Kelly Moffitt

Online producer for St. Louis Public Radio's talk shows St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Throughout the week, St. Louis on the Air has been hearing from listeners about their thoughts on the Stockley verdict and protests following it. Many have expressed disagreement with the verdict, but we’ve also heard from those who agreed with the verdict or who disagree with protesters’ tactics.

Join St. Louis on the Air for a live recording on Wednesday, Sept. 27 at 7 p.m. at Left Bank Books in the Central West End. Host Don Marsh will be joined in discussion by former St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter Nick Pistor, who recently published “Shooting Lincoln: Mathew Brady, Alexander Gardner, and the Race to Photograph the Story of the Century.

On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air, contributing host Steve Potter was joined by St. Louis Public Radio Executive Editor Shula Neuman to discuss protests and response to the not-guilty verdict of Jason Stockley in the St. Louis region. 

Neuman said Tuesday was declared a "self-care day" by protest organizers, with no planned protests but for an afternoon interfaith prayer service in the works. 

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, iconic author Margaret Atwood joined the program to discuss her career and legacy with contributing host Steve Potter.

There’s been a documented rise in popularity of dystopian novels this past year and “The Handmaid’s Tale” is no exception. As Margaret Atwood makes a visit to St. Louis to accept the St. Louis Literary Award, we speak with three local podcasters who were so inspired by the work that they made a podcast about it and the television show inspired by it this year (which won an Emmy on Sunday).

In November 2018, Saint Louis University, the oldest university west of the Mississippi, will mark its 200th year in higher education. It is the second oldest Jesuit university in the United States. SLU is kicking off celebrations a little bit early, starting this Saturday

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh checked in with St. Louis Public Radio Executive Editor Shula Neuman and Reporter Ryan Delaney on protests around St. Louis in response to Friday’s not guilty verdict of Jason Stockley in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith. Later in the hour, he spoke with two representatives of the Ethical Society of Police, which strongly opposed the verdict.

This weekend, Cherokee Street between Gravois and Jefferson will be officially designated as a Hispanic/Latino cultural district known as “La Calle Cherokee.”

The area, known for a proliferation of Latino-owned businesses and street festivals, will be unveiled as such during the annual Fiestas Patrias celebration observing Mexican Independence Day.

Joining St. Louis on the Air to discuss the importance of the designation and the celebration were:

Programming note: St. Louis on the Air will return at 10 p.m. with a special live check-in with St. Louis Public Radio reporters and editors covering the community's response to the Stockley verdict. You can listen live and follow updates from our Twitter account at @STLonAir.

The audio embedded below is from an earlier version of the program, which aired at 12 p.m.

Fifty-four works. Forty-two artists. A meditation on the colors blue and black. 

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation’s current leading exhibition “Blue Black,” curated by acclaimed Brooklyn-based artist Glenn Ligon, is on display until Oct. 7 and asks the viewer to contemplate identity, power and race.

The words “Alcoholics Anonymous” are synonymous with addiction treatment, but the people behind an alternative therapy hope that those dealing with addiction know there are other forms of treatment out there.

Arthur Shenker, a St. Louis-based facilitator who was at one time addicted to cocaine, and Dr. Joseph Gerstein, the founder and president of SMART Recovery, joined St. Louis on the Air on Thursday to discuss their program’s approach to treating addiction with cognitive behavioral therapy.

African-Americans over the age of 70 are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease as white people. While there are no answers, said Dr. John Morris, director of the Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University, there are some factors that might be contributing to this gap.

Updated on September 8, 2017:

A re-mix of “Then, and Now Again, a Workers’ Opera" will be performed on Sunday, September 10 at 1:00 p.m. at the Missouri History Museum in memory of Agnes Wilcox who passed away on August 28. The production will be directed by Freeman Word and is free and open to the public.

Famed author Salman Rushdie, visiting St. Louis this weekend to discuss his most recent novel, “The Golden House,” says that if you want to be a good writer, “you need to get into a lot of different kinds of rooms.”

