All Things Considered

Weekdays 3:00pm-6:00pm, Weekend at 4pm
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. 

A one-hour edition of the program runs on Saturday and Sunday.

The posts below are some of the highlights from All Things ConsideredVisit the program page on NPR to see a full list of stories.

Local Host(s): 
Kyle Felling
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
51828857e1c8c2efcdc168f5|5182884be1c8c2efcdc168de

Pages

Economy
5:20 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Obama Blames Republicans For Debt Panel's Failure

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 8:27 pm

President Obama Monday put the blame for the supercommittee's failure squarely on congressional Republicans — and their unwillingness to consider higher taxes on the wealthy. Obama also threatened to veto any effort to escape from the automatic spending cuts agreed to in August without a balanced plan to reduce the deficit. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Scott Horsley for more.

Economy
5:17 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Supercommittee Fails To Reach Debt Deal

The bipartisan supercommittee says it failed to reach a deficit-reduction deal. NPR's Tamara Keith speaks to Robert Siegel with the latest from Capitol Hill.

Three Books...
3:08 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Presidents And Pilgrims: 3 Boundary Pushing Books

Donna Neary flickr.com

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 8:27 pm

With Thanksgiving hard upon us, now is a good time to think about our past. History writers can tell the best stories from centuries of human achievement and folly, yet too often they produce recitations of one damned thing after another. A few, though, combine a respect for accuracy with a deep understanding of the longings, fears and triumphs of the people of our past. Such books make magic.

Read more
Planet Money
3:00 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Buying A Savings Bond Is About To Get Harder

U.S. Treasury Department

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:15 am

Paper savings bonds used to be a wholesome part of American culture. You bought them when your kids were born, to save for college. You bought them to save for a home.

But starting next month, they'll be a lot harder to get. Banks will stop selling paper savings bonds on January 1, 2012.

Read more
Music Interviews
2:21 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Yo-Yo Ma's Bluegrass-Inspired 'Goat Rodeo'

Yo-Yo Ma's latest Americana exploration features his work with mandolinist Chris Thile, bassist Edgar Meyer and fiddler Stuart Duncan.
Jeremy Cowart

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 12:27 pm

A sense of humor comes through The Goat Rodeo Sessions, the latest Americana exploration for the world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma.

Read more
Television
4:48 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

How One Man Played 'Moneyball' With 'Jeopardy!'

Roger Craig poses with Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek after winning $250,000 in last week's Tournament of Champions.
Carol Kaelson Sony Pictures

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 5:32 pm

One night last September, Roger Craig, a computer scientist from Newark, Del., was about to make history.

In his second appearance on Jeopardy!, he'd given one of the most dominant performances ever seen on the show.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:15 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

Bill Maher Lays Down The (Mostly Silly) Law

Comedian Bill Maher is the host of the HBO political commentary show, Real Time With Bill Maher.
Janet Van Ham AP

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 5:32 pm

Comedian Bill Maher wraps up every installment of his TV show, Real Time, with a segment called "New Rules." That's where he takes potshots at whatever's bothering him — from wrappers on ice cream cones, to red light cameras, to more serious subjects like war and economic ruin.

His new book, The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass, sports a title we can't say on the radio and a mix of rules both lighthearted and serious, some of which never appeared on television.

Read more
Music Interviews
12:58 am
Sun November 20, 2011

The Man Behind The Music Of 'Entourage' Sets The Tone

Scott Vener is the music supervisor for How to Make It in America. The finale of the second season airs Sunday night on HBO.
Jeff Forney HBO

Scott Vener is the music supervisor for How to Make It in America, which air its season finale Sunday night on HBO.

"I would say primarily a lot of the music I'm finding is sort of like what is bubbling on the Internet," Vener says.

Read more
Analysis
2:00 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Week In News: Obama Wraps Up Asia Tour

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 5:37 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's Weekends on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

MAHMOUD SHAMMAM: What we can confirm now that Saif al-Gadhafi has been arrested and he should be tried in front of the Libyan court, by Libyan people and by Libyan justice.

SULLIVAN: That's Mahmoud Shammam, Libya's National Transitional Council's information minister, announcing that Moammar Gadhafi's son Saif al-Islam had been captured. The U.S. State Department hasn't confirmed it yet.

Read more
Science
12:57 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Perhaps Scientists Like Lab Mice TOO Much

The lab mouse is the most ubiquitous animal in biomedical research, but that doesn't mean it's always the best subject for researching disease.

