Evie Hemphill

Evie Hemphill joined the St. Louis on the Air team in February 2018. After earning a bachelor’s degree in English literature in 2005, she started her career as a reporter for the Westminster Window in Colorado. Several years later she went on to pursue graduate work in creative writing at the University of Wyoming and moved to St. Louis upon earning an MFA in the spring of 2010. She worked as writer and editor for Washington University Libraries until 2014 and then spent several more years in public relations for the University of Missouri–St. Louis before making the shift to St. Louis Public Radio.

When she’s not helping to produce the talk show, Evie can typically be found navigating the city sans car, volunteering for St. Louis BWorks or trying to get the majority of the dance steps correct as a member of the Thunder & Lightning Cloggers of Southern Illinois. She’s married to Joe, cat-mom to Dash and rather obsessive about doubt, certitude and the places where refuge and risk intersect.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will discuss the history and science behind vaccination.

Joining him for the conversation will be Michael Kinch, author of "Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity."

Kinch is an associate vice chancellor and professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics at Washington University and director of the Centers for Research Innovation in Biotechnology and Drug Discovery.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Wednesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Last week, University of Missouri System President Mun Choi sent a message to members of the four campus communities across the state reaffirming a “commitment to institutional accountability, transparency and the protection of our students, employees, patients and visitors.”

“The issues of sexual assault, harassment, bullying, discrimination and workplace misconduct are at the top of our collective consciousness,” Choi’s email read in part, “and academic institutions have often minimized such occurrences in an attempt to protect the university’s reputation … We will never place concerns for our reputation above the welfare of the people we serve, and we will not tolerate misconduct.”

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will discuss ways in which area institutions are responding to renewed focus on such issues.

A few weeks after the #MeToo movement first gained traction in October 2017, a related hashtag also began appearing on social media: #ChurchToo. It quickly caught the attention of Marie Griffith, a faculty member at Washington University who was raised Southern Baptist.

For Griffith, who leads the university’s John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, the idea that sexual harassment and assault occur within Christian faith communities wasn’t new. What was different was the growing spotlight on the problem. In some cases, the outcry led to the resignation of powerful pastors who had abused victims for decades.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh got an update from St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jo Mannies on the latest news concerning former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

Mannies reported Tuesday that state Rep. Jay Barnes (R-Jefferson City) had filed a formal complaint with the Missouri Ethics Commission. It accuses Greitens of intentionally skirting election laws.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Wednesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

A treasure trove of St. Louis-based filmmaking talent will be in the spotlight throughout the next two weekends as Cinema St. Louis’ annual Filmmakers Showcase gets underway at Washington University on Friday.

One of the locally driven films set to screen Saturday is “Gateway Sound,” which was produced and directed by Justin Fisher, an audio engineer and educator. The documentary explores the state of the recording industry in St. Louis and beyond.

Fisher will join St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Wednesday for a conversation about the project and how recording professionals are adapting in an age of music streaming, slumping record sales and easily accessible recording technology.

Many are familiar with “Little Boy Blue,” a poem by Eugene Field that paints the sad picture of the little toy dog and the little toy soldier waiting decades for the toddler who had kissed them goodnight to return.

The death of children in the late 1800 and early 1900s was not uncommon, even in middle class families such as Field’s, due to lack of knowledge about contagious diseases and certain kinds of infections, historian Bonnie Stepenoff told host Don Marsh on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Two hundred forty-two years ago this week, the American colonies formally declared their independence from Great Britain. But the Continental Congress’ adoption of the handwritten document – and the accompanying revolution – would not be televised or tweeted.

Instead, printed versions of the Declaration of Independence were quickly posted on courthouse doors throughout the colonies, where people gathered to read and discuss what had occurred.