He was referencing his knowledge of and imagination with the setting of his latest novel: a secluded garden in New York only accessible by the people whose homes abut the property. 

This week, The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis launches into the second half of its first century, embarking on its 51st season. It features a robust, wide-ranging lineup of productions from musicals to classics to two Tony Award-winning productions.

Can the story of the famed Dred Scott decision be effectively put to music? In this tenth year of the Chamber Project Saint Louis, composer Adam Manness is giving it a try.

Late last month former U.S. Senator from Missouri John Danforth published an op-ed in the Washington Post in which he called President Donald Trump the “most divisive president in our history.” He called for fellow Republicans to disavow Trump’s divisive tactics and redefine the Republican party.

Sound Bites is produced in partnership with Sauce Magazine, our monthly installment exploring cuisine in the St. Louis area.

If you’ve ever found yourself in the grocery store aisle, out to eat with family or friends or arriving to a BYOB party, you may have experienced that moment of crippling insecurity: do I go for the wine I know I like or the wine that will make me sound like I know what I’m doing? Oh, you haven’t experienced this? Maybe that’s just us here at St. Louis on the Air then…

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went Behind the Headlines to delve into the news that Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens granted a stay of execution for Marcellus Williams.

A teacher at New City School in St. Louis is using the controversy over Confederate monuments, including the recently-removed Confederate Memorial in Forest Park, to teach fifth graders about diversity, inclusion and conflict resolution.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard from that teacher, Stephanie Teachout Allen, who also serves as director of diversity and inclusion at the school, and David Cunningham, a professor of sociology at Washington University, about how they have hosted these conversations with children and others in their lives.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, our monthly Legal Roundtable convened to discuss pressing issues of the law.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the prevention of child abuse in the St. Louis region with DiAnne Mueller, the Chief Executive Officer of the Saint Louis Crisis Nursery

The organization provides emergecy intervention, respite care and family support. The five nurseries and nine outreach centers under the Saint Louis Crisis Nursery umbrella serve more than 6,800 children every year. Over the past 31 years, they’ve served over 110,000 children.

Did you hear? A major celestial event crossed the Missouri and Illinois skies on Monday, Aug. 21. St. Louis on the Air had you covered with a two-hour special during the eclipse.

From 12 – 2 p.m. on Monday, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh brought you a two-hour special program about the total solar eclipse, discussing the cultural, scientific, economic, and celestial phenomena.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, Ken Burns and Lynn Novick joined host Don Marsh to discuss their latest collaboration a 10-part PBS documentary, titled “The Vietnam War.”

"I don't think we ever said enough about it," Burns said of the war and how it has been covered after it ended. "... With the passage of time comes perspective."

Listen to the full conversation below:

We’re narrowing in on the day of the total solar eclipse, Aug. 21. Ahead of a weekend that’s expected to see a lot of travel to the region, we check in with the Missouri State Highway Patrol for updates on traffic and how to drive during the eclipse, the Missouri Division of Tourism and a Festus-based brewery prepping for the onslaught.

Related: What to expect from the rare solar eclipse

Last year, we held a local podcasting panel to help bring new St. Louis podcasters into the fold. In the lead up to that event, we spoke with Adam Frick, the founder of Hugmonster Sound, about his podcasting network STL Vernacular.

Native St. Louisan Jonathan Losos is a Harvard University biology professor and director of Losos Laboratory at the university. He recently wrote the book “Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance and the Future of Evolution.

The book follows researchers across the world who are using experimental evolutionary science to learn more about our role in the natural world.

The furor over the coming solar eclipse is reaching a fever pitch, causing us to ask: has it always been this way? On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the ways eclipses have been viewed in the past.

From Babylonians’ scientific tracking of eclipses to frequent myth and lore about the relationship between solar eclipses and animal feeding habits, we discussed how old views of solar eclipses impact our viewing of them today.

It’s that time of year again: children are heading back to school, some for the first time. On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the ways parents, family members and caregivers can support young children in making a successful transition into school life.

Joining the program to discuss was Stephen Zwolak, the CEO of the LUME Institute and Executive Director of the University City Children’s Center.

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