Trevor Harris

Announcer

Trevor serves as KBIA’s weekday morning host for classical music. He has been involved with local radio since 1990, when he began volunteering as a music and news programmer at KOPN, Columbia's community radio station. Before joining KBIA, Trevor studied social work at Mizzou and earned a masters degree in geography at the University of Alabama. He has worked in community development and in urban and bicycle/pedestrian planning, and recently served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia with his wife, Lisa Groshong. An avid bicycle commuter and jazz fan, Trevor has cycled as far as Colorado and pawed through record bins in three continents.

Ways to Connect

James Reid Lambdin / The White House Historical Association

Political conventions in American have been around as long as there has been an America. Back in 1840, members of Missouri's Whig Party made their way by land and by water to Rocheport for their state convention. The Friends of Historic Rocheport's president Sherry Moreau was Trevor Harris' guest on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

Also on this program Chris Campbell from the Boone County Historical Society discussed Boone County Votes, a show opening next month at the society's Columbia museum.


Missouri Department of Conservation

If you’ve stepped out to enjoy the night air lately, you’ve likely noticed a loud newcomer to the chorus of night sounds.  This week on Discover Nature, we’ll shine some light on the Northern True Katydid.


Central Missouri Humane Society

A mass release of plastic ducks makes for a day at the races. On a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege previewed the upcoming COMO Duck Derby, a fundraiser for the Central Missouri Humane Society.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, take a trip to a stream or pond near you, and observe the colorful dance of mating dragonflies across the surface of the water. 


CountryMusicTattleTale.com

Richard King and Darren Hellwege looked ahead to the 2015 Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival.


Root N Blues N BBQ

Blues in the Schools is part of Columbia's annual Roots N Blues N BBQ music festival. On a recent episode of Thinking out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege visited with Richard King about the work King is doing to spread blues music to school area school children.


CMHSpets.org

Getting affordable pet care to underserved pet owners is part of the new Community Outreach Program of the Central Missouri Humane Society. Executive Director Michelle Casey visited with Darren Hellwege on a recent episode of KBIA's Thinking Out Loud.


Missouri Department of Conservation

As we head into the middle of summer, keep an eye out in the woods for ripening blackberries.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Spend much time near a Missouri waterbody in summer, and chances are you’ll spot see reptiles galore including water snakes basking on a sunny day.

TinyHouseExpedition.com

A new history of the Ozark's Baldknobbers is out. KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with the book's author and took a look at the tiny home movement on Thinking Out Loud.


Thinking Out Loud: Making Waves

Jun 14, 2016
Kelsey Kupferer / Making Waves

Radio can be a powerful medium for storytelling. Just ask a group of students at Columbia's Rock Bridge High School.


Missouri Department of Conservation

If you’ve spent any time out in nature in the last week you may have noticed a well-protected reddish fruit starting to ripen now. This week on Discover Nature, we search for wild raspberries.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Spring storms bring the threat of damaging wind, hail, flooding, and erosion, but they also restore life to the landscape providing nutrients to plants and soil, and drinking-water for wildlife. This week, on Discover Nature, we celebrate May as American Wetlands Month.

Jim Rathert / Missouri Department of Conservation

What do fawnfoot, monkey face and fat pocketbook all have in common? They are a few of the fun names of Missouri’s 69 freshwater mussel species.

Missouri Department of Conservation

So much in the natural world is ephemeral especially in the spring. This week on Discover Nature we look and listen for buzzing signs of the season.


Trevor Harris / KBIA

Twenty years ago, when Milton Rafferty republished Henry Rowe Schooclraft's 1820 Ozarks journal, Rafferty introduced the explorer Schooclraft to a new generation of scholars. Schoolcraft's journal is unique in that he describes flora and fauna in the pre-statehood Missouri Territory in a way that no one else had to date.


Missouri Department of Conservation

As you hit the road this spring, keep an eye out for Missouri residents at special risk this time of year:  this week on Discover Nature, we hit the brakes for turtles on the move.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Wildflowers and warm weather signify the arrival of spring in Missouri and one of the state’s largest, heaviest wild mammals enjoys the season as much as we do. This week on Discover Nature, we recognize National Bear Awareness Month.


