Trevor Harris


Trevor serves as KBIA’s weekday morning host for classical music. He has been involved with local radio since 1990, when he began volunteering as a music and news programmer at KOPN, Columbia's community radio station. Before joining KBIA, Trevor studied social work at Mizzou and earned a masters degree in geography at the University of Alabama. He has worked in community development and in urban and bicycle/pedestrian planning, and recently served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia with his wife, Lisa Groshong. An avid bicycle commuter and jazz fan, Trevor has cycled as far as Colorado and pawed through record bins in three continents.

Ways to Connect

Nicholas Rodriguez

Tonight on Thinking Out Loud, Darren Hellwege talks with Nicholas Rodriguez, also known as NicDanger, about his new E.P. and his career in hip-hop and rap music. Also, Doug Wilson previews this weekend’s Central Missouri Renaissance Festival in Callaway County.

This week on Discover Nature, watch for spiders spinning silken webs, and “ballooning.”

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Head south down Providence Road until you reach Old Plank Road. Turn left and head all the way down to the Missouri River. That's where you'll find Churchill Clark at work. The woodcarver and descendent of William Clark is working on a pair of dugout canoes. The canoes are available for a trade. Clark explains in a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, we’ll look for one of Missouri’s late-blooming native wildflowers. 

Farm Your Yard: Preserving the Season's Harvest

Oct 9, 2016
Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture / Facebook

Carrie Hargrove and her fellow urban farmers are busy putting up the season's harvest. On this installment of Farm Your Yard, she shares her tips for preserving vegetables and lessons learned in six years of the Opportunity Garden program.

Missouri Department of Conservation

When people find baby snakes around their homes, they wonder, "Where did it come from? Is it poisonous? Will we find more?"

During late August, September and early October, young snakes are moving around, looking for hiding places, food or spots to hole up for the winter.  The majority of baby snakes people find are newly-hatched prairie kingsnakes, water snakes and black rat snakes, which most people call "black snakes."


University Concert Series / Facebook

Karen Jones Meadows is visiting Columbia this week for a one-woman play and a pair of workshops sponsored by the University Concert Series.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, get outside to enjoy early autumn weather, and keep an eye out for the first signs of fall color.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

As the secretary of Jefferson City's Old Munichberg Association, Walter Schroeder would regularly 'spice-up' his meeting minutes. After much encouragement from fellow members of the group, he recently published Southside Sketches, a book of memories from Jefferson City's historic German neighborhood. Schroeder was a recent guest on KBIA's Thinking Out Loud.  

Missouri Department of Conservation

“Way down yonder in the pawpaw patch” is an old song you might be familiar with, but today, surprisingly few Missourians know a pawpaw tree when they see one. This week on Discover Nature brought to you by the Missouri Department of Conservation we find the pawpaw.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Discover Nature this week as a swift-flying, migratory duck begins returning to Missouri from the north.

The blue-winged teal (Anas discors) breeds across North America, spending its summers as far north as Alaska.  These ducks leave their summer homes early to overwinter along the Gulf of Mexico, or as far south as Peru, Brazil, and Argentina.

Adult males – or drakes – are small, each with a dark gray head and a white crescent between the eye and bill.  A light blue patch adorns the fore-wing just above a greenish patch called a speculum, below.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, keep an eye to the sky in the predawn hours, as the Perseid meteor shower peaks.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Converting lawn grasses and turf into native plantings that attract pollinators and desirable wildlife is a process. An upcoming workshop at Powell Gardens is for landowners seeking to convert turf grass.

CCUA / Facebook

For the last seven years, I have spent a lot of time with rotting food. I could tell you some things that would surprise you about the decomposition of different things. For example, avocado skins just don’t break down. Neither do egg shells. Fur really doesn’t go anywhere either. And while it takes a long time to break down, bread from Panera will turn blue as it does- lots of preservatives in that one.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri’s freshwater mussels live all around us, sitting quietly in streambeds, often unnoticed despite their bright pearls and colorful names. Discover Nature this week, as the pocketbook mussel begins breeding.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Among the members of the Squirrel Family living in Missouri, you’ll most likely see Eastern gray and fox squirrels.

James Reid Lambdin / The White House Historical Association

Political conventions in American have been around as long as there has been an America. Back in 1840, members of Missouri's Whig Party made their way by land and by water to Rocheport for their state convention. The Friends of Historic Rocheport's president Sherry Moreau was Trevor Harris' guest on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

Also on this program Chris Campbell from the Boone County Historical Society discussed Boone County Votes, a show opening next month at the society's Columbia museum.

Missouri Department of Conservation

If you’ve stepped out to enjoy the night air lately, you’ve likely noticed a loud newcomer to the chorus of night sounds.  This week on Discover Nature, we’ll shine some light on the Northern True Katydid.

Central Missouri Humane Society

A mass release of plastic ducks makes for a day at the races. On a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege previewed the upcoming COMO Duck Derby, a fundraiser for the Central Missouri Humane Society.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, take a trip to a stream or pond near you, and observe the colorful dance of mating dragonflies across the surface of the water.

Richard King and Darren Hellwege looked ahead to the 2015 Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival.

Root N Blues N BBQ

Blues in the Schools is part of Columbia's annual Roots N Blues N BBQ music festival. On a recent episode of Thinking out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege visited with Richard King about the work King is doing to spread blues music to school area school children.

Getting affordable pet care to underserved pet owners is part of the new Community Outreach Program of the Central Missouri Humane Society. Executive Director Michelle Casey visited with Darren Hellwege on a recent episode of KBIA's Thinking Out Loud.

Missouri Department of Conservation

As we head into the middle of summer, keep an eye out in the woods for ripening blackberries.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Spend much time near a Missouri waterbody in summer, and chances are you’ll spot see reptiles galore including water snakes basking on a sunny day.

A new history of the Ozark's Baldknobbers is out. KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with the book's author and took a look at the tiny home movement on Thinking Out Loud.

Thinking Out Loud: Making Waves

Jun 14, 2016
Kelsey Kupferer / Making Waves

Radio can be a powerful medium for storytelling. Just ask a group of students at Columbia's Rock Bridge High School.

Missouri Department of Conservation

If you’ve spent any time out in nature in the last week you may have noticed a well-protected reddish fruit starting to ripen now. This week on Discover Nature, we search for wild raspberries.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Spring storms bring the threat of damaging wind, hail, flooding, and erosion, but they also restore life to the landscape providing nutrients to plants and soil, and drinking-water for wildlife. This week, on Discover Nature, we celebrate May as American Wetlands Month.

Jim Rathert / Missouri Department of Conservation

What do fawnfoot, monkey face and fat pocketbook all have in common? They are a few of the fun names of Missouri’s 69 freshwater mussel species.