Trevor Harris

Announcer

Trevor serves as KBIA’s weekday morning host for classical music. He has been involved with local radio since 1990, when he began volunteering as a music and news programmer at KOPN, Columbia's community radio station. Before joining KBIA, Trevor studied social work at Mizzou and earned a masters degree in geography at the University of Alabama. He has worked in community development and in urban and bicycle/pedestrian planning, and recently served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia with his wife, Lisa Groshong. An avid bicycle commuter and jazz fan, Trevor has cycled as far as Colorado and pawed through record bins in three continents.

Ways To Connect

Columbia Missourian

Earlier this fall, MU junior Trey Makler was named the winner of the 2015 Sinquefeld Composition Prize, an award granted to the best work by an MU School of Music composition student. On this episode of Thinking Out Loud, we talk with Makler about his creative process, with his professor about what makes the award-winning piece work, and with the director of the MU School of Music who explains how the school is teaching more these days about the business of music. You'll also hear Makler's award-winning piece 'Elysium' on this week's Thinking Out Loud.


Spelman Glee Club

The holidays are upon us. As you make your way to office parties, family gatherings and other associated year-end merriments, know that KBIA has planned a series of holiday specials for every faith persuasion (including 'None of the above'.)

KBIA

For nearly a year Dr. R. Bowen Loftin has served as the Chancellor of the University of Missouri. The chancellor and his wife Dr. Karin Loftin sat down with KBIA's Darren Hellwege recently to talk about their backgrounds and reflections on their time spent so far here in Columbia. This week's Thinking Out Loud is the first of a tw0-part broadcast interview with the Loftins.

Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture

On this installment of KBIA's gardening segment, Farm Your Yard, Carrie Hargrove tells us what to do now that will help you be the most successful with your Spring plantings.


Joyce Peng / kbiasports.org

Gender equity issues have been at the forefront of discussion on college and university campuses nationwide. How does Title IX affect the University of Missouri? On this episode of Thinking Out Loud we explore issues of gender equity in higher education. This is the first of a special two-part Thinking Out Loud. Part two airs next week at 6:30 p.m. on KBIA.

Citizen Jane Film Festival

Seen any good movies by women lately? On this episode of KBIA's Thinking Out Loud, Darren Hellwege visits with Kerri Yost of the Citizen Jane Film Festival. This annual festival shines a spotlight on the work of female  filmmakers. Darren and Kerri discuss why women get overlooked in the world of movie-making, talk about some of this year’s featured films and preview some of the other events surrounding Citizen Jane. We also hear a report from Brady Finn of KBIA News talking about the festival with Paula Elias.


Trevor Harris / KBIA

Most people are familiar with the Frisbee. We toss it around in the yard and at the park. Some people take their love of Frisbee to another level. This week on KBIA's Thinking Out Loud, Trevor Harris talks with local Ultimate players in advance of next week's major college Ultimate tournament happening here in Columbia.


Trevor Harris / KBIA

Garlic is a relatively simple crop to grow in your yard or garden. Plant it in the fall under a good cover of mulch and with a little care you'll harvest your garlic bulbs early the following summer. On this the first installment of KBIA's Farm Your Yard host Carrie Hargrove walks us through the process. Carrie is the Farm Manager for the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture.

This week on Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris visited with staff and clients of the Columbia Center for  Urban Agriculture. The non-profit celebrates the 2014 growing season with their harvest Hootenanny this Saturday.

Facebook/The Flood Brothers

This weekend Columbia's Stephen's Lake Park plays host to the eighth annual Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival. Festival Director Julie King told KBIA's Darren Hellwege to look forward to artists like John Prine, the Avett Brothers and Amos Lee. King also suggested festival-goers check out up-and-coming act Lake Street Dive performing Saturday at 4:15pm.

Facebook/Ruthie Mocchia

Have you ever been out on the Missouri River? If so, you know it is big, wide, and muddy. There's also litter in the river. Now, there's a lot less litter thanks to the work of Missouri River Relief. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, Trevor Harris talked with Melanie Cheney about why a cleaner Missouri River matters (Think drinking water.) Also, hear music from Violet Vonder Haar, who will be performing this Saturday's Boonville River Festival.


Trevor Harris / KBIA

Since 2000, Columbian Eduardo Crespi has run a community center called El Centro Latino. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with Crespi. KBIA's Trevor Harris also met some Columbia residents who were at the center on a recent Monday.


Trevor Harris/KBIA

Many people work behind the scenes to enliven Columbia's public access television channel, CAT-TV. This week KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with a handful of CAT founders, members and staff to find out how they use the medium of television to get their voices heard. Also on this week's program, Trevor talks with Peter Hatch, director of gardens and grounds at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home outside Charlottesville, Virginia. Hatch visited Columbia this week for a series of lectures celebration of the MU Botanic Garden's 15th anniversary.


Shane Epping/MU Disability Center

As thousands of students arrive in Columbia for the new school year, much work must happen behind the scenes to prepare. On this week's Thinking Out Loud host Darren Hellwege visits with a range of staff from University of Missouri departments whose work impacts and is impacted by the student experience at MU.


