Travis McMillen

Video Producer

TRAVIS McMILLEN is the video producer for the Futures Lab, located on the lower level of the Reynolds Journalism Institute. As video producer, McMillen directs and produces regular and occasional programming from RJI’s own production studio, including KBIA-FM’s Views of the News, Global Journalist and Radio Friends with Paul Pepper. He is a Columbia native who started working at KOMU-TV, the University of Missouri’s NBC affiliate, at the age of 16. At 18 McMillen became the audio operator for Pepper and Friends, a community variety and talk show that aired on KOMU for 27 years. It was a position he held for almost 10 years. Aside from audio, McMillen’s duties on the show included field segment videographer and editor and, from 2001-2007, primary fill-in director. McMillen also directed KOMU’s daily two-hour morning newscast from 2001-2008. He is married to Jennifer, whom he met at KOMU. She currently produces the CW News at Nine for the station. They have three boys.

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What does it mean when President Donald Trump only calls on reporters from publications owned by buddy Rupert Murdoch? And, the next day, calls on two more from right-leaning organizations? Also, Sean Spicer draws in the daytime TV audience, Playboy goes back to its old playbook with a return to nude photos, Bob Costas steps aside, making way for Mike Tirico to host NBC’s primetime Olympic programming. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?” Also, Bill O’Reilly’s reaction to criticism from the Kremlin, how fake news is creating a chilling effect on satirists, and what to expect from Snapchat after its parent company goes public. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Reporters were working overtime this weekend, covering the fallout from President Trump’s executive order limiting travel from seven countries. Also, journalists’ response to Steve Bannon’s call to keep its mouth shut and listen more, how George Orwell’s 1984 became required reading outside the high school literature classes and our memories of Mary Tyler Moore. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Alternative facts. A slip of the tongue? Or just one more symbol of the relationship between the reporters and the Trump administration? Also, what’s behind a directive to workers at some federal agencies to cut communication with Congress, reporters and public, why newsroom staffers across the country get marching orders to stay home from the Women’s Marches held across the country, and a look at this year’s Oscar nominations.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal? Also, Facebook’s newest effort to filter fake news, the ice storm that wasn’t, and 65 years of morning television. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, John Fennell and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

News broke on Tuesday that Megyn Kelly would be leaving Fox News for NBC News in a deal reportedly worth upwards of $20 million per year. This week on Views of the News, our panel will discuss if her new role is worth the investment. Also, Don Lemon partied extra hard during CNN’s New Year’s Eve coverage – will it have lasting damage? And what role will fake news play in 2017 after Trump becomes president? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base. Also, Trump’s on-going role on NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice, reading the tea leaves on media cross-ownership and a look at a generation of children growing up on YouTube. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

More than 35 people died in Friday night’s Oakland, Calif. warehouse fire. A distraught Derick Almena, the building’s landlord, appeared on The Today Show Tuesday hoping to apologize to the public. But, the interview took a quick turn when the co-hosts asked some pointed questions. Were they too hard on him? Or, where they asking the same questions investigators would likely ask? Also, the impact of fake news on private citizens, a CNN field producer is caught on tape making inappropriate jokes about President-elect Donald Trump. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag. Also, covering the death Fidel Castro and some pretty shallow coverage of the standoff at the Standing Rock Reservation. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

We’re learning the names of some of President-elect Trump’s first appointments. How should the news media cover those? And, when do you use terms like “alt-right” versus “white nationalist?” Also, Mark Zuckerberg’s response to the notion the spread of fake news on Facebook affected the outcome of the election, nonprofit news organizations see a rush of donations, and the death of Gwen Ifill. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Forget the pollsters, forget the prognosticators, forget the pundits.

They were all wrong.

Now that the election is behind us, our panel breaks down what happened in America’s newsrooms – how the coverage came together and where so many natural storylines were dropped. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

After a few tough weeks for Donald Trump and his campaign, we’ll look at a few issues that have put a thorn in Hillary Clinton’s side. Also, the exchange between Megyn Kelly and Newt Gingrich, Gannett drops its bid for Tronc, racist advertising practices on Facebook and the end of Twitter’s Vine. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Rod Gelatt and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Today Paul Pepper visits with ANDREW GRABAU, Executive Director of the Heart of Missouri United Way, about their latest community campaign. Last year's efforts came up just short of it's $3M goal. Why donate? Andrew says because United Way "provides unduplicated service to help those in poverty across our community, because poverty is a complex problem." At [4:29] University of Missouri School of Music professors STEVEN THARP and NEIL MINTURN invite everyone to Talking Horse Theatre for "An Evening of Cabaret." If you're a fan Gershwin and jazz standards, don't miss this one-night-only performance/fundraiser - watch for details! September 29, 2016

Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations? Also, we’ll break down the first presidential debate, the coverage, the focus on fact-checking and Lester Holt’s performance as moderator. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden? Also, have we seen the end of the birther movement, Megyn Kelly’s new role of producer,and how a journalist’s skills could be used to teach life skills.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

