Marshall Griffin

Statehouse Reporter

Missouri Public Radio State House Reporter Marshall Griffin is a proud alumnus of the University of Mississippi (a.k.a., Ole Miss), and has been in radio for over 20 years, starting out as a deejay. His big break in news came when the first President Bush ordered the invasion of Panama in 1989. Marshall was working the graveyard shift at a rock station, and began ripping news bulletins off the old AP teletype and reading updates between songs. From there on, his radio career turned toward news reporting and anchoring. In 1999, he became the capital bureau chief for Florida's Radio Networks, and in 2003 he became News Director at WFSU-FM/Florida Public Radio. During his time in Tallahassee he covered seven legislative sessions, Governor Jeb Bush's administration, four hurricanes, the Terri Schiavo saga, and the 2000 presidential recount. Before coming to Missouri, he enjoyed a brief stint in the Blue Ridge Mountains, reporting and anchoring for WWNC-AM in Asheville, North Carolina. Marshall lives in Jefferson City with his wife, Julie, their dogs, Max and Mason, and their cat, Honey.

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The Missouri Supreme Court heard three lawsuits Thursday that seek to erase new maps drawn during last year’s redistricting processes.

Marshall Griffin / St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee has passed a proposed constitutional amendment that would place caps on all state spending. 

A proposal has been scrapped by the Nixon administration to borrow money from Missouri’s state universities to help balance the state’s budget.

Rebecca Thiele / KBIA

The 2012 Missouri legislative session is underway – and as St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin tells us, much of the first-day talk revolved around the challenges facing the state’s public schools.

Missouri lawmakers return to Jefferson City today for the start of this year’s legislative session.  The year 2011 was marked by House and Senate Republicans fighting with each other over tax credits and redistricting, while still managing to take pot shots at Democratic Governor Jay Nixon’s handling of the state budget.  Marshall Griffin takes a look at how the 2012 session may play out.

A task force is recommending that funding for universities and community colleges in Missouri be based in part on graduation rates and other performance-based criteria.

KBIA

A Missouri House committee that’s been looking into natural disaster response has released a list of recommendations for lawmakers to take up next year.  One recommendation would give lawmakers more of a say into the use of the state’s Rainy Day fund.

missouri house floor
File Photo / KBIA News

Missouri lawmakers began pre-filing bills today for next year’s legislative session, which begins January 4th.

Missouri’s Economic Development department is defending its role in the controversy surrounding a failed artificial sweetener plant in the small town of Moberly.

Governor Jay Nixon told reporters during a press event at a Callaway County farm along the Missouri that farmlands damaged by both high water releases and levee demolition must be restored

happyfunpaul / Flickr

Preliminary figures were released Monday showing how many Missouri high school students graduated this year.

Steven Tilley has dropped out of the race for Missouri Lt. Governor, catching his fellow Republicans by surprise.

Tech. Sgt. Oscar Sanchez USDA / Flickr

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced Monday that it’s changing its short-term approach to managing water levels on the Missouri River, following devastating flooding this summer in Missouri, Iowa and North Dakota. 

One of the Republican leaders in the Missouri House plans to file a package of election-related measures when next year’s regular session begins in January.

Members of the Missouri Senate have returned to Jefferson City to begin week two of the special legislative session.�

By Marshall Griffin (Jefferson City, Mo.)

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