Trevor Harris

Announcer

Trevor serves as KBIA’s weekday morning host for classical music. He has been involved with local radio since 1990, when he began volunteering as a music and news programmer at KOPN, Columbia's community radio station. Before joining KBIA, Trevor studied social work at Mizzou and earned a masters degree in geography at the University of Alabama. He has worked in community development and in urban and bicycle/pedestrian planning, and recently served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia with his wife, Lisa Groshong. An avid bicycle commuter and jazz fan, Trevor has cycled as far as Colorado and pawed through record bins in three continents.

Ways to Connect

Missouri Department of Conservation

Spend much time near a Missouri waterbody in summer, and chances are you’ll spot see reptiles galore including water snakes basking on a sunny day.

TinyHouseExpedition.com

A new history of the Ozark's Baldknobbers is out. KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with the book's author and took a look at the tiny home movement on Thinking Out Loud.


Thinking Out Loud: Making Waves

Jun 14, 2016
Kelsey Kupferer / Making Waves

Radio can be a powerful medium for storytelling. Just ask a group of students at Columbia's Rock Bridge High School.


Missouri Department of Conservation

If you’ve spent any time out in nature in the last week you may have noticed a well-protected reddish fruit starting to ripen now. This week on Discover Nature, we search for wild raspberries.

Jim Rathert / Missouri Department of Conservation

What do fawnfoot, monkey face and fat pocketbook all have in common? They are a few of the fun names of Missouri’s 69 freshwater mussel species.

Missouri Department of Conservation

So much in the natural world is ephemeral especially in the spring. This week on Discover Nature we look and listen for buzzing signs of the season.


Trevor Harris / KBIA

Twenty years ago, when Milton Rafferty republished Henry Rowe Schooclraft's 1820 Ozarks journal, Rafferty introduced the explorer Schooclraft to a new generation of scholars. Schoolcraft's journal is unique in that he describes flora and fauna in the pre-statehood Missouri Territory in a way that no one else had to date.


Missouri Department of Conservation

As you hit the road this spring, keep an eye out for Missouri residents at special risk this time of year:  this week on Discover Nature, we hit the brakes for turtles on the move.

The State Historical Society of Missouri

In 1818, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft walked across the Ozarks. His curiosity and search for lead deposits are what drove him and travel companion Levi Pettibone to cover almost 900 miles in 90 days. Schoolcraft's journal recounted intact landscapes largely unmolested by humans. A new KBIA series looks at Schoolcraft's changing landscapes.


Missouri Department of Conservation

There are almost 1,000 different kinds of bats. Bats eat mostly insects, but when insects are not available during winter, bats in Missouri survive our colder months by hibernating or migrating to warmer places. 

Alycia McGee / Cancer Research Center

On a recent Thinking out Loud, Darren Hellwege visited with Jack Bozarth and Alison Fea from Columbia's Cancer Research Center about the work that group is doing to better understand cancer.

  

This program originally aired April 5, 2016.

Listen for new episodes of Thinking Out Loud each Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. on KBIA.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Spring weather settling-in across Missouri triggers breeding activities for many frogs.  This week on Discover Nature, we’ll learn about the Boreal Chorus Frog. 

Listen in prairies, and along the grassy edges of marshes and farm ponds, for these small gray or tan frogs – three-quarters to one-and-a-half inches long – with three wide stripes down the back.  They begin breeding in late February, with their raspy, vibrating call peaking in mid-April – a sound similar to running a fingernail over the teeth of a pocket comb. 

Thomas Jefferson scholar Peter Onuf visited with KBIA's Darren Hellwege in advance of his visit to Columbia. Onuf is a regular contributor to BackStory as one of The History Guys.

Also on this week's program Darren talked with Columbian Nanette Ward about an April 22 event Freedom From Fashion that is a benefit for Ward's group, the Central Missouri Stop Human Trafficking Coalition.

This program was originally broadcast on March 29, 2016.

Listen for new episodes of Thinking Out Loud each Tuesday evening at 6:30 on KBIA 91.3FM.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

On this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege visited with City of Columbia Volunteer Coordinator Leigh Contwitz about the upcoming Clean-Up Columbia event and other volunteer opportunities. Trevor Harris also filed a story from the James Apartments about a local group working to salvage architectural elements from the 1903 structure before its planned demolition.

Boone County Historical Society

If you ever visited Columbia's former Boone Tavern restaurant, you may have seen the many photos that lined the walls of the former downtown eatery. These images of historic Columbia, represent the photo collection assembled over many years by former restaurant owner Dick Walls. When Bleu Restaurant took over the space three years ago, the pictures of parades on brick streets and MU student revelry didn't really fit the new restaurant's aesthetic.

