Trevor Harris

Announcer

Trevor serves as KBIA’s weekday morning host for classical music. He has been involved with local radio since 1990, when he began volunteering as a music and news programmer at KOPN, Columbia's community radio station. Before joining KBIA, Trevor studied social work at Mizzou and earned a masters degree in geography at the University of Alabama. He has worked in community development and in urban and bicycle/pedestrian planning, and recently served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia with his wife, Lisa Groshong. An avid bicycle commuter and jazz fan, Trevor has cycled as far as Colorado and pawed through record bins in three continents.

Ways to Connect

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, voles - also called meadow mice - are busy working through the winter under snow and soil.

Missouri Department of Conservation

While cruising down a Missouri highway this winter, keep an eye out for a predator on the prowl.


Jim Gossage

Before he was a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Lanford Wilson grew up in Southwest Missouri. On a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with Dr. David Crespy. The University Press recently published MU Department of Theater professor Crespy's collection of Wilson's early works. Crespy explained why Wilson donated his papers to MU Ellis Libraries' Special Collections. He also detailed what life was like for the young playwright Wilson and read excerpts from the new collection, Lanford Wilson: Early Stories, Sketches, and Poems.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

What if you had no way to get around town? Life would be quite different without a clear path for how to get to your workplace, meet shopping needs and even to socialize.

On a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud, we looked at a new Columbia program that puts bicycles under those most in need of transportation. We hear from a trio of people who each have a unique take on Bike to the Future.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This winter, consider a style of hunting that doesn’t require any special equipment, and has no bag limit. This week on Discover Nature, head outdoors in search of deer sheds.


Missouri Department of Conservation

The holiday season continues, but as we enter the new year and Christmas trees come down, consider giving one more gift: to nature.

Southside Philharmonic Orchestra / Facebook

A recent episode of Thinking Out Loud featured a pair of previews of upcoming holiday performances in Mid-Missouri. We look ahead to Jefferson City's Southside Philharmonic Orchestra's weekend performances of the Nutcracker and the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre's ongoing staging of A Christmas Carol.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, watch for an ecological engineer, and unsung steward of streams.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri’s resident and migratory bald eagle populations peak in the winter, and now is a great time to look for these iconic American raptors.


Missouri Department of Conservation

As colder air moves into Missouri this week, keep an eye to the sky for honking flocks of snow geese.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Now that most leaves have fallen from Missouri’s trees, look for the smooth, white limbs of a giant rising over streams and river banks: Discover Nature this week with the American Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis).

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, we give thanks, and recognize the king of North American game birds.

Rodale's Organic Life

A few weeks ago I was poking around in out what I call the “back 40” of my garden. This is the part of my garden, for better or worse, where I kinda just plant something and then forget about it for the rest of the year.

Kinder Center for Constitutional Democracy

Jay Sexton is a professor of history at the University of Missouri and the Kinder Center chair of Constitutional Democracy. The historian visited with KBIA's Darren Hellwege about the ways history is taught, Sexton's upcoming study abroad trip to Oxford University, and his forthcoming book on the past, present and future of American democracy.


Missouri Department of Conservation

As days get shorter and temperatures drop, Missouri’s black bears are entering dens to spend the winter months when food supplies are scarce.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, watch for white-tailed deer in rut.

Darren Hellwege / KBIA

Much has come from the November 2015 protests here at MU. One upcoming series of discussions on race will occur in a new course that begins in January. A pair of MU faculty who developed the course 'Race and the American Story' were guests on this week's Thinking Out Loud.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, listen for the eerie calls of bobcats in the wild.

Missouri Department of Conservation

As warm days grow farther apart, waves of colder air sweep across the state, bringing wind and rain that chill the blaze of autumn leaves.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, watch for spiders spinning silken webs, and “ballooning.”

MoreSource / Facebook

Area businesses are working to be more inclusive of those with disabilities. On this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with a local business leader and economic developer at MU about creating meaningful work for those with different abilities.


Missouri Department of Conservation

As autumn begins in Missouri, one of the state’s most fragile and unique species is active beneath the surface of some streams.

Penguin Publishing Group

Authors Andrew Carroll and Paul Hockenos are in Columbia in the next week to promote their latest publications. KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with both writers for this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud. 


Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature keep your eyes peeled around dusk for groups of little brown bats.


Missouri Department of Conservation

Celebrate the arrival of autumn this week, and watch for a variety of ripening tree nuts falling to the ground.

Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture

I love this time of year: the leaves on the trees are just beginning to change, the nights and mornings are cooler, and my summer vegetable garden is starting to slow down. Lots of non-gardeners think that September is the harvest month. That is true, but if you have an intensively planted garden like I do, May, June, July, and August are also the harvest months.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, get outside to enjoy early autumn weather, and keep an eye out for the first signs of fall color.


Missouri Department of Conservation

Discover Nature this week as the American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) prepares for winter.


Shane Epping / Missouri Traditional Fiddle and Dance Network

Howard Marshall's latest book Fiddler's Dream: Old-Time, Swing, and Bluegrass Fiddling in Twentieth-Century Missouri is a look at Missouri's contributions to the history of bluegrass and fiddle music. KBIA's Darren Hellwege interviewed Marshall for a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Last week, our longtime KBIA colleague Pat Akers retired after 30 years of service to KBIA. Before he cruised off into the sunset, Pat sat down to reflect on the changes he has seen in radio during his KBIA career.

Pages