Harum Helmy

Health and Wealth Reporter

Harum Helmy started as KBIA's Health and Wealth reporter in January 2013. She has previously worked at the station as a news assistant, helping assign and edit stories by student reporters. Harum grew up in Jakarta, Indonesia and graduated from MU with degrees in journalism and anthropology in 2011. She's trying to finish up an MA in journalism. 

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Harum Helmy / KBIA News

The St. Louis-based nonprofit, nonpartisan group Missouri Foundation for Health held a community forum in Columbia at the ARC Monday night about the state’s Medicaid expansion debate. The foundation’s director for health policy Ryan Barker presented the pros and cons of the expansion to an audience of about 45 people, before opening up the floor to questions.

With the Rural Reads series, we’re trying something new. Every Friday, KBIA’s Health and Wealth Desk curates the week’s most interesting (or so we think) articles and reports on rural issues.

What’s in a definition? The eligibility for federal grants

In February, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released a report that recommends defining ‘rural’ as areas with 50,000 or fewer residents - a number that's getting some strong reactions. The rural definition determines eligibility for USDA’s rural grants and programs. 

The excellent online news service The Daily Yonder is publishing a series of opinion pieces in response to USDA’s newest recommendation. Last week, Aletta Botts, a legislative staffer who helped draft the 2008 Farm Bill, wrote that the 50,000 size limit is too large and would hurt smaller communities that can’t compete with larger towns to win federal grants.  

Alexandra Olgin / KBIA News

A recent study by researchers at Chicago’s Roosevelt University found that between 2007 and 2011, the number of deaths from heroin overdose in the state of Missouri more than tripled. In 2007, fewer than 70 people died from heroin overdose. In 2011, that number ballooned to 244. 

Studies show most accidental overdoses happen in the presence of others. KBIA’s Alexandra Olgin takes us to a rally in Jefferson City on Tuesday supports a bill that could encourage overdose witnesses to be a Good Samaritan and call 911.

401kcalculator.org

Barring a congressional miracle,  Medicare payments to health care providers throughout the country will see a 2 percent reduction come Friday. That amount might not sound like much, but rural hospitals and their surrounding communities are the ones that would feel most of the pinch.

Jeanine Anderson / Flickr

This week -- we’re hearing about the Medicaid expansion debate down in West Plains -- the seat of rural Howell County. A study by the Missouri Budget Project shows that Medicaid expansion would have its most dramatic impact in the state’s rural areas.

Courtesy of I Am Breathing Film

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

Eight months after doctors diagnosed him with a disease that attacked his nerve cells, successful British architect Neil Platt became paralyzed from the neck down.  As the down-to-earth, often humorous Neil struggled to figure out his legacy for his young son, filmmakers Emma Davie and Morag McKinnon gained intimate access to the Platt family in Neil's last months. 

The film, I Am Breathing, will get its North American premiere at this year's True/False Film Festival. Neil described the film as "a tale of fun and laughs with a smattering of upset and devastation." 

Courtesy of Tremolo Productions

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

What happens when you end up in the background of someone else’s accomplished dreams? That’s the central question in documentarian Morgan Neville’s Twenty Feet from Stardom. The film will be screened at the True/False Film Festival

Is high-speed Internet the way to attract more people to live in rural Missouri? One MU professor seems to think so. First – let’s dial back a little bit. In a story that KBIA aired on Feb. 13, our reporter Lukas Udstuen investigated the story of Goss, a rural town in Monroe County, Missouri. Its population? Zero.

Flickr / San Jose Library

The Missouri General Assembly now has an oral health caucus. Co-chaired by Reps. Donna Lichtenegger (R-Jackson) and Jeanne Kirkton (D-Webster Groves), the caucus held its first meeting Monday, Feb. 11. A big item on the caucus' agenda? Reinstating the position of dental director in the state's health department. 

Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

This week on the show: the Medicaid expansion debate continues. Plus: what Mid-Missourians are concerned about as the President prepares for his State of the Union address.

Syndicate Mizzou / Syndicate Mizzou

  MU nursing professor Tina Bloom interviewed 24 pregnant rural Missouri women to learn about what makes them stress. She said what she found challenges her idyllic vision of rural life.

78-year-old Robert Hill of Warsaw was the man killed by another patient at Truman Veterans Hospital on Friday, Columbia police spokesperson Sgt. Joe Bernhard said in a release. 

Bernhard said Hill was involved in an assault at about 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 1. He died from the injuries he sustained in the assault. The release said no weapons were involved in the assault, but didn't go into further detail.

Office of Missouri Governor

From KBIA’s Health, Wealth and Society Desk, the first installment of a weekly rundown of health news affecting mid-Missouri.

Missouri Secretary of State

 A new report by an MU policy analyst warns about the consequences of a ballot measure passed by Missouri voters last November.

Harum Helmy / KBIA

The Columbia School District's Board of Education is reconsidering the school start times included in its controversial three-tier transportation plan. At last night’s board meeting,district parents, students and employees spoke loud and clear: The current proposed start times simply don’t work.

S&T Design / Missouri Science & Technology

It’s been dubbed the Interdisciplinary Intercampus Research Program and it has a starting fund of a million dollars. The new program’s goal is to promote research that has high potential for external funding and commercialization.

Mike Nichols is the UM system’s vice president for research and economic development. He says a successful collaboration by scientists at UMKC and engineers at Missouri S&T inspired the funding’s creation. The team developed a bioactive glass material that helps heal open wounds.

Ed Yourdon / Flickr

According to the latest U.S. Census Bureau data, 14 percent of people in Missouri live below the poverty line. That’s almost 900,000 Missourians. KBIA’s Harum Helmy finds out how one nonprofit organization attempts to educate the 86 percent about what it’s like to be on the other side.

Photo courtesy of First Baptist Church

About one month ago, the Rev. Carol McEntyre started as senior pastor at First Baptist Church in Columbia.

Riding with the Bike Brigade

Mar 30, 2012
SFBike / Flickr

This week, we hear how one person deals with homesickness, when home is almost ten thousand miles away. But first, we hit the streets of Columbia on bikes.

Kirk Kittell / flikr

Renewable energy was the topic of a conference on the MU campus today. About 180 people from around the Midwest gathered to hear from experts on the future of wind, biomass and solar energy in the region.

Harum Helmy / KBIA News

What happens when four self-proclaimed parking violators get together for True/False Film Festival's annual March March Parade? They get dressed up as meter maids. The theme for this year's festival is "the influencing machine," and the four women picked parking meters as their chosen apparatuses. Ann Breidenbach, Jacquelyn Sandone, Barbie Reid and Elizabeth Bergman say they want to remind out-of-town filmgoers to watch out for parking tickets. KBIA's Harum Helmy bring us an audio postcard from this year's parade. 

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