Views preview: Gunmen target satirical paper

Jan 7, 2015

Scene of attack at Charlie Hebdo offices.
Credit Jacky Naegelen / Reuters

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Terrorists Kill 12 at Paris Paper

Three gunmen killed 12 people and injured several more at a weekly Paris newspaper that has satirized Islam and the prophet Mohammed.

Nicholas Vinocur and Antony Paone, Reuters, "At least 12 dead in Paris attack on satirical newspaper"

Maia de la Baume and Dan Bilefsky, International New York Times, "Gunmen in Paris Kill 12 at Offices of Satirical Newspaper Charlie Hebdo"

Times vs. Tribune

The Columbia Daily Tribune published a piece on events hosted by the Jefferson City-based Missouri Times as examples of lobbying that isn't always reported.  The story by political reporter Rudi Keller produced an inflammatory response from the Times’ editor.

Rudi Keller, Columbia Daily Tribune, "Publisher's parties highlight reporting issues in Missouri ethics laws"

Scott Faughn, Missouri Times, "We have officially arrived...and we owe it all to our readers"

State Government News Down the Memory Hole?

Critics say legislative term limits and declining interest by established media in covering state government have produced a loss of institutional memory that's crippling collaboration on important issues.  Bob Priddy, who won’t be covering the Missouri legislature for the first time in 40 years, also previews the session that begins at noon today.

On the Media, WNYC, "State House Beat"

Eli Yokley, PoliticMo blog, "Koster calls legisltative term limits a 'tragedy'"

Virginia Young, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, "Ferguson could set tone for Missouri legislative session"

LBJ, Selma and Historical Accuracy

Historians question whether the new movie about Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement treats former president Lyndon Johnson fairly.  As historians in their own right, Earnest Perry and Bob Priddy give their take.

Jennifer Schuessler, New York Times, "Depiction of Lyndon B. Johnson in 'Selma' Raises Hackles

Bob Schieffer, Face the Nation, CBS News, "Does the film 'Selma' portray LBJ unfairly?"

Clarence Page, Tribune Content Agency, "'Selma' is a film worth arguing about"

Stuart Scott’s Legacy

Long-time ESPN anchor, reporter and analyst Stuart Scott died from cancer this past Sunday.  Colleagues say he brought a “hip hop sensibility” to a network that was, at the time of Scott’s hiring, full of white, male talent who took themselves too seriously.

Richard Dietsch, Sports Illustrated, "Inside ESPN's tribute to late SportsCenter star Stuart Scott"

Dan Diamond, Forbes, "Stuart Scott Died Young But His Brave Legacy Should Live On"

Jay Talks, Slams Serial

The Serial podcast ended its first season in mid-December with millions of downloads, but unable to decide whether high school student Adnan Syed was guilty of murdering his ex-girlfriend 15 years ago.   The key witness in the case, Jay Wilds, wouldn’t give Serial reporter Sarah Koenig an on-tape interview.  But last week The Intercept got Jay to talk.  What he said about Koenig led opponents and defenders to debate her journalistic integrity.

Natasha Vargas-Cooper, The Intercept, "Jay Speaks Part 3: The Collateral Damage of an Extremely Popular Podcast About Murder"

Ken Kurson, New York Observer, "Here's How The Intercept Landed Serial's Star Witness for His First Interview"

Matt Wilstein, Mediaite, "Serial Producer Responds to Jay's Interview: 'Our Reporting Is Solid'"

Andrew Beaujon, Washingtonian, "How NPR Is Preparing for 'The Year of the Podcast'"

Two Epic First Amendment Fails

A city councilman says a reporter can't use his name without permission and a judge tells journalists what they can and can't report from open court proceedings.

Eugene Volokh, The Volokh Conspiracy blog, Washington Post, "This post shamelessly uses Frederick County (Md.) Council Member Kirby Delauter's name without authorization"

Scott Dolan, Portland Press Herald, "Well-known laywer from Standish convicted of assault and disorderly conduct"