In a series of articles for Slate magazine, Daniel Engber looked into why the mouse is such a mainstay of science — and whether that's a good thing.

Read more
Music Interviews
12:19 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

We Are Augustines: Old Wounds Inspire Recovery Songs

We Are Augustines' debut album is Rise Ye Sunken Ships. Left to right: Eric Sanderson, Rob Allen, Billy McCarthy.
Arwen Hunt Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 3:32 pm

Billy McCarthy lost his mother to suicide when he was a teenager. He cared for his schizophrenic brother as best he could after that, but his brother landed in solitary confinement in prison, where he eventually took his own life, too. Somehow, McCarthy found a way to rise above his anguish — as a songwriter. He began playing music while living in foster care in California.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:01 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Kurt Vonnegut Was Not A Happy Man. 'So It Goes.'

Author Kurt Vonnegut, shown in 1979 in New York City, died in 2007 at age 84.
Marty Reichenthal AP

Kurt Vonnegut was a counterculture hero, an American Mark Twain, an avuncular, jocular friend to the youth — until you got to know him.

"Kurt was actually rather flinty, rather irascible. He had something of a temper," author Charles Shields tells weekends on All Things Considered host Laura Sullivan. Shields is the author of a new biography of Vonnegut, called And So It Goes: Kurt Vonnegut: A Life.

"But as I also point out in the book," Shields adds, "he was a damaged person."

Read more
Music Interviews
4:41 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

A.A. Bondy: Making His Own World

A.A. Bondy performs at The Waiting Room in Omaha, Neb. He says it took him eight days to write his new album, Believers.
Hilary Stohs-Krause

One Friday night at The Waiting Room in Omaha, Neb., more than 150 people are milling around waiting for A.A. Bondy to take the stage. His new album, Believers, came out two months ago and caught fans like Andre Steinbergs by surprise.

Read more
Asia
2:46 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Myanmar's Ghost Capital Rises From The Jungle

People offer prayers at the newly completed Uppatasaniti Pagoda in Naypiydaw earlier this year. It's unclear when construction on the new capital began or how much it has cost this impoverished nation where round-the-clock power is a rarity.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 11:31 am

The government of Myanmar bars or severely restricts reporting by foreign correspondents. NPR is withholding the name of the veteran journalist who recently entered the country and filed this story, in order to protect his identity and his ability to return in the future.

The newest — and nicest — road in Myanmar is, paradoxically, one of the emptiest as well: Only a handful of cars travel along the desolate four-lane highway to nowhere, or so it seems.

Read more
NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Army Successfully Tests Hypersonic Missile

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:02 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Imagine flying from L.A. to New York in about 30 minutes. That's roughly eight times the speed of sound. And yesterday, the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command managed to launch a missile that flew at that speed. The test missile was sent from Hawaii to hit a site on the Kwajalein Atoll in the South Pacific about 2,400 miles away, and within a half hour, the missile struck its target. And the military is hoping to speed it up even more.

Read more
NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Week In Politics: Gingrich, Debt Panel

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Analysts: Fate Of Egyptian Revolution At Stake

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:02 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

In Egypt today, a rare move. Islamists and secular activists joined forces in several cities for a protest. They want to pressure their military rulers to cede control to an elected civilian government. The protest was sparked by a document floated by the interim government. It would give the Egyptian armed forces unchecked power.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson went back to Cairo's now famous Tahrir Square and found tens of thousands of demonstrators.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING CROWD)

Read more
NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Future Of Ministry Uncertain After Cathedral's Sale

The Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Calif., known for its Hour of Power broadcasts, is being sold to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:02 pm

The Roman Catholic Church is about to buy a beacon of Protestant televangelism.

The Crystal Cathedral, a temple of glass in Garden Grove, Calif., will be sold to the Catholic Church for $57 million — a decision that left some congregants furious and their future up in the air.

When the Crystal Cathedral declared bankruptcy last year, it soon became clear that the legendary building would have to be sold. There were several offers, but in the end, the church's board favored the Catholic diocese in Orange County.

Read more
Food
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

'Managed' Apple Creates A Buzz

Melissa Block talks with John Seabrook, staff writer at The New Yorker. His latest article, "Crunch," delves into the world of the SweeTango — a new hybrid apple that is part Honeycrisp, part Zestar. It's sweet and tangy. There's a hint of cinnamon, a hint of pineapple and a whole lot of crunch.

