.

“I like the young pitchers,” he told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Friday. “I really think they’re probably still a year away from being a really good team because of the youth of the pitchers.”

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will talk with manuscripts curator Joel Minor, who oversees the Modern Literature Collection housed at Washington University Libraries, about the legacy of the late author and philosopher William H. Gass.

Gass, who passed away in December at the age of 93 and whose papers are part of the library’s archive of 20th- and 21st-century literary luminaries, was the David L. May Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Humanities at Washington University.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will talk with John Hayden, chief of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Last week, Jeff Pottinger and his band of 40-some Saint Louis University High School students were enjoying a trip they knew they’d remember for years to come when it suddenly became exponentially more unforgettable.

They were partway through a musical performance just outside St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican when Pope Francis himself approached the group, listened to them play, then talked with them and even took a few selfies with the teens.

“Magical” is one word that Pottinger used to sum up the experience while discussing it on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air with host Don Marsh.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Tuesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Women make up 14 percent of the U.S. military as well as a full quarter of the veterans who are pursuing a college education upon returning home from service. In the St. Louis area alone, evidence of their significant presence isn’t hard to come by.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with three local Army veterans about that growing force and about how St. Louis’ student veterans are collaborating as they plan for this year’s Student Veterans Week festivities set to begin March 17.

This interview will be on St. Louis on the Air at noon on Friday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

The fact that the St. Louis region encompasses nearly 90 municipalities comes up frequently in discussions about how the metropolitan area can move forward – and is sometimes cited as an explanation for regional challenges.

But David Miller doesn’t blink at that statistic.

Even as a young boy, Andrew Oberle knew exactly what he wanted to do for a living: work with chimpanzees. He was living his dream six years ago at an animal sanctuary in South Africa when tragedy struck.

Oberle recounted his survival of a near-fatal attack by chimpanzees, along with his experience along the road to recovery, during a Story Collider event this past fall. The piece also aired on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air.

The first question that St. Louis on the Air’s Don Marsh asked the Sauce Magazine team during Friday’s Hit List segment had to do with the word “cidery.”

The term was new to Marsh and understandably so, with St. Louis’ first such cider-focused brewery opening just about a week ago. Located in a former firehouse on Washington Avenue, Brick River Cider Co. was the first of four new, must-try restaurants that Catherine Klene and Matt Sorrell plugged during the discussion.

This post was updated following the March 5 show.

In his 25 years as a terrestrial and underwater archaeologist, Chris Begley has explored everything from prehistoric caves in Missouri to the legend of a lost civilization in Honduras. Along the way, he’s earned not just a Ph.D. but a reputation as “a real-life Indiana Jones.”

But on Friday, Begley downplayed the more daring aspects of his own adventures during a conversation with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh. He said his field work in relatively uninhabited areas of Central America as well as other places around the world doesn’t quite live up to what’s typically portrayed on the big screen.

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