Trevor Harris

Announcer

Trevor serves as KBIA’s weekday morning host for classical music. He has been involved with local radio since 1990, when he began volunteering as a music and news programmer at KOPN, Columbia's community radio station. Before joining KBIA, Trevor studied social work at Mizzou and earned a masters degree in geography at the University of Alabama. He has worked in community development and in urban and bicycle/pedestrian planning, and recently served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia with his wife, Lisa Groshong. An avid bicycle commuter and jazz fan, Trevor has cycled as far as Colorado and pawed through record bins in three continents.

Ways to Connect

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week, on Discover Nature, take a walk outside, and you may hear one of the first serenades signifying spring on the horizon.


KristenWilliamsDesigns.com

Kristen Williams is a Columbia native who graduated from Truman State University. During her time in Kirksville, she headed to Colorado to do an internship with that state's emerging cannabis industry. On a recent episode of Thinking out Loud, Williams was profiled about her work as a designer and as an advocate for responsible cannabis use.

Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture / Facebook

Not to toot my own horn, but I have a great backyard garden. I really can’t take much of the credit for my backyard garden because I am lucky to have amazing soil in my backyard. Without good, living soil, I wouldn’t be much of a gardener.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Eastern cottontail rabbits begin birthing their first litters of the year this week.

Each Saturday morning Darren Hellwege hosts Thinking Out Loud: Saturday Sports. The program covers University of Missouri athletics.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Boonville's Meredith Ludwig admits that once she started collecting oral histories of longtime Missouri River valley residents, she didn't want the process to end. Here are excerpts from personal histories of a pair of Missourians that Ludwig talked with back in 2004.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

In early 2016, KBIA's Trevor Harris produced a special series, The Landscapes of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft.' The series looked at the processes that have altered Missouri's landscapes in the nearly 200 years since 25-year-old Schoolcraft walked 900 miles over 90 days in search of adventure and lead mining opportunities.

Boone County Historical Society

Thinking Out Loud is a weekly program that airs Tuesday evenings at 6:30 on KBIA 91.3FM in Columbia.

Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture / Facebook

I think there’s a book out there called Everything I Really Needed to Know I Learned in Kindergarten. I think that is a great concept, and I think there could be a book written, or at least a saying that goes something like Everything I Really Needed to Know in Life I Learned From Gardening. And today on Farm your Yard, I would like to explain what I mean by that. Let’s talk about what gardening can do for you.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Since 1991, the halls of Northwest Missouri's Tarkio College have been quiet. Classes ended there 25 years ago when the college closed. Now, a group of alumni and allies are working to re-open the school. KBIA's Trevor Harris visited Tarkio College to see the grounds and gather stories from the team that is working hard to welcome a new group of scholars to the campus this fall.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Ducks and geese migrate north through Missouri as weather here warms and the season leans toward spring. Watch for Northern shovelers joining the northward flight this week.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Look skyward when traveling along Missouri’s highways and backroads and sooner or later you’ll likely see a large bird that's among the most efficient in flight. This week on Discover Nature we look for the turkey vulture.

Katz PR

This Saturday, New York City's The Acting Company bring a pair of new works to MU's Rhynsburger Theater. Marcus Gardley talked with KBIA's Trevor Harris about his work, X: Or, Betty Shabazz vs. The Nation on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, we take a look at Missouri’s cousin to the kangaroo.

Missouri Department of Conservation

In the waning weeks of winter, one of North America’s most important game fishes begins to get active in Missouri. This week on Discover Nature, walleye are on the move.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week in nature, keep an eye out for groundhogs. Also known as woodchucks, or whistle pigs, these rodents in the squirrel family are active during daylight hours, and are breeding now.

Diane Oerly

When she set out to collect the oral histories of longtime Missouri River valley residents, Boonville's Meredith Ludwig never imagined that she would end up with over 70 hours from two dozen men and women. Her histories - collected in 2004 - are archived at the State Historical Society of Missouri. KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with Ludwig about her oral histories with the late 'Mayor of Overton' Fred Oerly and Lottie Klein.

Darren Hellwege discusses Human Trafficking with Nanette Ward of Stop Human Trafficking Missouri and with Christine McDonald who has just published her second book on her own experiences as a victim of sexual trafficking, titled The Same Kind of Human: Seeing the Marginalized and Exploited through Eyes of Grace.

Missouri Department of Conservation

In the heart of winter, one Missouri shrub defies the dormant season. This week on Discover Nature, we’ll look for the Ozark witch hazel.

Missouri Department of Conservation

As temperatures freeze and thaw in late winter, one of the sweetest harvests awaits in the Missouri woods.  This week on Discover Nature, tap a tree, and collect a treat.


ReginaCarter.com

For her ninth release 'Southern Comfort', jazz violinist Regina Carter researched music of American South from the early 20th century. In a recent interview with KBIA's Trevor Harris, Carter talked about her early Detroit influences, the value of knowing your musical history and the timelessness of Ella Fitzgerald. Carter brings her 'Simply Ella' program to Columbia on Monday, January 23.

Allison Vaughn

By positioning themselves in the area's best birding areas, Allison Vaughn and Bill Mees were able to spot and count numerous bird species. Along with their fellow Columbia Audubon Society members, the duo took part in the Christmas Bird Count on December 22, 2016. Vaughn and Mees were guests on this week's Thinking Out Loud talking with KBIA's Trevor Harris about the annual count and what they saw.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This winter, consider a style of hunting that doesn’t require any special equipment, and has no bag limit. This week on Discover Nature, head outdoors in search of deer sheds.

Vellore Gopalaratnam

A nondescript cinder block building on Columbia's north side provides a space for the local Hindu community to come together for prayers, fellowship and celebrations. KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with some of those who were active in establishing the Shanthi Mandir community center.

Missouri Department of Conservation

The holiday season continues, but as we enter the new year and Christmas trees come down, consider giving one more gift – to nature. Re-using cut Christmas trees can provide great habitat for fish, birds and other wildlife.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri’s resident and migratory bald eagle populations peak in the winter, and now is a great time to look for these iconic American raptors.

Drew Piester Photography / Facebook

KBIA recently took the show on the road for a special Thinking Out Loud live from Columbia's Sager Braudis Gallery.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Did you know there are more than 200 species of woodpeckers in the world? This week on Discover Nature: look and listen for the seven species that call Missouri home.


Carrie Hargrove / CCUA

I would like to explain a photo that ran on Thanksgiving day in the Columbia Missourian. It was a picture of a group of folks, some adults, and at least one teenager who were steadily working together towards one large, and possibly overwhelming project on a local farm.

State Historical Society of Missouri

The attack on Pearl Harbor was 75 years ago last week. With fewer folks alive each year who personally remember the tragedy of December 7, 1941 now seemed like a good time to listen to some memories of and reactions to The Day of Infamy.


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