Trevor Harris

Announcer

Trevor serves as KBIA’s weekday morning host for classical music. He has been involved with local radio since 1990, when he began volunteering as a music and news programmer at KOPN, Columbia's community radio station. Before joining KBIA, Trevor studied social work at Mizzou and earned a masters degree in geography at the University of Alabama. He has worked in community development and in urban and bicycle/pedestrian planning, and recently served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia with his wife, Lisa Groshong. An avid bicycle commuter and jazz fan, Trevor has cycled as far as Colorado and pawed through record bins in three continents.

Ways to Connect

Missouri Department of Conservation

As temperatures freeze and thaw in late winter, one of the sweetest harvests awaits in the Missouri woods.  This week on Discover Nature, tap a tree, and collect a treat.


ReginaCarter.com

For her ninth release 'Southern Comfort', jazz violinist Regina Carter researched music of American South from the early 20th century. In a recent interview with KBIA's Trevor Harris, Carter talked about her early Detroit influences, the value of knowing your musical history and the timelessness of Ella Fitzgerald. Carter brings her 'Simply Ella' program to Columbia on Monday, January 23.

Allison Vaughn

By positioning themselves in the area's best birding areas, Allison Vaughn and Bill Mees were able to spot and count numerous bird species. Along with their fellow Columbia Audubon Society members, the duo took part in the Christmas Bird Count on December 22, 2016. Vaughn and Mees were guests on this week's Thinking Out Loud talking with KBIA's Trevor Harris about the annual count and what they saw.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This winter, consider a style of hunting that doesn’t require any special equipment, and has no bag limit. This week on Discover Nature, head outdoors in search of deer sheds.

Vellore Gopalaratnam

A nondescript cinder block building on Columbia's north side provides a space for the local Hindu community to come together for prayers, fellowship and celebrations. KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with some of those who were active in establishing the Shanthi Mandir community center.

Missouri Department of Conservation

The holiday season continues, but as we enter the new year and Christmas trees come down, consider giving one more gift – to nature. Re-using cut Christmas trees can provide great habitat for fish, birds and other wildlife.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri’s resident and migratory bald eagle populations peak in the winter, and now is a great time to look for these iconic American raptors.

Drew Piester Photography / Facebook

KBIA recently took the show on the road for a special Thinking Out Loud live from Columbia's Sager Braudis Gallery.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Did you know there are more than 200 species of woodpeckers in the world? This week on Discover Nature: look and listen for the seven species that call Missouri home.


Carrie Hargrove / CCUA

I would like to explain a photo that ran on Thanksgiving day in the Columbia Missourian. It was a picture of a group of folks, some adults, and at least one teenager who were steadily working together towards one large, and possibly overwhelming project on a local farm.

State Historical Society of Missouri

The attack on Pearl Harbor was 75 years ago last week. With fewer folks alive each year who personally remember the tragedy of December 7, 1941 now seemed like a good time to listen to some memories of and reactions to The Day of Infamy.


Missouri Department of Conservation

Many Americans continue the European tradition of the Christmas tree. In Europe, people used spruces and firs to decorate their homes. This week on Discover Nature we look for another Missouri evergreen: the Eastern Red Cedar.

Missouri Department of Conservation

As colder air moves into Missouri this week, keep an eye to the sky for honking flocks of snow geese.

Maples Repertory / Facebook

On last week's Thinking out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris went to Macon, Missouri. He visited with a group of Actors Equity union members there about the challenges and joys of making professional theater in small town Missouri.


Missouri Department of Conservation

On a crisp Missouri night, take a walk in the woods and listen. You’ll likely hear one of our state’s most fascinating birds.  This week on Discover Nature, listen for owls courting in the woods. 

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week, in the United States, we give thanks.  For many of us, that involves a feast with friends and family. While the turkey may take center stage on the table this year, there’s often another seasonal delicacy nearby.

Mid-Missouri Peaceworks

The 2016 holiday season is approaching. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris talked to a pair of Columbians who want you to think about the impact of your gift purchases on the lives of the people who made them.


Missouri Department of Conservation

As food sources become harder to find in the winter, birds go looking for berries, grain and seed at home feeders.

Gail E. Rowley

The white-tailed deer grabs our attention in November, perhaps more than any other animal except the thanksgiving turkey.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

From their center on North Seventh Street, The Boys & Girls Clubs of Columbia offers soccer, tutoring and other focused activities to kids who might otherwise go unsupervised after school. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, we talk with the non-profit's participants and staff. We also preview next month's play Street Stories: Glimpses of Homelessness, which is a benefit for local groups that work with unsheltered Columbians.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, watch and listen for migrating waterfowl.

Glenn Chambers / Missouri Department of Conservation

Can you name a common Missouri animal that is also one of the least visible? This week on Discover Nature we learn more about beavers.

Nicholas Rodriguez

Tonight on Thinking Out Loud, Darren Hellwege talks with Nicholas Rodriguez, also known as NicDanger, about his new E.P. and his career in hip-hop and rap music. Also, Doug Wilson previews this weekend’s Central Missouri Renaissance Festival in Callaway County.


This week on Discover Nature, watch for spiders spinning silken webs, and “ballooning.”


Trevor Harris / KBIA

Head south down Providence Road until you reach Old Plank Road. Turn left and head all the way down to the Missouri River. That's where you'll find Churchill Clark at work. The woodcarver and descendent of William Clark is working on a pair of dugout canoes. The canoes are available for a trade. Clark explains in a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, we’ll look for one of Missouri’s late-blooming native wildflowers. 

Farm Your Yard: Preserving the Season's Harvest

Oct 9, 2016
Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture / Facebook

Carrie Hargrove and her fellow urban farmers are busy putting up the season's harvest. On this installment of Farm Your Yard, she shares her tips for preserving vegetables and lessons learned in six years of the Opportunity Garden program.

Missouri Department of Conservation

When people find baby snakes around their homes, they wonder, "Where did it come from? Is it poisonous? Will we find more?"

During late August, September and early October, young snakes are moving around, looking for hiding places, food or spots to hole up for the winter.  The majority of baby snakes people find are newly-hatched prairie kingsnakes, water snakes and black rat snakes, which most people call "black snakes."

 


University Concert Series / Facebook

Karen Jones Meadows is visiting Columbia this week for a one-woman play and a pair of workshops sponsored by the University Concert Series.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, get outside to enjoy early autumn weather, and keep an eye out for the first signs of fall color.

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