The U.S. Supreme Court dealt a significant legal blow to public-sector unions earlier this week with its decision in Janus v. AFSCME, an Illinois union-dues case. The ruling comes as Missouri voters gear up to decide Aug. 7 whether to pass a right-to-work referendum, Proposition A, that would impact collective bargaining in the private sector.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh went Behind the Headlines with a discussion about the state of organized labor in the bi-state region in light of the ruling. Joining him for the conversation was the president of the St. Louis Labor Council, Pat White, who described the court decision as “another attack on working men and women.”

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" during the noon hour on Wednesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Look out, St. Louis: Some of the nation’s top fencers are about to invade this baseball town. The 2018 National Championships begin Thursday at the America’s Center Convention Complex downtown.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will talk about how the sport of fencing has grown in recent years in St. Louis.

Joining him for the conversation will be three elite, locally based fencers.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will discuss river and floodplain policy in the region.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Friday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will take a look at the local ramifications of a news story that continues to rock the nation: the treatment of migrant parents and children along the U.S.'s southern border.

Joining him for a conversation focused on President Donald Trump’s evolving immigration policies will be three St. Louis-area residents whose areas of expertise shed light on the real-life impacts of those policies:

National freight volume is expected to grow significantly over the next 30 years according to regional leaders who want to ensure that St. Louis captures a share of the increase in traffic. Mary Lamie is one of them, and she’s hopeful about the possibilities ahead considering the Gateway City’s existing infrastructure and assets.

“We are strategically located in the United States for freight movements,” Lamie, the executive director of the St. Louis Regional Freightway, said Wednesday on St. Louis on the Air. “We’re home to six Class I railroads, four interstates, two international air-cargo airports – and we have some of the best manufacturing logistics supply chains within the nation.”

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will offer listeners a sneak peek at BBC’s new documentary “Robert Campbell, Mountain Man.”

The discussion will take place just ahead what’s being billed as the North American premiere of the film in the Public Media Commons on Monday evening. (The film is also scheduled to air on the Nine Network at 8 p.m. on July 2.)

A creative collaboration between a nationally known playwright and a group of women incarcerated in Vandalia, Missouri, is bringing new voices and stories to St. Louis theater-goers with the production “Run-On Sentence.”

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the initiative, which is a partnership between Prison Performing Arts and the award-winning SATE Ensemble.

The effort aims to move and entertain audiences and extend public awareness, particularly about the effects of incarceration and innovative, artistic approaches to rehabilitation.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

NiNi Harris’ latest book, “This Used To Be St. Louis,” explores the many layers of history undergirding downtown St. Louis.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will talk with the locally based author and historian about the new volume.

They’ll discuss her observations of the city’s past and how each layer of history has left its imprint on St. Louis.

After serving his community in Ferguson for more than seven years and emerging as a leader following the killing of Michael Brown in 2014, Rev. F. Willis Johnson is being transplanted to Columbus, Ohio, where he will grow a new church.

Johnson was the pastor of Wellspring Church in downtown Ferguson until it recently closed. He is also the co-founder/director of the Center for Social Empowerment and author of “Holding Up Your Corner: Talking About Race in Your Community.” On Tuesday, Johnson joined host Don Marsh on St. Louis on the Air to discuss his time in St. Louis.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Friday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

66 Park-In, the Airway Twin, Holiday – do these long-lost local venues ring a bell? Several decades ago, they and other outdoor movie theaters were all the rage in the Gateway City.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will discuss the history of the region’s drive-in theaters and some of the nostalgia, films and stories associated with them.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

As the 100-year-old Muny marks its centennial season of outdoor musical theater, another Forest Park mainstay is also celebrating the milestone – with “Muny Memories: 100 Seasons Onstage.” That show opens Saturday at the Missouri History Museum.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will offer listeners a sneak peek at the new exhibit, which explores the Muny from many different perspectives.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Tuesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

A growing number of children in St. Louis and Missouri are in foster care, with the opioid epidemic cited as a driving factor.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will discuss the region’s changing foster-care needs and some of the latest strategies aimed at helping vulnerable children and families across the city and the state.

