Hope Kirwan

Reporter/Producer

Hope Kirwan is a reporter/producer for KBIA's Health & Wealth Desk. Originally from Macomb, IL, she is a senior at the University of Missouri studying Broadcast Journalism, and Spanish. She has worked as a student reporter for KBIA and also reported for Tri States Public Radio in Macomb.

 

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  Education officials are notifying Missouri community colleges that the state might reduce reimbursements for the A+ scholarship program.

The A+ program gives high school graduates who meet certain criteria reimbursements for two years of classes at a community college in the state.

Jane Piester, A+ Coordinator for Rock Bridge High School, said although there is currently a shortage of funding, she does not think the program is in danger long term.

Meet The Press / NBC

A visibly-nervous Chuck Todd took over last Sunday morning as the moderator of NBC's flagship political program, "Meet the Press." With the show having previously experienced a drop in ratings many wonder if audiences are over Sunday morning talk shows -- or if Todd has the power to turn things around. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Fox & Friends / Fox News

More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. After TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely. “Fox & Friends” co-hosts responded to the video with comments including “she still married him” and “the message is, when you're in an elevator, there's a camera." Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Travis McMillen

  

    

  More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. For months the NFL was criticized by activists, reporters and columnists for only having suspended him from the first two regular season games. But after TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely.Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

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Of the numerous items Missouri legislators will consider during this veto session, Senate Bill 841 has state health advocates paying attention. The bill's main purpose was to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors. But these good intentions may have led lawmakers astray.

Hey Paul Studios via Flickr

The nurse who was walking across part of Missouri announced this morning that she will not be continuing her walk.

Sherry Payne posted on her organization’s Facebook page that the RV she was using in her trek from Clinton to Augusta was hit in Jefferson City on Sunday night. While the driver of the other car is still unknown, Jefferson City Police Department confirmed that there were no injuries in the crash.

Gary He / US Department of Labor

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) called out male senate colleagues for comments made about her body, like “pooky” and “fat,” in her new book, Off the Sidelines. Should the names of the senators be revealed?

Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

 

Austin Federa / KBIA

In the wake of the Michael Brown shooting, residents of Ferguson are still dealing with the emotional effects of the conflict.

Bianca Huff and her three-year-old son live in Canfield Green, the apartment complex where Michael Brown was shot and killed on August 9. Five days after Brown’s death, KBIA producer Bram Sable-Smith talked with Huff about how she has been helping her son understand everything that has happened.

“He’s seen the police before, so he was like ‘Did the police do this?’ and ‘How did the boy pass?’ and just different questions,” Huff said. “And he be like ‘So he gone?’ And I said ‘Yeah, he gone but he in a better place’ And he just say ‘Ok’ and keep going about the day. So as long as he don’t get too distraught, I just let him do that.”

Fortunately, there are people already on the ground in Ferguson helping people like Huff and her family cope with the recent tragedy in their community.

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What one journalist, and former KBIA reporter, witnessed other reporters do in Ferguson, Mo. led him to stop filing stories. Al Jazeera freelancer Ryan Schuessler wrote a personal blog post detailing the disrespectful actions he saw and why he decided to leave (for now). Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Courtesy Columbia Daily Tribune

When the Columbia Daily Tribune published an editorial cartoon about looting in Ferguson, Managing Editor Jim Robertson said the intent was to be provocative. What some readers saw was racism. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Austin Federa / KBIA

As demonstrations continue in Ferguson Missouri in response to the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown, youth in the community are grappling with what is happening in their community. A team of KBIA reporters on Thursday went to the apartment complex where Brown was shot five days earlier to have conversations with young people about the past and future of their town.

Kyle Spradley / MU News Bureau

Over 1 million Missourians experience some level of food insecurity and the Food Bank of Central and Northeast Missouri is looking to do something about it. Through MU's Grow Well Missouri Project, people enrolled in Missouri's Food Bank program can receive fruit and vegetable seeds and transplants along with their monthly package of food.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

    

  As Father Knute Jacobson of Calvary Episcopal Church in Columbia prays, farmers and their families bow their heads and press their hands to a big, green, John Deere combine.

