Travis McMillen

Video Producer

TRAVIS McMILLEN is the video producer for the Futures Lab, located on the lower level of the Reynolds Journalism Institute. As video producer, McMillen directs and produces regular and occasional programming from RJI’s own production studio, including KBIA-FM’s Views of the News, Global Journalist and Radio Friends with Paul Pepper. He is a Columbia native who started working at KOMU-TV, the University of Missouri’s NBC affiliate, at the age of 16. At 18 McMillen became the audio operator for Pepper and Friends, a community variety and talk show that aired on KOMU for 27 years. It was a position he held for almost 10 years. Aside from audio, McMillen’s duties on the show included field segment videographer and editor and, from 2001-2007, primary fill-in director. McMillen also directed KOMU’s daily two-hour morning newscast from 2001-2008. He is married to Jennifer, whom he met at KOMU. She currently produces the CW News at Nine for the station. They have three boys.

Ways To Connect

  Who is to blame for the journalism malpractice at Rolling Stone? The reporter? The editors? The fact-checkers? Jackie? Columbia Journalism School’s report into to “A Rape On Campus” is out, and it’s scathing. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean will talk about how it happened, why it happened and what can be done to prevent it from happening again.


    

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts. Also, the media lockout at a law school event featuring St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch, how newsroom diversity affects workplace culture, the Colorado Springs Gazette’s editorial project, Clearing the Haze. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

  Robert Durst, the focus of HBO’s ‘The Jinx’ docuseries, is now under arrest and charged with murder in the 2000 homicide of Susan Berman. How role did filmmakers Andrew Jarecki and Marc Smeling play in cracking the case? And, how likely is it the statements they recorded will be admissible in court? Also, a partnership between Starbucks and USA Today attempts to drive a nationwide discussion on race, the Obama administration deletes a rule obligating part of it from the Freedom of Information Act, and whether TIME Magazine gave Hillary Clinton horns on its latest cover. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

  Hillary Clinton said she used a personal address while Secretary of State as a manner of convenience, so that she wouldn't need to carry more than one mobile device. It’s an explanation that drew skepticism at Tuesday’s news conference. Also, tech blog Gigaom goes belly up, how you can access HBO without a cable subscription, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Selma march and why a television news reporter decided to thank a public information officer on the air. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


  What’s the appropriate way for the news media to cover a suicide? Last week, when Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, it was front-page news. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch released a voicemail Schweich left for Editorial Page Editor Tony Messenger moments before firing the shot. Was publishing a violation of Shweich’s privacy or in the best interest of the public?  Also, Hillary Clinton’s private email address, and update on new allegations against Bill O’Reilly, unmasking ‘Jihadi John’ and how BuzzFeed nearly broke the internet with #TheDress. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Judd Slivka: Views of the News.


  Did Bill O’Reilly lie about his experiences reporting during the Falklands War? A story in Mother Jones claims the Fox News Channel host lied about his whereabouts during coverage of the 1982 conflict for CBS News.  We’ll talk about what former colleagues say about that time and what O’Reilly is saying about it.  Also, editors at the New York Times drop the legendary Page One meetings, why the Toronto Star backed off its reporting on the HPV vaccine and the job outlook for journalism graduates. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Judd Slivka: Views of the News.


  The past week was a shock for many journalists: the sudden deaths of CBS correspondent Bob Simon and New York Times media columnist David Carr, the fallout from Brian Williams suspension and Jon Stewart’s impending departure from “The Daily Show.” What have we lost and what will we most remember? Also, clues from the FAA on how it will regulate the use of drones, why we still televise car chases live, and 40 years of “Saturday Night Live.” From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.