Joining him for the conversation will be Melanie Scheetz, executive director of the Foster & Adoptive Care Coalition, and Ryan Dowis, chief operating officer for Cornerstones of Care.

Tonight, Eric Greitens will step down as Missouri governor, with Lt. Gov. Mike Parson replacing him. In exchange for his resignation, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner agreed to drop Greitens’ tampering charges.

In April, the arrest of two black men at a Starbucks store in Philadelphia sparked outrage across the U.S. The incident prompted the company’s announcement that it would close thousands of stores for one afternoon this spring in order to conduct nationwide training on implicit biases.

As that training got underway on Tuesday, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh talked with Washington University’s Calvin Lai, who is the director of research for Project Implicit.

An assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences, Lai is interested in thoughts and feelings outside of conscious awareness or control. Those thoughts and feelings can influence how we make sense of and judge other people, Lai said, and are reflective of “both the culture and the person.”

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Wednesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

What is it about summer camp that makes it such a tradition across generations and geographies? And what are some of the contemporary options for keeping children engaged in the summer months right here in the bi-state region?

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will talk about making the most of summertime through camp experiences and other summer-programming opportunities.

The month of May is designated as Older Americans Month. It also marks the 36th anniversary of the founding of the Oasis Institute – a local organization that aims to meet the needs of aging Americans and keep them engaged by offering learning programs, health education and volunteer opportunities.

Marylen Mann founded the organization that serves older adults aged 50 and older. But she said “aging is just a state of mind.”

Collectively speaking, we’re living more and more of our lives virtually, and that includes the ways in which we seek out medical care.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the ways that telehealth care is evolving and growing as an option among patients and providers.

Joining the conversation were Colleen Berding, telehealth program manager for the VA St. Louis Health Care System; Melissa Douglass, owner of Goal Driven Counseling and a recent University of Missouri-St. Louis social work alumna; and Dr. Jennifer Wessels, who is leading SSM Health’s newly launched telemedicine program with its primary care physicians.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Tuesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

The month of May is National Bike Month, and St. Louis just launched a bike-share initiative, with two companies – LimeBike and Ofo – now operating dockless systems in the region.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will lead a conversation on the topic of bike safety in light of the recent arrival of the bright yellow and green bikes around town and the presence of more cyclists in general on local streets as temperatures climb.

A few years ago as a guest on St. Louis on the Airauthor Benjamin Percy described Curtis Sittenfeld as “St. Louis’ literary warlord.”

Though she doesn’t proclaim command over the St. Louis region’s nearly 3 million residents or the authors who call it home, Sittenfeld’s residence here is a point of pride as is her authority over the English language in writing compelling stories. The bestselling author of five novels including “Prep,” “American Wife” and “Sisterland” has just released yet another book of fiction – and this one is a collection of short stories.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" during the noon hour on Thursday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will talk with St. Louis jazz great Denise Thimes about her upcoming Mother's Day concert.

Set for Sunday evening (May 13) at the University of Missouri-St. Louis’ Touhill Performing Arts Center, it will benefit the Mildred Thimes Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research, which the vocalist founded and named in remembrance of her mother two decades ago.

The third annual Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis gets underway later this week in honor of a legendary American playwright, poet and artist who spent many formative years in the Gateway City.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed some of the highlights of this year’s lineup in celebration of Williams.

When Audra McDonald reflects on the relentless pace of her years performing on Broadway and in many other venues over the course of her career, the sport of baseball comes to mind as a fitting comparison.

“Your entire day, every single day, is about [keeping] my body and my health in optimal shape so that I can do the show, because our bodies are our instruments,” the six-time Tony Award-winning singer and actress said on this week’s St. Louis on the Air.

Smartphones, tablet computers and other internet-oriented devices fill today’s digital age, and yet access to these common technologies is not universal.

A full quarter of Americans were still without broadband as of about a year ago, according to TIME, and many U.S. young people experience what has become known as the digital divide on a daily basis in their schools throughout the country.

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