Kristofor Husted

Harvest Public Media Reporter

Before joining KBIA in July 2012, Kristofor Husted reported for the science desk at NPR in Washington. There, he covered health, food and environmental issues. His work has appeared on NPR’s health and food blogs, as well as with WNYC, WBEZ and KPCC, among other member stations. As a multimedia journalist, he's covered topics ranging from the King salmon collapse in Northern California to the shutdown of a pollution-spewing coal plant in Virginia. His short documentary, “Angela’s Garden,” was nominated for a NATAS Student Achievement Award by the Television Academy.

Husted was born in Napa, Calif., and received his B.S. in cell biology from UC Davis, where he also played NCAA water polo. He earned an M.S. in journalism from Medill at Northwestern University, where he was honored as a Comer scholar for environmental journalism. 

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Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Sanders to remain Mo. Democratic Party leader
  • Beef labeling rule is caught in bureaucratic limbo
  • Economist casts doubt on Mo. business incentives

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Mo. House Speaker Tim Jones to give GOP response to state of the state
  • Mo. SOS Jason Kander giving public comment period on ballot initiatives
  • KC Medical School looking to open up shop in Joplin

roy blunt
TalkMediaNews / Flickr

The pentagon announced Thursday the lifting of a ban on women serving in combat. With the policy reversal, women will have the opportunity to serve in combat if they meet certain "gender-neutral standards."

Abbie Fentriss Swanson / Harvest Public Media

Farmers and ranchers across the country expected to start the New Year with a new farm bill, the all-important legislation setting agricultural policy for the next five years.

As House and Senate negotiators worked feverishly at the turn of the year to come to a fiscal cliff deal, word leaked that the Agriculture Committees had finally come to an agreement on a long-awaited new farm bill. But the final fiscal cliff deal ditched new legislation and merely extended parts of the bill that expired in October. Jeremy Bernfeld reports the extension left many farmers frustrated.

Regional new coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Gov. Nixon sets the special election date for Jo Ann Emerson's seat
  • Revamped GED to launch in 2014
  • Increase in passengers at St. Louis' Lambert Airport

Jay Nixon
KBIA file photo / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon plans to set June 4 as the special election date to fill the vacant seat in the Eighth District in southeast Missouri.

Rep. Jo Ann Emerson sent Nixon a letter Tuesday notifying him that her resignation from the seat would be effective at 11:59 p.m.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

Columbia mayoral candidate Sam Allison has announced his withdrawal from the city-wide race.

students in classroom
Brad Flickinger / Flickr

Columbia Public Schools announced Wednesday an expansion of an electronic reading program throughout the district.  With the myON reader program, students can log on to a website and have access to thousands of free electronic books.

Superintendent Chris Belcher calls it “amazon.com” for kids. He says the district has purchased a password to access the site for every 4-year old in the district.

Jacob McCleland / KRCU

The lingering drought continues to keep the Mississippi River at historically low levels. But now the Army Corps of Engineers says the river will likely stay open for transportation at least through this month. But many grain and energy industries that send products up and down the river aren’t yet breathing a sigh of relief. Iowa Public Radio’s Clay Masters reports from the Corn Belt where a lot of grain begin its journey south down the Mississippi.

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Nixon Sworn In As Mo. Governor, Begins Second Term
  • Jovan Belcher autopsy results show he was drunk at time of crime
  • State Sen. John Lamping calls out Gov. Jay Nixon on Twitter

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Nixon calls for lengthening Mo. school year
  • Mo. auditor confirms insolvency of disability fund
  • Republican: Akin 'partly right' on rape comment

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Columbia College president to retire
  • Disagreement in Mo. government about how to fill empty offices
  • Mo. public schools improve, but still rank low

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Coming up we’ll take a look at how the drought affected an outdoor industry completely dependent on water. But first, the United States Department of Agriculture is currently accepting claims from female and Hispanic farmers who believe the agency discriminated against them in farm loan or loan servicing programs. As Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer reports, the claims process is complex—but the payouts could be large.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Women, Hispanics can file claims for USDA discrimination
  • Mo. Republican sworn in as representative amid election dispute
  • Court weighs warrantless blood tests in DUI cases

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Rep. Hartzler opens office in Columbia, talks spending cuts and Hagel
  • New Mo. GOP chair plans more aggressive approach
  • 2012 was record warm year in much of Missouri

The Missouri Department of Economic Development announced Monday the approval of Enhanced Enterprise Zone, or EEZ, designation to the city of Centralia, Mo.

