Mary Edwards

Mary Edwards came to St. Louis Public Radio in 1974, just after finishing her Bachelor of Music degree at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.  She has served the station in a number of capacities over the years, and is currently Production Manager.  In addition to overseeing all the production activities at the station, she is the producer of St. Louis Public Radio’s two local talk/call-in shows, “St. Louis on the Air” and “Cityscape,” and the live Saturday night broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony.  Mary also teaches an undergraduate class in radio production at Webster University and serves as Secretary of the University of Missouri-St. Louis College of Fine Arts and Communication Alumni Board. In her spare time, she enjoys playing the flute, participating in various music activities at her church, and water skiing.

A series of U.S. Supreme Court decisions including Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission struck down long-standing campaign finance laws. The rulings determined that the use of unlimited money to influence the outcome of an election by individuals, corporations, unions and other entities is free speech protected by the First Amendment.

The organizations American Promise and American Constitution Society have launched a national town hall tour to garner support for election financing reform which could result in a proposal for a 28th amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Thousands of miles separate St. Louis, Missouri, from Dortmund, Germany, but when it comes to immigration and refugee resettlement, the two cities aren’t so far apart.

Among the most pressing debates that link them are the “politically contradicting messages about the purpose of immigration,” as Florian Sichling describes the issue.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" over the noon hour on Friday; this story will be updated after the show.

Most Broadway actors relax on their Monday days off. But on Monday, April 16, "Hamilton" star Mandy Gonzalez will come to St. Louis to help raise awareness and funds for St. Louis’ december Magazine. She stars as Angelica Schuyler in the Broadway hit.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, our monthly Legal Roundtable panelists discussed recent issues pertaining to the law, including the indictment of Gov. Eric Greitens, the potential privatization of public defenders, research by Washington University students looking at gun violence and human rights, and more.

Joining the conversation were Mark Smith, J.D., associate vice chancellor of students at Washington University; William Freivogel, J.D., journalism professor at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale; and Rachel Sachs, J.D., associate professor of law at Washington University School of Law.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio reporters joined host Don Marsh to preview the 2018 Missouri legislative session, which opens tomorrow, Jan.3.

Statehouse reporter Marshall Griffin, political reporter Jo Mannies and interim political editor Jason Rosenbaum gave their insights on what to pay attention to in 2018.

On December 28 following a several months long search,

The Bach Society of Saint Louis is participating in a 500th anniversary commemoration concert drawing inspiration from the Reformation. The Reformation was a schism from the Roman Catholic Church initiated by Martin Luther in 1517.

Life did not start well for Sammy Rangel.

“When I was 45, I found out that I was the second child my mom had tried to kill,” he said.

Rangel is the executive director and co-founder of Life After Hate, a nonprofit organization formed in 2011 by former members of far-right extremist groups in the United States.

Leonard Slatkin spent 27 years with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, 17 of them as music director. When he left that post in 1996 the SLSO gave him the title Conductor Laureate. Since leaving St. Louis in 1996, he has been music director of the National Symphony Orchestra, the Orchestre National de Lyon and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, a post he will give up at the end of the current season.

A year and a half ago, the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, Springboard to Learning and Webster Arts formed a collaboration to document and celebrate the history of Meacham Park.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by Marsha Coplon, education director for The Rep, and Jeane Vogel, executive director of Webster Arts, to discuss the Meacham Park Celebration that is the culmination of the collaboration.

When the Missouri legislature convened on Jan. 4, it was anticipated that with a Republican governor and GOP majorities in both houses, a record number of bills might become law. But as it drew to a close, one Republican senator said the session may be groundbreaking in terms of its lack of productivity.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, we spoke with St. Louis Public Radio reporters Marshall Griffin, Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum about what did and didn’t pass.

"There are a lot of growing pains here," Griffin said. 

In 1996, former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher visited Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, the same place where almost 50 years earlier, Winston Churchill delivered his famous “Iron Curtain” speech.  During her visit, Thatcher gave a speech that still has relevance today, especially in light of the continuing threat of nuclear weapons by North Korea.