CCUA / Facebook

This time of year is especially exciting to everyone - gardeners and non-gardeners alike. That’s because we’ve more or less been cooped up inside all winter, and are as ready as ever to bust out of the back door and do something, anything outside.

The State Historical Society of Missouri

Almost 200 years ago, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft and his travel companion Levi Pettibone set off on a walk. In the winter of 1818-1819, the two men walked and rode on horseback across 900 miles of hills and grasslands in what would soon become the state of Missouri. The landscapes they saw are - depending on who you talk with - either radically altered or barely changed.

Anna Soulstice / Facebook

On this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talks with a pair of Mid-Missouri musicians. We have in-studio performances from Boonville country singer Tanner Lee and Columbia singer-songwriter Anna Soulstice. Also on this week's program, we have a preview of this Sunday's Wild and Scenic Film Festival.


Missouri River Relief

Missouri River Relief is a Columbia-based non-profit that has made a name for itself using volunteers to clean up trash - lots of trash - along the Big Muddy. Late last year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded the group an Environmental Education Grant. River relief staff Kristen Schulte and Steve Schnarr discussed plans for the award on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

Increasingly, sound is providing scientists with clues about changes in habitat. On this episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talks with Christopher Bobryk, a Columbia-based soil scientist with the USDA who uses sound to measure habitat. He visited with Darren about the growing field of soundscape ecology.


Farm Your Yard - Is it a Fruit or a Vegetable?

Jan 12, 2016
Carrie Hargrove / CCUA

Happy New Year! 2016 is going to be a great gardening year, I can feel it in my bones. Over the holiday season, I, like most folks, spent lots of time with family. It was a great time to get together, joke, eat things we shouldn’t and watch plenty of Netflix. And, being the resident plant nerd of both mine and my husband’s family, I got asked a few questions about basic botany.

Farm Your Yard: Insects That Farm

Dec 28, 2015
Flickr / Michael Jagendorf

This installment of Farm Your Yard originally aired November 3, 2015.

Halloween 2015 is becoming a distant memory. I am not ready, however, to let go of telling spooky scary stories, so I’ve got one for you today. To most people, the spookiest thing about organic gardening are those weird, bloodless, six legged, multi-eyed creatures who go creeping around your cherry tomatoes all season long. I am talking about bugs.


Scott Peterson

In the second part of this two-part episode of Thinking Out Loud, Darren Hellwege talks with Tony Lotvin, David Dearnley, Jeff Wheeler and Debra Hardin about "Love Matters." The new CD is a compilation from Debra and a group of Columbia-area musicians.

NPR

To get (or keep) you in the holiday spirit, KBIA 91.3 and Classical 90.5 have programs for all musical and cultural tastes. Here's our list of remaining holiday programs planned for both stations.

Jeff Wheeler

Tonight on Thinking Out Loud, Darren visits with Debra Hardin, the writer and inspiration behind the CD Love Matters, which will be released at an event at the Blue Note in Columbia on Friday, Dec. 18. The project blends Hardin’s poetry with a symphony created by local musicians. It was conceived during a time of poor health for Hardin, who has cancer, and at one point was expected to be a tribute to her after her passing. Instead, she expects to participate in the debut.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Columbia's Business Loop 70 has been in the news a lot lately. A group of property owners along the roadway have gathered in an attempt to improve the aging commercial corridor. Before the road was called Business Loop 70, it was U.S. Highway 40. In a recent episode of KBIA's Thinking Out Loud, Trevor Harris spoke to a trio of Columbians about their memories of businesses along Old Highway 40.


Terry Neason / Facebook

When we collect oral histories, we do future generations a favor. Recordings of those who lived through a major event can help us understand how life was during an earlier, different era. On this episode of KBIA's Thinking Out Loud, we hear from a pair of veterans who served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War era.


WBUR

As you may have heard, KBIA will soon change formats. Within the week, we expect  to launch a new station where classical music can play 24-7. Soon thereafter, KBIA will change sounds. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, Darren Hellwege explores what our new format means for the sounds emanating from your radio.  

Here at KBIA, we've been talking for years about how we best meet listeners' needs. The new station at 90.5 will be a full-time classical music station. This frees up KBIA to serve up more news and information programs.

ToroYMoi.com

Toro Y Moi is considered a pioneer in the Chillwave genre, which combines elements of hip-hop and indie rock. Chaz Bundick is the brains behind a sound that has shifted with every new release. Toro Y Moi is touring behind his new release and performs a show at The Blue Note in Columbia this evening.

Western Historical Manuscripts Collection

Chances are that if you studied English at the University of Missouri any time between the late 1950's and early 1980's, you met Thomas McAfee. A group of his former students are celebrating the late professor of poetry with a reissue of his poems.


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