In the program, businesses could receive tax incentives as encouragement to open up shop in a certain area of the city. Zone designation is based on certain demographic criteria, the potential to create sustainable jobs in a targeted industry and a demonstrated impact on local cluster development, the department says.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

U.S. Rep. Vicky Hartzler opened the doors to her new office in Columbia Tuesday.

Dozens of supporters showed up to welcome the Republican congresswoman to the south Columbia location. For many of them it was the first time meeting her.

Though this is Hartzler’s second term in Congress, this is the first time she will be representing Boone County in the Fourth District. That’s because of redistricting that occurred after Missouri lost a spot in the House because of the state’s dip in population.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia City Council voted Monday to shut down the Enhanced Enterprise Zone advisory board. The vote effectively eliminates the effort to establish an economically incentivized zone for businesses in the city.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • State Sen. Schaefer's bill eliminates solid waste management districts
  • Holiday storms have limited impact on US drought
  • Mo. Supreme Court considers discipline for judge

This year's drought delivered a pricey punch to US aquaculture, the business of raising fish like bass and catfish for food. Worldwide, aquaculture has grown into a $119 billion industry, but the lack of water and high temperatures in 2012 hurt many U.S. fish farmers who were already struggling to compete on a global scale.

Money
File Photo / KBIA

Did you feel that pullback January 1st? That was Congress finally passing a compromise bill to prevent the country from careening off the fiscal cliff. In the early hours of 2013, the Senate passed the bill. And much later that day, the House passed it.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Sen. Claire McCaskill calls for closure of levee gap
  • Legislator pushes to limit drone use
  • "Share the Harvest" receives record venison donations

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Low levels of the Mississippi River to affect commerce
  • Gov. Nixon aims to make government more efficient
  • Elected teacher battles school board for leave of absence

images_of_money / Flickr

Had a hamburger lately? The cow it came from likely passed through a feedlot – a huge farm that fattens cattle before they’re slaughtered. The thousands of cattle housed at a feedlot produce tons and tons of waste. That manure can be used as a valuable fertilizer. But if it’s not properly disposed, it could lead to an environmental disaster. In Day 4 of Harvest Public Media’s series, America’s Big Beef, Jeremy Bernfeld reports.

quinn.anya / Flickr

On January 1st, 10 states, including Missouri, are scheduled to raise the minimum wage. Missouri’s minimum wage will jump up by 10 cents to $7.35 per hour. And, the pay increases could provide a nice bump in the state’s economy.

The minimum-wage increase comes after state voters approved a 2006 proposition to keep the minimum wage at a rate matching the growing cost of living.

Adam Kuban/flickr / http://www.flickr.com/photos/slice/482963344/

Columbia City Council is considering an ordinance that would put a temporary abeyance on demolition permits in downtown Columbia. This comes on the heels of a petition to demolish the oldest building downtown. KBIA’s Ryan Famuliner has a report on the zoning classification the council is looking at.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Memorial service at MU for Newtown tragedy
  • Extra police patrols at school campuses
  • UM System civil lawsuit over release of course syllabi

Hilary Stohs-Krause / NET

Over the next four weeks, Business Beat will be airing the remaining pieces of the Harvest Public Media series called America’s Big Beef: An Industry In Transition.

To kick off the series, we have to go back 150 years when Abraham Lincoln established the land-grant colleges where research could be done to help the common man. But Peggy Lowe of Harvest Public Media reports that today public colleges in the top five beef-producing states are now often working for big business.

Corn
jungmoon / Flickr

In recent months, a fairly severe drought and a slowly recovering economy have thrown food businesses for a loop.

Coming up we’ll listen in on a conversation Abbie Fentress Swanson had with President Barack Obama’s top agriculture guy about the looming dip in corn exports. But first, some businesses have been able to weather the storm better than others. Jennifer Davidson has this report about one successful shop in West Plains.

Now, things aren’t so peachy for everyone in the food industry. Clearly.

Sequestration, or the automatic across-the-board funding cuts set to kick in nationwide at the beginning of 2013, will tally nearly $110 billion dollars in cuts over the next nine years. The cuts are meant to alleviate the trillion dollar deficit. Congressional Republicans and Democrats are currently facing a stalemate on a solution to the severe fiscal cuts sequestration calls for while still fixing the deficit. KBIA’s Kristofor Husted reports that millions of dollars are at stake for the University of Missouri System.

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