The combine blessing was just one of the events at the Boone County Farm Bureau’s Safety Expo held in Columbia Saturday, August 2. It was the first time attendees had been invited to pray for the collective safety of farmers this upcoming harvest season.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

 

  Zane Volkman has been riding for as long as he can remember.

From the steer he would ride through his family’s pasture, to a donkey and finally to his grandpa’s horse, Volkman was already an experienced rider when he started training colts for a local rancher at age 12.

But an accident in the summer before his senior year of high school made it unclear if Volkman would be able to continue his career on a horse. While working at a livestock market in Kingdom City, Mo., a routine dismount caused Volkman to break his back and sustain three brain bleeds.

KBIA

On this week's Intersection, we are talking with board members from Health Literacy Missouri about how to talk to your doctor.  

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MU medical student Kayla Matzek is working at Cox Hospital in Branson, Missouri this summer. While a community with a population of only 10,000 might not seem attractive to some medical students, southwest Missouri is right where Matzek wants to be.

“I specifically want to go to a rural community because I think that you just get to know people more and it’s more of an intimate setting,” said Matzek, who grew up in a small town less than 30 minutes away from Branson.

epSos .de / Flickr

 Last month the U.S Department of Health and Human Services announced that more than 150,000 Missourians have signed up for health insurance under the ACA and many will be paying $60 or less a month for their plan after tax credits.

I talked with Karen Edison, founding director of the MU Center for Health Policy about why this could be called a success in Missouri.

JR / Flickr

The gaffe came during a discussion with New York Times columnist Jim Stewart, who was on "Squawk Box" talking about his piece dealing with corporate culture and gay executives. Co-anchor Simon Hobbs commented on what he believed to be public information, and turned out to be the opposite.  Missouri School of Journalism professors Amanda Hinnant, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

COM SALUD / Flickr

 

Almost 800,000 uninsured Missourians became eligible for coverage through the federal health insurance marketplace earlier this year. As the state continues to consider extending coverage to even more individuals through Medicaid expansion, the need for primary care doctors will increase as well.

C-SPAN

  Last week there was lots of talk about a hearing in which Dr. Mehmet Oz met his match in U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.). She's the chair of the Consumer Protection Committee.  Oz went before the committee to testify on the marketing of "miracle" weight loss cures. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

thierry ehrmann / Flickr

  Journalists around the globe are decrying an Egyptian court's decision to imprison three Al Jazeera English journalists on charges of making false news reports and aiding terrorists. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

jasonwhat / Flickr

Bigger than baseball?

With ratings for Sunday's U.S.A-Portugal game tipping in at just more than 24 million television viewers, it's probably safe to say World Cup fever has swept the nation.  ESPN reports more than 18 million tuned in to its main, English-language broadcast -- an audience bigger than single games of both the World Series and the NBA finals.

Closed Loop Healthcare / Smart America

 Your medical record can be more than just the file in which your doctor scribbles notes during your appointment. With help from movement sensors similar to those in an Xbox Kinect, patient data can be recorded in the home and shared easily with your network of doctors and hospitals, creating a comprehensive and accessible medical file. 

  As the violence escalates in Iraq at the hands of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), there's a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act.  What do Paul Wolfowitz, Paul Bremer, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) have to say today that's different than prior to the 2003 invasion of Iraq? Missouri School of Journalism professors Margaret Duffy, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

New York Times/TBrand

  The New York Times has launched a multimedia report -- complete with video, audio and interactive graphics -- on what life is like for women in our federal prison system.  It is native advertising, paid for by Netflix, as a promotion for its hit series, Orange is the New Black. Missouri School of Journalism professors Margaret Duffy, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

  The Columbia Farmer’s Market brings many different people together on Saturday mornings. Thanks to a local food program run by Sustainable Farms and Communities, this includes low-income families who can receive extra help to purchase fresh and locally-produced foods.

jajah / Flickr

  The folks at the online dating site eHarmony have some advice for people looking for Mr. or Ms. Right -- journalists make great life partners! Missouri School of Journalism professors Katherine Reed, Mike McKean and Amy Simons talk about the positives and negatives of dating a journalist.

Keith Allison / Flickr

Did George Will go too far, writing in his Washington Post column that being a sexual assault victim has become a "coveted status" on college campuses? Missouri School of Journalism professors Katherine Reed, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

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