Science
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Scientists Claim Neutrinos Are Faster Than Light

Scientists at the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics are now touting a successful second experiment that may challenge Albert Einstein's long-held theory of relativity. The results show that neutrinos could travel faster than the speed of light. Guy Raz talks to Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University, about the findings.

NPR Story
4:49 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Obama Turns Focus On Pacific Allies

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 4:59 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. President Obama arrived in Indonesia today, the latest stop in a 10 day trip across the Pacific. He's used the trip to send a message that the U.S. is shifting its attention to the Asia Pacific region, both for economic and security reasons. That includes the announcement yesterday that the U.S. will deploy 2,500 Marines to Australia.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:49 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

U.S. Behind The Curve In Drunk Driving, Author Finds

A new book called One for the Road explores the history of drunk driving and attitudes around it.
iStockphoto.com

When Barron Lerner was writing his book on the history of drunk driving in America — and efforts to control it — he carried out an experiment at home that involved a bottle of vodka, a shot glass and a Breathalyzer. He was the guinea pig.

"I was trying to figure out just how drunk you had to be in order to not drive safely," says Lerner, a professor of medicine and public health at Columbia University, who wrote One for the Road. He decided to drink and test his levels — but he didn't actually get into a car.

Read more
The Record
3:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

A Televised Singing Competition With A Mission

Pia Maria Holmgren (Sámi in Sweden) performs at last year's Liet International minority song contest.
Sandro Weltin/Council of Europe

Auditions are now underway for next May's Eurovision Song Contest — that often-ridiculed television spectacle that has drawn millions of viewers around the world every year since 1956. In 2012 the host country will be Azerbaijan, since that country fielded last year's winner.

Read more
History
2:06 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Dead Sea Scrolls On Display In Times Square

The ancient texts can be seen up close — right in the middle of New York City. There are some theatrics, but NPR's Margot Adler reports that the exhibit is happily understated.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Rep. Bachus Defends Trades

House Financial Services Committee Chairman Spencer Bachus faces questions about his stock purchases.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 6:52 pm

The STOCK Act, a bill that would ban members of Congress from trading stock based on nonpublic information they get because they're lawmakers, has 61 co-sponsors and counting. And after years of languishing with only one hearing, the measure is getting one in the House Financial Services Committee.

What's remarkable about this is that the STOCK Act had just nine co-sponsors last week. What changed? The CBS news magazine 60 Minutes did a story about congressional insider trading.

Read more
NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Chicagoans Join Occupy 'Day Of Disruption'

Occupy Wall Street protesters in Chicago mark the movement's second month. Cheryl Corley

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Obama Learns 'Lazy' Is A Four-Letter Word

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 4:49 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

President Obama has spoken for hours during his specific tour this week to CEOs, world leaders and military troops. As NPR's Ari Shapiro reports, one brief remark caught the ear of Republicans and you're likely to hear a lot of it in the months ahead.

Read more
NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

An Ancient Mariner's Tales Of Adventure

A new work of fiction is populated by historical characters. Tales of the New World by Sabina Murray takes as its template the adventures of some of the greatest world explorers and uses their stories to investigate the known and unknown. Alan Cheuse, who teaches writing at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., has a review.

Opinion
11:15 am
Thu November 17, 2011

National Book Award Winner Tells Tale Of Katrina

istockphoto.com

Jesmyn Ward's novel, Salvage the Bones, won this year's National Book Award in fiction.

When you live on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, stories of hurricanes are passed down through generations. For my parents the storm was called Camille, and on Aug. 17, 1969, it made landfall.

Read more
Music Interviews
3:39 pm
Wed November 16, 2011

R.E.M., R.I.P.

R.E.M. in the early days. Left to right: Michael Stipe, Mike Mills, Bill Berry, Peter Buck.
Laura Levine

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 5:02 pm

They were four guys out of Athens, Ga., with a three-letter name — and one hell of an impact on rock. R.E.M. was Michael Stipe singing lead, Mike Mills on bass and harmonies, Peter Buck on guitar and Bill Berry on drums, until Berry left the band in 1997.

"We never expected the thing to last any longer than a couple of years to begin with," Stipe says. "And then when it did, and we were making records and people were interested in it, the band started getting bigger and bigger and bigger."

Read more

Pages