It's been two months since former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed her sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News. Now, the network has announced a settlement – and it’s disclosing the details. Also, what’s the role of a debate moderator and the shortest story in the history of the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

  The Associated Press reports that more than half of the meetings Hillary Clinton held during her time as Secretary of State were with parties who donated to the Clinton Foundation. Is their analysis an accurate representation of the data? Also, what happened when Facebook dropped its Trending Topics team, a USA Today report that gives some credence to Ryan Lochte’s story and a career development initiative designed to bring diverse candidates to newsrooms across the country. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

For years, WikiLeaks has been known for it’s crusade against government secrecy. But, the Associated Press reports that innocent, private citizens have had very personal information published online. Why would the agency publish medical record, name child rape victims or out gay men in Saudi Arabia? Also, another major shakeup in the Trump campaign, the end of Gawker, and Ryan Lochte’s fall from grace. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

John Oliver summed it up succinctly on Sunday night’s episode of Last Week Tonight, “the media is a food chain which would fall apart without local newspapers.” We’ll talk about Oliver’s harsh words for the content creators and why so many reporters and editors are cheering him on. Also, a look of the best –and the worst – of the coverage of the Olympic games in Rio and Fox News after Roger Ailes. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


The Hill, The Atlantic and POLITICO are among the news organizations offering sponsorship opportunities for events at the Republican and Democratic National Conventions later this month. In many cases, special interests are footing the bill. Is it a conflict of interest or creative way to create and alternative revenue stream… or both? Also, the influence ‘Serial’ might have had in getting Adnan Syed a new trial, why PBS used video from a past fireworks show Monday night, and how Facebook’s new algorithm may hurt publishers. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski is CNN’s newest political analyst, offering insight and analysis into his former employer. Why did the cable network plop down $500,000 to bring him on board? How will non-disclosure agreements affect his ability to offer insights? And, does that hurt CNN’s credibility? Also, live streaming the House sit-in using social media apps, covering the Brexit vote and a reporter’s undercover reporting inside a for-profit prison. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

As with so many mass shootings in this country, the events at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub raised many questions about access to guns, terrorism, radicalized Islam – and homophobia. But now critics are questioning whether a journalist’s sexual orientation or gender identity may influence their ability to cover the story fairly. Is that criticism fair? Also, the FAA relaxes regulations on commercial drone use, Disney’s coverage of Disney, and Donald Trump’s decision to pull the Washington Post’s credentials. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Did Hillary Clinton clinch the nomination for president on Monday? Some media outlets say she did. Others say not quite. Why the confusion? BuzzFeed turns down $1.3 million in advertising from the Republican Committee over Donald Trump. Also, Tribune Publishing becomes tronc and Ken Starr’s bizarre television moment. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mark Hinojosa: Views of the News.

It took him nearly a decade, but Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel has found a way to get revenge on Gawker Media for outing him: secretly bankroll defamation lawsuits to drive it out of business. He financed Hulk Hogan’s case to the tune of $10 million and is said to be behind other celebrity lawsuits, too. Also, whether an editor’s decision discredits Katie Couric’s gun safety documentary, Donald Trump spars with reporters, and the debut of cable television’s ‘Roots’ reboot. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Nine out of 10 Native Americans say they support the use of the name “Redskins” for the Washington NFL franchise, according to a Washington Post poll of approximately 500 people. What prompted the paper to commission such a poll? And, how is the team’s ownership using it to further his own political purposes? Also, St. Louis County drops the trespassing charges against two journalists arrested in Ferguson, the latest in the negotiations between Tribune Publishing and Gannett and the saga of Sumner Redstone and control of Viacom.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The woman at the center of the New York Times’ story about Donald Trump’s treatment of women has her words were taken out of context, and Trump wants everyone to know it. Also, why a “little black dress” made headlines in Los Angeles and the debate as to whether ‘This American Life’ producer Ira Glass has forgotten the mission of public radio. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics. Also, why an editorial cartoonist lost his job at an Iowa farm publication, how an ex-Obama administration official “sold” the media on the Iran deal, and a quick death for London’s newest newspaper. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

You’d never say that to someone’s face, so why do people think it’s okay to tweet vile threats to journalists? On this week’s show, we’ll look at the #MoreThanMean campaign and how two female sports journalists hope to change the narrative. Also, who was Larry Wilmore really roasting at Saturday’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner, GQ’s profile of Melania Trump, an whether Arianna Huffington can strike a balance between her business and editorial roles. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

After years of shedding debt, what prompted Gannett to make a hostile bid for Tribune Publishing? We’ll look at the $815 million deal, what it might mean for news consumers and why the Tribune executives are fighting it. Also, Prince’s imprint on the record industry, why Kelly Ripa took a few days off from her ABC syndicated show, and cutting commercials from “Saturday Night Live” to keep an engaged audience. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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