  NBC’s Brian Williams’ apology wasn’t enough to keep the network from suspending him for six months without pay. What’s likely to happen come August? Will he return to anchor Nightly News, or move on? Some journalists are standing by Williams while others say his credibility is shot, and he’s dragging NBC News down with him. Why does it seem some broadcast journalists are more understanding while print and online journalists aren’t cutting Williams any slack? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


The measles outbreak and the debate over childhood vaccinations turns political. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) told CNBC’s Kelly Evans he’s heard of cases in which vaccines have caused “profound mental disorders.” Also, why President Obama is urging House Democrats to avoid the Huffington Post, the motivation behind Newsweek’s provocative cover on sexism in Silicon Valley, journalist Peter Greste is freed from an Egyptian prison, and the best of the worst of the Super Bowl ads. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Parts of the east coast were clobbered by more than two feet of snow.  But is it a national story or a regional one? From live reporters up to their waists in fallen snow to the CNN Blizzardmobile driving around during a statewide travel ban, we’ll break down the coverage. Indiana’s governor announces plans for a new state-run news agency, drawing criticism from journalists comparing it to North Korea and the former Soviet Union, why a gangster rapper’s lyrics could land him 25 years to life in prison, and a look ahead at Sunday’s Super Bowl telecast. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


It’s been more than a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out its first edition, again with a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the cover.  Who is republishing the cartoons? Who isn’t? Is it possible to give this story context without using it? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.


  A gunman targets Paris weekly Charlie Hebdo known for satirizing Islam and the prophet Mohammed.  Also, a preview of the legislative session now underway in Jefferson City, why Kirby Delauter doesn’t want his name in the press,  the historical accuracy of the film Selma, and remembering ESPN’s Stuart Scott.  From the Missouri School of Journalism, Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Bob Priddy: Views of the News.


Welcome to 2015! Today Paul Pepper and HEATHER HARLAN, Phoenix Health Programs, Inc., kick off the new year by reviewing Heather's "ABCs of Family Support" for those suffering from a chronic health issue. January 1, 2015

  Are the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques torture? Former Vice President Dick Cheney gives Chuck Todd his definition of “torture” on Meet the Press. The Cosbys break their silence, MSNBC launches “The Shift” to test new programming online, and New York Magazine is duped by a high school student. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Chris Rock tells New York magazine that white people are “less crazy than they used to be.” Why the actor-comedian’s remarks about race, Ferguson and President Obama are giving many reasons for pause. Janay Rice steadfastly stands behind her husband in interviews with ESPN and NBC, evidence suggests North Korea could be behind a computer hack that resulted in the leak of several new Sony Pictures movies, and why a New York Times movie review might have you thinking of math in a new light. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


NPR’s Scott Simon asked Bill Cosby some pointed questions about allegations waged against him, but were the questions about sexual assault allegations or something else?  An Uber executive unhappy about media coverage looks to dig up dirt on unfriendly journalists, the Orange County Register looks to reporters to take on paper delivery routes and why an Australian television anchor’s decision to wear the same suit every day for a year is earning him high praise from feminists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

 President Barack Obama challenges the FCC to regulate the internet service providers as it would a utility.  A win for net neutrality advocates and businesses such as Netflix and Hulu or a long-shot wish put upon an independent agency? Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck reveals he is suffering from a rare illness that has “quite honestly, made me look crazy.” Stephen Glass breaks his silence. And, how close to reality is Jake Gyllenhaal’s new flim Nightcrawler? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jim Flink and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.

 

  Did the police call for a no-fly zone over Ferguson to keep the media out?  Find out what's on the Federal Aviation Administration recordings released by the Associated Press.  KBIA announces plans to go all-news all day with the purchase of another FM frequency, analysis of the midterm election coverage and a tribute to Car Talk’s Tom Magliozzi. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

