Ryan Famuliner

News Director

Ryan Famuliner joined KBIA in February 2011. It’s his second stint at KBIA. His first was from 2005-2007, as a student studying broadcast journalism at the University in Missouri. In his spell outside KBIA, Ryan worked as a general assignment reporter and videographer at WNDU-TV in South Bend, IN and as a reporter and anchor at the Missourinet radio network in Jefferson City, MO. He’s won Edward R. Murrow Awards for his reporting in both television and radio.

Ryan and his wife Kelly are ecstatic to be back home in Missouri. Hailing from the Kansas City and St. Louis areas, respectively, Columbia is a fantastic place to compromise. They spend an unhealthy amount of time at flea markets and junk shops, and watching Mizzou sports and Major League Baseball. They’re about a halfway through their MLB ballpark tour. Ryan’s also always up for a round of disc golf or a nickel-dime poker game.

Ways To Connect

On June 24, the Radio and Television Digital News Association awarded KBIA a prestigious Edward R. Murrow award for the feature report, "Youth in Ferguson, 'I want more for my city than what it is now.'"

You listen to KBIA, you read our website, you follow us onTwitter, like us on Facebook, and subscribe to the newsletter, but how well do you really know the news?

Kristofor Husted/KBIA/Harvest Public Media

On May 20th, KBIA held a community conversation event in Kennett, Mo. The goal was to bring local residents and leaders of rural southeast Missouri to the same table to discuss difficulties in access to health care, the struggling rural economy and how to fix it. It's an event we called Health Barriers: Symptoms of a Rural Economy.

You listen to KBIA, you read our website, you follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and subscribe to the newsletter, but how well do you really know the news?

Joe Gratz / Flickr

Governor Jay Nixon has commuted the sentence of a man who had been sentenced to life without the possibility of parole as a persistent drug offender in 1996. 

Linkedin

The engineer who was driving the Amtrak train that derailed in Philadelphia Tuesday night killing at least seven people is a 2006 graduate of the University of Missouri. 

Updated 11:42 a.m.:

Christian Basi, the associate director of MU’s News Bureau, says that he is aware of concerns regarding the timing of MU’s Alert system Wednesday night following the shooting at Hitt Street Garage and is working to provide answers. While multiple witnesses said via social media they heard shots fired at Hitt Street Garage just before 11 p.m. Wednesday, the first MU Alert was not sent until 11:28 p.m. Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin tweeted Thursday morning saying that MU is investigating the process of issuing alerts and will report the results. Basi declined further comment. 

Shelter Insurance will donate $450,000 to a project to build an apartment complex and temporary homeless shelter for veterans in Columbia called Patriot Place.  

The plan is to renovate the former Deluxe Inn on Business Loop 70 East into a campus with 25 on-site apartments and a temporary homeless shelter. There will also be space for case management and support services.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri Senate President Pro Tem Tom Dempsey says he has doubts about whether right-to-work can become law this year.

Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander announced in a press release Thursday morning that he will run for the U.S. Senate in 2016. If he wins the Democratic nomination, he would likely face incumbent Republican Senator Roy Blunt.

KBIA Overall Excellence entry for 2014 Edward R. Murrow Awards

If you click on the primary submission link, you will find the audio for KBIA’s entry to the Overall Excellence category. The stories are as follows (arranged by timecode on the submission). Please follow the accompanying links to see the web build-outs for these stories, and in some cases, links to the full-length stories, as some where edited down for time for this entry.

This is an edited version of KBIA's Heartland, Missouri, for consideration for awards submission. For the full version, follow this link: http://kbia.org/post/heartland-missouri

A newscast that aired November 5, 2014, which was completely dedicated to election coverage, for consideration for the 2014 Edward R. Murrow Awards:

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has pardoned nine people convicted of nonviolent crimes.

rickbrattin.org

Mother Jones published an article Wednesday about Missouri House Bill 131, a bill proposed by Republican Rick Brattin from Harrisonville. It’s mandatory reading for what follows to make much sense.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom including:

Florida State University

  The University of Missouri has named Garnett Stokes as the new Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost. According to a press release, she will begin work on Feb. 2.

Stokes is currently the provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at Florida State University. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Carson-Newman College in Tennessee, and got her master’s degree and doctorate from the University of Georgia in industrial/organizational psychology


Obesity is the number one public health issue in Missouri – it affects more than 30% of adults and nearly one in seven children between the ages of ten and seventeen.

  News coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

Jack Howard / KBIA

One way CoMO Explained chooses topics for our episodes is from listener questions. Way back in our first iteration of the show a listener posted on Reddit and asked us why KBIA, an NPR station, plays so much classical music.

This episode is for that Reddit listener.


Marjie Kennedy / Flickr

On this week's Intersection, we will be discussing the November 4th ballot with guests from the Associated Press and The Missourian. 

The Mid-term election is tomorrow. Four amendments will be on the statewide ballot, and Republicans will look to maintain their veto-proof majority in the state legislature. One of the contested races generating some buzz is right here in Mid-Missouri. 

I had just walked off a cruise ship on a refreshing winter vacation, and was walking to the ship’s long-term parking lot in New Orleans. In a sun-soaked daze, I noticed a car with an official Missouri State Senate license plate, and chuckled. Small world.

For the past year, KBIA has been working on a special long-form story about a place in Northeast Missouri called Heartland. It’s a story with threads of religion, law, business, and morality that all end in a knot, in the middle of a cornfield.

    


Down 7-3 in the eighth inning of the American League Wild Card game, it seemed inevitable, even fitting, really. The Kansas City Royals waited 29 years to return to the postseason, only to be swept out in a one-game wild card playoff that has only existed for three years. The loss would have cut deep, like they always have in Kansas City. At least that I can remember.

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