Matthew Washburn

When you were growing up did you play classical music? Did you have your own instrument? The classical classical duo Zofo - made up of Eva-Maria Zimmermann and Keisuke Nakagoshi - play one piano. At the same time. KBIA's Trevor Harris  recently talked with the duo by phone about the nature of playing one piano with four hands, the process of commissioning new music for their repertoire and their new CD Zoforbit.

Credit: JudithZaimont.com

A pair of members of the virtuoso ensemble the Cypress String Quartet recently talked with KBIA's Trevor Harris. That interview and a talk with contemporary American composer Judith Zaimont are the topics on this week's Thinking Out Loud on KBIA.

Trevor Harris/KBIA

From 1914 to 1954 if you were black in Kirksville you attended the segregated Lincoln School. In this episode of Thinking Out Loud hear voices of Lincoln School alumni Clyde Johnson and a handful of local residents who want to see the Lincoln School building preserved. Some local visionaries imagine the school as a 21st century educational center for all residents of Kirksville.

Brooke Hamilton/Grindstone Photography

Establishing a landscape rich in native plant species is a different process from putting in an annual planting of tomatoes and beans. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, Trevor Harris talked with Elizabeth Hamilton-Steele about the work that goes in to building a native landscape for yard or pasture.


Credit: IMDB

Each summer, Kirk Trevor and the Missouri Symphony Society take classical music to a range of venues around Columbia and Mid-Missouri. From Stephens Lake Park to Douglass Park to Shelter Gardens, classical music fans get to absorb symphonic and chamber works in a range of diverse settings. This Thursday, the Missouri Symphony Orchestra returns to the Missouri Theatre stage to play film music.

Credit: www.umigarrett.com

What were you doing when you were thirteen? Umi Garrett is thirteen and she's possibly accomplished more than you and I put together had by that age. And then some. Garrett's been playing professionally since age eight. You can hear her perform this Saturday night when she joins the Missouri Symphony Orchestra at the Missouri Theatre for a concert the Missouri Symphony Society bills as Umi Returns


University of Missouri Press

If you are a creative type, then you may have given some thought to the process behind creating. Whether you paint, write essays or solve engineering problems, Columbia author William Least Heat-Moon has written a book that illuminates the creative process. Least Heat-Moon discussed his new book Writing Blue Highways on KBIA's Thinking Out Loud. He also speaks this Thursday at 7:00 p.m at the Daniel Boone Regional Library in Columbia.

Latisha Koetting

Next Monday is Memorial Day, a date established by Congress in 1968 as America's national day to remember and honor those American men and women who died in combat. If you are a veteran or know one, you likely think about those who died in combat on days other than just the last Monday in May each year. This week on Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris talked to veterans and their supporters about what they think about each year on Memorial Day.


Credit: Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre

On this weeks' Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with Quin Gresham, the Producing Artistic Director for the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre about the upcoming season at the theatre.

Credit: Marty Paten

When you first came to Columbia how did you arrive? Was it by car or bus? For several generations university and college students coming to Columbia almost entirely came by rail. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with a rider on the historic Wabash railroad into Columbia and the man who literally who wrote the book on the Columbia Branch Railroad.

Jon Poses

Over thirty-five years ago, Jon Poses came to Columbia for a journalism degree. He's long since got that degree. Today, for consistent advocacy of live jazz in Columbia, Jon Poses was recently named a 2014 Jazz Journalists Association 'Jazz Hero.'

Credit: GMD Three, Tyler Boye, Laura Watilo Blake, Lilian Finckel, Ken Blaze

This week on KBIA we're featuring music from the new release by guitarist Jason Vieaux, Play. You can hear tracks from the Azica Recrods release Play this week on KBIA. On this his thirteenth recording, Vieaux offers up a set of seventeen shorter pieces from guitarist-composers including Antonio Lauro and Andres Segovia.


Credit: Gene Royer/MU School of Music

This summer as in the past several summers, a festival comes to Mid-Missouri that brings contemporary classical composers, performers and fans together from around the world.

Credit: The State Historical Society of Missouri

When you think about the Civil War in Missouri what comes to mind? If Stefan Freund has anything to do with it you'll soon be more familiar with the sounds and images that the 1861-65 conflict produced. KBIA's Trevor Harris recently interviewed Freund, an MU School of Music faculty member about his new Civil War Oratorio that will have its premiere April 24 in Columbia's Jesse Auditorium.

Credit: Missouri Department of Conservation

Native or new-comer? No matter how long you and your family have called the Great State of Missouri home you can't claim a longer continuous lineage here than the paddlefish. This week on Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris talks to anglers and conservationists about the fish that has called central Missouri's Osage River home for more than 300 million years.


State Historical Society of Missouri

Roxanne Foster preserved some of Columbia's historical memory last year. In pursuit of her Masters Degree in News Reporting and Writing from MU's School of Journalism, Foster interviewed and recorded the stories of ten black and white Columbians who lived here during the desegregation era. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris visited with Foster about her subjects, their common themes and more. The State Historical Society of Missouri's Oral Historian Jeff Corrigan was Foster's advisor. Together, they recorded, transcribed and archived stories unique to Columbia in the late 1950s through the mid-1960s.

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