The State Historical Society of Missouri

In 1818, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft walked across the Ozarks. His curiosity and search for lead deposits are what drove him and travel companion Levi Pettibone to cover almost 900 miles in 90 days. Schoolcraft's journal recounted intact landscapes largely unmolested by humans. A new KBIA series looks at Schoolcraft's changing landscapes.


Missouri Department of Conservation

There are almost 1,000 different kinds of bats. Bats eat mostly insects, but when insects are not available during winter, bats in Missouri survive our colder months by hibernating or migrating to warmer places. 

Alycia McGee / Cancer Research Center

On a recent Thinking out Loud, Darren Hellwege visited with Jack Bozarth and Alison Fea from Columbia's Cancer Research Center about the work that group is doing to better understand cancer.

  

This program originally aired April 5, 2016.

Listen for new episodes of Thinking Out Loud each Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. on KBIA.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Spring weather settling-in across Missouri triggers breeding activities for many frogs.  This week on Discover Nature, we’ll learn about the Boreal Chorus Frog. 

Listen in prairies, and along the grassy edges of marshes and farm ponds, for these small gray or tan frogs – three-quarters to one-and-a-half inches long – with three wide stripes down the back.  They begin breeding in late February, with their raspy, vibrating call peaking in mid-April – a sound similar to running a fingernail over the teeth of a pocket comb. 

Thomas Jefferson scholar Peter Onuf visited with KBIA's Darren Hellwege in advance of his visit to Columbia. Onuf is a regular contributor to BackStory as one of The History Guys.

Also on this week's program Darren talked with Columbian Nanette Ward about an April 22 event Freedom From Fashion that is a benefit for Ward's group, the Central Missouri Stop Human Trafficking Coalition.

This program was originally broadcast on March 29, 2016.

Listen for new episodes of Thinking Out Loud each Tuesday evening at 6:30 on KBIA 91.3FM.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

On this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege visited with City of Columbia Volunteer Coordinator Leigh Contwitz about the upcoming Clean-Up Columbia event and other volunteer opportunities. Trevor Harris also filed a story from the James Apartments about a local group working to salvage architectural elements from the 1903 structure before its planned demolition.

Boone County Historical Society

If you ever visited Columbia's former Boone Tavern restaurant, you may have seen the many photos that lined the walls of the former downtown eatery. These images of historic Columbia, represent the photo collection assembled over many years by former restaurant owner Dick Walls. When Bleu Restaurant took over the space three years ago, the pictures of parades on brick streets and MU student revelry didn't really fit the new restaurant's aesthetic.

CCUA / Facebook

This time of year is especially exciting to everyone - gardeners and non-gardeners alike. That’s because we’ve more or less been cooped up inside all winter, and are as ready as ever to bust out of the back door and do something, anything outside.

The State Historical Society of Missouri

Almost 200 years ago, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft and his travel companion Levi Pettibone set off on a walk. In the winter of 1818-1819, the two men walked and rode on horseback across 900 miles of hills and grasslands in what would soon become the state of Missouri. The landscapes they saw are - depending on who you talk with - either radically altered or barely changed.

Anna Soulstice / Facebook

On this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talks with a pair of Mid-Missouri musicians. We have in-studio performances from Boonville country singer Tanner Lee and Columbia singer-songwriter Anna Soulstice. Also on this week's program, we have a preview of this Sunday's Wild and Scenic Film Festival.


Missouri River Relief

Missouri River Relief is a Columbia-based non-profit that has made a name for itself using volunteers to clean up trash - lots of trash - along the Big Muddy. Late last year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded the group an Environmental Education Grant. River relief staff Kristen Schulte and Steve Schnarr discussed plans for the award on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

Increasingly, sound is providing scientists with clues about changes in habitat. On this episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talks with Christopher Bobryk, a Columbia-based soil scientist with the USDA who uses sound to measure habitat. He visited with Darren about the growing field of soundscape ecology.


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