Kristofor Husted

Senior Reporter

Kristofor Husted is a senior reporter at KBIA in Columbia, Mo. Previously Husted reported for NPR’s Science Desk in Washington and Harvest Public Media. Husted was a 2013 fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources and a 2015 fellow for the Institute for Journalism and Justice. He’s won regional and national Edward R. Murrow, PRNDI and Sigma Delta Chi awards. Husted also is an instructor at the Missouri School of Journalism. He received a B.S. in cell biology from UC Davis and an M.S. in journalism from Northwestern University.

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CraneStation / Flickr

Growing across the Midwest is a strain of hybrid corn that should perform well under the driest conditions. Harvest Public Media’s Rick Fredericksen says this summer’s parched farmland is providing an ideal test.

Ladies, if the thought of showing up at a party or a picnic with a box of wine seems a little gauche, there's now a product for you: Vernissage's "bag-in-a-bag" of wine. It's boxed wine, shaped like a handbag.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • West Nile Virus strikes Mo. again
  • Sen. McCaskill visits MU to talk student loans
  • MU invests $2.5 million in online education

jeremy.wilburn / Flickr

Students in the Columbia Public School system who took Advanced Placement exams in 2012 outscored their peers across Missouri. Some of the district’s highest scores came in Psychology and Biology.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Sen. McCaskill roots out wasteful wartime spending
  • More Mo. youth covered by health insurance
  • Planned Parenthood supporters deliver petition to Rep. Akin

Adam Procter / Flickr

Updated 8/29/12 3:00 p.m.

The University of Missouri says it will keep its academic publishing business open and drop plans for a new reimagined publishing operation.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • New state laws take effect Tuesday
  • Rep. Akin reiterates stance on abortion, Sen. McCaskill talks veteran affairs
  • First Mo. death from West Nile

Kristian Molhave / Opensource Handbook of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

When fresh water animals, such as worms and mussels, were exposed to water loaded with carbon nanotubes, their health suffered, according to a new study published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. In fact, the bottom-dwelling critters didn’t grow as quickly and they didn’t survive as long as their counterparts living in cleaner water.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Apologetic Rep. Todd Akin chastised for "legitimate rape" comment
  • Sen. Claire McCaskill: Akin should be allowed to stay in race
  • MU enrollment numbers are up

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Missouri receives $6 million for transportation projects
  • Health care measure's language battled over in court
  • Quicksand popping up along rivers

As public school starts Thursday in both Columbia and Jefferson City, those school districts are dealing with a surge in student enrollment. To deal with this, the districts have hired several teachers at the last minute to maintain a healthy ratio of students to instructors.

Although enrollment numbers are expected to fluctuate for the next few weeks, Columbia and Jefferson City have added several teachers at the elementary level to accommodate the influx of younger students.

Camille Phillips / KBIA

The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education released the state’s 2012 school test scores Tuesday. And while the data show a small but fairly consistent improvement across most subjects, Columbia still has some work to do in a few categories.

The Missouri Assessment Program, or MAP, tests students from third grade through high school in areas such as communication arts, math and science. For the 2012 school year, the Columbia district met all 14 state standards to remain an accredited district.

Ben Skirvin / WFIU

A Missouri County jail inmate is back in custody after hijacking a car from a sheriff’s deputy.

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