Rehman Tungekar

Producer

Rehman Tungekar is a former producer for KBIA, who left at the beginning of 2014. 

Rehman Tungekar joined KBIA in September 2011. Previously, he has worked with WNYC’s Radiolab, Chicago Public Media’s Vocalo.org and WBEZ’s Eight Forty-Eight. A Chicago native, he started out his professional career in science, but soon traded in a microscope for a microphone and hasn’t looked back since. Rehman is a graduate of the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies, where he focused on radio.

Ways To Connect

Clyde Bentley / Flickr

A new strategy aimed at cleaning up Hinkson Creek was unveiled at a public meeting on Wednesday. The event was led by representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency, Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Boone County, City of Columbia and MU. 

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

On early planting

Mar 22, 2012
Fiona Henderson / Flickr

On this week’s show, we’ll hear why farmers and gardeners should hold off on planting early this year, and find out why MU is hiring fewer international scholars.

Craig James / Flickr

Columbia has long been a hub for science and innovation in mid-Missouri, and the international scholars associated with the University of Missouri have contributed a lot to that distinction. But the number of international scholars MU hires has been decreasing for the past five years. 

When two high-speed trains collided on a bridge in southwestern China, the first report from the scene came from a victim, one minute later.  Her Twitter-style post ended with a dramatic cry for help.

Harum Helmy / KBIA

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

The science of food

Mar 16, 2012
Vanderbilt University / Flickr

Food Sense: The 8th Annual Life Sciences and Society Symposium takes place this week at MU. 

Diplomatic distress over Iran’s nuclear program is reaching a fever pitch.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

 

Sunday will mark the one-year anniversary of the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit coastal Japan. 

Brad Flickinger / Flickr

On this week’s show, we’ll talk about about exercise programs for minority populations, and hear about tablet technology in classrooms.

When it comes to food, it’s often hard to know what’s fact, fiction, or exaggeration. Join KBIA and Harvest Public Media for Digest This: a public discussion looking at the messages behind how our food is produced. Experts will examine the arguments -- and emotions -- that go into our food choices, and consider what’s at stake.

Documentary filmmakers, like journalists, seek to capture true stories in their work.

Sylvia Maria Gross / Harvest Public Media

On this week's show, we'll explore how some towns are dealing with poor access to affordable food. Plus, an interview with President Obama's principal environmental advisor.

KBIA visits Fulton

Feb 28, 2012

Fulton is a town of roughly 13,000 people, located about 20 miles east of Columbia. Some residents say that Fulton has an independent character, due in part to the presence of Westminister College and William Woods University. The town is also home to the Fulton State Hospital, and the Missouri School for the Deaf, which is the first of its kind west of the Mississippi. But Fulton is perhaps most famous for being the location Winston Churchill delivered his famous Iron Curtain speech, on the Westminister College Campus.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

Nigeria appears to be on the verge of a civil war. The instigator of escalating sectarian conflict seems to be a militant Islamic sect known as the Boko Haram. 

Discovering a comet

Feb 23, 2012
Kevin Dooley / Flickr

If you go stargazing tonight, you just might see a faint little speck with a Missouri connection.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

Advocates of media freedom and human rights say conditions are getting worse under Uzbek President Islam Karimov’s authoritarian rule. The last international monitor, Human Rights Watch, was evicted last year. 

Daniel Castellano / Flickr

 

On this week’s show, we’ll explore what's in our food, and hear from the director of a documentary that looks at the difficult choices involved with legalized, physician assisted suicide.

Full Frame Documentary Film Festival / Flickr

The film How to Die in Oregon, follows several terminally ill patients as they undertake the difficult decision to end their lives under the state’s controversial Death with Dignity Act.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's crackdown on opposition forces is escalating. Six straight days of heavy bombardment has left hundreds dead in Homs.

Melanie Cheney / Flickr

On February 2, the non-profit organization Missouri River Relief will host the Wild and Scenic film festival at the Blue Note in Columbia. Festival-goers can expect to see a variety of environmental and adventure films. One of those films, Big Muddy Clean Sweep, documents the organization’s trek across the state, cleaning the Missouri River aboard a barge.

Steve Schnarr is the program manager for Missouri River relief. We spoke to him about what it was like traveling across the state, his own connection to the Missouri River and what people could expect at the festival.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

Reporting in Cuba

Feb 2, 2012

Being an independent news reporter in Cuba is a dangerous occupation. The Committee to Protect Journalists points out that Cuba was once tied with China for holding the largest number of journalists behind bars. 

On food and phones

Feb 2, 2012
Kris Krüg / Flickr

 

On the show this week, we’ll revisit a report that tests the iPhone 4s’s ability to recognize accents, and hear from author Michael Pollan.

File / KBIA

A proposal to cut state funding to higher education would be devastating, according to MU Chancellor Brady Deaton.

Speaking on KBIA’s Intersection, Deaton said the 12.5% cut to MU’s budget would set the university’s state funding back to 1997 levels, despite having increased student enrollment by 50% in the time since. He says this would come on top of an already low record of state funding to higher education, with Missouri ranking lowest in terms of per capita funding among southeastern states.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

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