Hope Kirwan

Reporter/Producer

Hope Kirwan is a reporter/producer for KBIA's Health & Wealth Desk. Originally from Macomb, IL, she is a senior at the University of Missouri studying Broadcast Journalism, and Spanish. She has worked as a student reporter for KBIA and also reported for Tri States Public Radio in Macomb.

 

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Hope Kirwan / KBIA

Representative Jay Barnes of Jefferson City is sponsoring a bill this legislative session that would help develop health clinics at underserved Missouri schools.

House Bill 320 is still in committee, but this is the second year that Valley Middle School in House Springs, Mo. has served students in their in-school health clinic


Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map


Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning, etc. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map


Alex / Flickr

It’s generally known that women tend to live longer than men. But what’s less known is how the same longevity can be a  financial burden for women.

Last month, the Women’s Foundation of Greater Kansas City and the MU Institute of Public Policy released a report called Status of Women in Missouri. According to the report, women make up two-thirds of the Missourians aged 65 and older who are living in poverty.

“Their lives are much longer but then you couple that with the pay gap,” said Wendy Doyle, President and CEO of the Women's Foundation.

Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning, etc. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map


Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning, etc. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

Nine high school students from Columbia, Jefferson City, Boonville and Osage Beach competed in this year’s central Missouri regional Poetry Out Loud competition at the Daniel Boone Regional Library last week.

Hickman High School student Shakira Cross recited the poem “Grief” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning as she gestures freely with her hands and arms.

Andy Lamb / Flickr

Hepatitis C is a virus that affects the liver, often causing liver cancer or cirrhosis. Although they share a name, it is completely different from hepatitis A or B so current hepatitis vaccines don’t guard against hep C.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about 3.2 million people in the United States have hepatitis C. But Bruce Burkett, Founder and Director of the Hep C Alliance, said the disease often goes untreated simply because people don’t know they are infected.

 


fhcmo.org

  It’s no secret that health insurance can be a confusing topic.

“There's not a ton of health insurance literacy,” said Aaron Swaney, Outreach Enrollment Specialist for the Family Health Center in Columbia. ”But that's true from people who have never had health insurance before to people who work in the healthcare field.”  

  

NEC Corporation of America / Flickr

There is a long list of to-do’s when applying for a medical license in Missouri. Applicants have to provide detailed verification of their degrees, residency and previous work experience. Tack on several months for the state medical board to review all these items, and the whole process can take a lot of time.

Most physicians go through this process when they are first applying for a medical license. But the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) found that many doctors don’t stop at one license.


Intel Free Press / flickr

As the use of telemedicine expands it is also growing the footprints of medical professionals, and when doctors licensed in one state begin consulting in another, it presents a problem for state medical boards. KBIA’s Hope Kirwan spoke with Jonathan Linkous, CEO of the American Telemedicine Association, about how states are regulating telemedicine.


Courtesy NBC

  When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including waterboarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Intel Free Press / Flickr

  Dr. Karen Edison is a dermatologist with the University of Missouri Health system. She has been using telemedicine for over 20 years to see patients at clinics in underserved areas of the state, and to follow-up with her rural patients in their homes. She can see photos of her patient’s skin, answer their questions through email, as well as talk with them through video calling.

Edison says telemedicine is a useful tool because it can save rural patients a trip to her office.

But rural patients aren’t only the ones looking to save time and money.

Missouri Foundation for Health

  Open enrollment for health coverage in 2015 is underway, and some Missourians satisfied with their current health insurance may be surprised to learn that parts of their plans, including premiums, are changed for the coming year. The Cover Missouri Coalition, a program of the Missouri Foundation for Health, is encouraging consumers to review their options during this year’s open enrollment period.

I spoke with Ryan Barker, Missouri Foundation for Health’s Vice President of Health Policy, about changes in this year’s health insurance marketplace.


   

Kyle Norris / KBIA

For the past ten years, Columbia Public Schools has continued to see an increase in total enrollment, adding about 150 students every year. Despite this growth, the school district has tried to maintain the same class size, turning to trailers to add more classrooms. KBIA’s Kyle Norris tells us how the school district hopes to move away from this temporary fix by creating a more permanent space for growing classes.

IMDB

The film, The Immitation Game, carries a PG-13 rating and The New York Times warns the film contains illicit sex, cataclysmic violence & advanced math?! Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

 


via Flickr user Gordon Correll

Comedian Chris Rock is on a publicity tour, promoting his new film Top Five. In multiple interviews Rock is asked about his reactions to the recent events in Ferguson and his take on racism in America. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

The University of Missouri is known for it’s School of Journalism. Every year, hundreds of freshmen from across the country come to school at MU to learn about news or sports broadcasting. But KBIA’s Jason Hoffman found one freshman who’s career in sports radio has an added challenge: He's blind.


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