  Were a forensic expert’s opinions taken out of context in the reporting of the findings of Michael Brown’s autopsy? Nearly a week after publication, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed a clarification of Dr. Judy Melinek’s interpretation of the report. Documents show the FBI co-opted the Seattle Times website to capture a teen suspected of bomb threats at a high school, why pressure from a gubernatorial candidate led to a Chicago Sun-Times reporter’s resignation and what sets apart breaking news coverage in Canada. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Gov. Jay Nixon announces the creation of the Ferguson Commission to study the social and education conditions that led to the shooting death of Michael Brown. Why is the governor doing this now? Also, how the media covered the Keene, New Hampshire Pumpkin Fest unrest, a battle between the National Association of Black Journalists and CNN, the Associated Press runs advertising through its Twitter account and claims a gubernatorial candidate sidelined a political reporter. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

Do you want to know about every person tested for Ebola or hear about every airline passenger with a fever? Has the media’s attempts to localize the Ebola epidemic gone too far, resulting in the reporting of “non-stories?” New Jersey puts NBC Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Synderman under a mandatory quarantine after she was spotted picking up soup from her favorite restaurant. Speculation swirls after North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un reappears after 40 days without a trace and the New York Times says it’s time to end the trade embargo against Cuba – in Spanish. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

    The Ebola outbreak hits American soil.  A photojournalist working for NBC News is treated for the illness while his colleagues are in a self-imposed quarantine.  Did the Liberian man doctors diagnosed in Dallas have an expectation of privacy? Or should the media have broadcast his name far and wide?    Daily Show alum John Oliver says he’s not a journalist, but many journalists disagree. Find out why his brand of investigative reporting is getting the industry’s attention. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jim Flink and Jamie Greber: Views of the News.

  Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards. How do you keep the trolls from invading your news site’s smart, open dialogue? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: a special edition of Views of the News.


    

  Advertisers are starting to feel pressure to drop their NFL sponsorships in light of how the league is handling domestic abuse cases. What role has the news media played in that?  Also, the Columbia Missourian fact-checks the “Mizzou Made” commercial, and some emotional moments in local television news. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

The Baltimore Ravens cut Ray Rice after TMZ releases graphic video of him assaulting his now-wife in a hotel elevator, six months after the incident. How did media pressure play into the decision? NBC re-launches “Meet the Press” with Chuck Todd at the helm, Bloomberg News fails to cover the return of it’s CEO, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and why another new reporting fellowship the Huffington Post has some journalism purists raising an eyebrow. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Video claims to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff.  How big of a gaffe was it when President Barack Obama said he doesn’t “have a strategy yet” for dealing with ISIS in Syria? Should reporters name names when saying they’ve experienced boorish behavior at the hands of U.S. senators? And, the steps the St. Louis media is taking to keep the story of Ferguson on the front page. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

An editorial cartoon in the Columbia Daily Tribune sparks cries of racism from readers, the Huffington Post names a new “Ferguson Fellow” to spend a year looking into how the St. Louis County police department got its military-grade equipment, and a young journalist speaks out on why it’s time step out of Ferguson and let the region heal.  Also, how Facebook comments led a cops reporter to quit and a police chief to lose his job, why CNN will soon be doing less with less and ESPN’s reporting on Michael Sam’s shower habits. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

More than a ten journalists have been arrested, dozens more tear gassed trying to cover the violence in Ferguson, Missouri.  Governor Jay Nixon lost control of a nationally televised news conference, and cable news anchors turn into advocates on-screen.  What role is the media playing in the continuing conflict? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Police in Ferguson, Missouri shot and killed an unarmed teen.  Was race a factor in the death of Michael Brown? Or has the framing of the story by local and national journalists made it one?  Also, keeping reporters safe during violent protests, the role of citizen journalists and hashtag activism in the aftermath. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: Views of the News.


Strange theories abound following the shootdown of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. What impact is that having on the people of Russia? Rupert Murdoch makes a bid for Time Warner. What does that mean for the future of corporate media? And Jill Abramson has been making the rounds, speaking with several prominent women journalists, but have they been going easy on her? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Judd Slivka and Stacey Woelfel discuss these issues and more on this edition of Views of the News.

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