Ryan Famuliner

News Director

Ryan Famuliner joined KBIA in February 2011. It’s his second stint at KBIA. His first was from 2005-2007, as a student studying broadcast journalism at the University in Missouri. In his spell outside KBIA, Ryan worked as a general assignment reporter and videographer at WNDU-TV in South Bend, IN and as a reporter and anchor at the Missourinet radio network in Jefferson City, MO. He’s won Edward R. Murrow Awards for his reporting in both television and radio.

Ryan and his wife Kelly are ecstatic to be back home in Missouri. Hailing from the Kansas City and St. Louis areas, respectively, Columbia is a fantastic place to compromise. They spend an unhealthy amount of time at flea markets and junk shops, and watching Mizzou sports and Major League Baseball. They’re about a halfway through their MLB ballpark tour. Ryan’s also always up for a round of disc golf or a nickel-dime poker game.

Ways To Connect

rickbrattin.org

Mother Jones published an article Wednesday about Missouri House Bill 131, a bill proposed by Republican Rick Brattin from Harrisonville. It’s mandatory reading for what follows to make much sense.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom including:

Florida State University

  The University of Missouri has named Garnett Stokes as the new Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost. According to a press release, she will begin work on Feb. 2.

Stokes is currently the provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at Florida State University. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Carson-Newman College in Tennessee, and got her master’s degree and doctorate from the University of Georgia in industrial/organizational psychology


Obesity is the number one public health issue in Missouri – it affects more than 30% of adults and nearly one in seven children between the ages of ten and seventeen.

  News coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

Jack Howard / KBIA

One way CoMO Explained chooses topics for our episodes is from listener questions. Way back in our first iteration of the show a listener posted on Reddit and asked us why KBIA, an NPR station, plays so much classical music.

This episode is for that Reddit listener.


Marjie Kennedy / Flickr

On this week's Intersection, we will be discussing the November 4th ballot with guests from the Associated Press and The Missourian. 

The Mid-term election is tomorrow. Four amendments will be on the statewide ballot, and Republicans will look to maintain their veto-proof majority in the state legislature. One of the contested races generating some buzz is right here in Mid-Missouri. 

I had just walked off a cruise ship on a refreshing winter vacation, and was walking to the ship’s long-term parking lot in New Orleans. In a sun-soaked daze, I noticed a car with an official Missouri State Senate license plate, and chuckled. Small world.

For the past year, KBIA has been working on a special long-form story about a place in Northeast Missouri called Heartland. It’s a story with threads of religion, law, business, and morality that all end in a knot, in the middle of a cornfield.

    

Down 7-3 in the eighth inning of the American League Wild Card game, it seemed inevitable, even fitting, really. The Kansas City Royals waited 29 years to return to the postseason, only to be swept out in a one-game wild card playoff that has only existed for three years. The loss would have cut deep, like they always have in Kansas City. At least that I can remember.

Columbia Daily Tribune

Sales tax. Not a great opening line for journalists trying to educate people about how a city functions. The moment sales tax is mentioned eyes glaze over, something else suddenly becomes important, and we all casually scroll through twitter on our phones.

But sales tax is actually a really fascinating topic, especially right now in our city and country’s history. To learn why, we have to go back…way back, to 1970.

MU Archives

Peace Park is that grassy little knoll along the north edge of MU’s campus. It’s at the corner of 8th and Elm, a stone’s throw away from the columns. There’s a creek (or drainage ditch) that saunters through it, creating a calm and tranquil vibe for the meditators and hammock dwellers.    

    

Austin Federa / KBIA

 

The Shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri has received international attention

For more than a week now, Missouri citizens have gathered in the city to protest the police department, the killing of an unarmed teenager and racism within the community.

On this week's Intersection, we will be talking about Science Education in the Columbia Public School System 

  News Coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including detailed election results.

Austin Federa

Boone County Clerk Wendy Noren says voter turnout has been impressive in today's primary election. As of 12:30 this afternoon, more than 12,000 voters had turned out to vote,  which is approximately 13% of active voters in the county. Noren expects that number will rise to 25,000 votes by the time polls close tonight at 7pm. 

Opus Group

The City of Columbia has approved the building plans for the controversial Opus Group development downtown.

Columbia Police Department logo
File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia Police Department is warning that scammers are posing as representatives from the IRS or from Ameren Missouri in an attempt to get people to quickly send them money.

KBIA

On this week's Intersection, we are talking with board members from Health Literacy Missouri about how to talk to your doctor.  

Jefferson City Police Department

Jefferson City Police say they are ending the search for the body of Christopher Cray at the Allied Waste Landfill, just under a month after it began.

KBIA / KBIA

 

Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, or CAFOs, are prevalent in Missouri’s agriculture industry. The large farms are very controversial, and many have concerns about the environmental impact of the farms and humane treatment of animals living there. In Callaway County, plans for a new CAFO have prompted very vocal opposition. But CAFOs are also a mainstay of the agriculture industry, and are legal if maintained correctly.On this Intersection we addressed CAFOs in-depth: about what they are, how they’re used in Missouri, about the controversy surrounding them, and about the future of the operations in the state.

 

Have you ever left a doctor’s office with more questions than answers? Don’t let that happen again. 

Join us Thursday, July 24th for an evening of conversation with health literacy experts Dr. Steve Pu and Dr. Ingrid Taylor of Health Literacy Missouri. Come take part in a live taping of KBIA’s local talk show Intersection, hosted by Ryan Famuliner.

KBIA / KBIA

Women make up around 29% of the technology workforce nationally. Only 18 % of technology degrees were earned by women in 2012, which is down from 35% in 1985.

Columbia Water and Light crews have restored power to all customers who lost power in a severe thunderstorm late Monday night.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Thousands of Mid-Missourians are without power this morning and people are assessing damage after a severe thunderstorm tore through the area late last night.

Randy Smith and Team of Students

 

It’s been 20 years since the fall of apartheid in South Africa in 1994. For the last year now, students and faculty here at the University of Missouri have been assisting the University of Western Cape in preserving an archive of thousands of photographs, films, artifacts, oral histories and other historical documents related to the struggle for freedom during apartheid. 

 

The United States Veterans Health Administration has recently been under national scrutiny, after reports that veterans were on waiting lists at some VA hospitals for more than 30 days… in some cases, dozens of people had died while still on waiting lists to receive care. Moreover, there’s been evidence of efforts at some hospitals to hide evidence of those long waiting lists. Congress is discussing the issue, and the Veterans Affairs Secretary resigned last month.

For years now the state of Missouri’s infrastructure has been a concern for public officials, politicians and Missourians on the whole.The Missouri Department of Transportation and state legislators have come up with a way to combat the department’s shrinking budget, but it’s up to Missouri voters to approve it. Amendment 7 will be on the August ballot: it’s a three quarter cent statewide sales tax increase on everything except groceries and medicine.

Some believe that learning and listening to music, particularly classical music, at a young age is tied to success in the future. 

In Columbia, there are many efforts to get children interested in classical music: multiple avenues for music education, and even classical music performances in town targeted at kids.

Today on Intersection, we’ll talk about how young people in Mid-Missouri are exposed to these influences, and about some of the challenges in reaching them.

Guests:

MU News Bureau

The man who has overseen the University of Missouri College of Engineering for the last two decades will step down in the fall.

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