All Things Considered

Weekdays 3:00pm-6:00pm, Weekend at 4pm
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. 

A one-hour edition of the program runs on Saturday and Sunday.

The posts below are some of the highlights from All Things ConsideredVisit the program page on NPR to see a full list of stories.

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Sports
4:14 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

In One-Sided Semifinal, Germany Hands Brazil A Devastating Loss

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:46 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The images out of Brazil right now are of fans in tears, faces with looks of disbelief, hands covering mouths in shock. In the first of two semifinal World Cup matches, the home team is losing and it's losing big. Germany is leading 5-0. Let's go to NPR's Tom Goldman in Rio de Janeiro. Tom, what's the scene where you are in Rio?

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Shots - Health News
3:57 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

What Looks Like Overcharging By Your Hospital Might Not Be

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 11:10 am

Despite concerns first raised a few years ago, hospitals do not seem to be abusing their electronic data systems to generate bigger bills and boost their income — at least according to authors of a large study released Tuesday. Other leaders in the field say the jury's still out.

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Book Your Trip
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

In 'Little Engine That Could,' Some See An Early Feminist Hero

Was "I think I can" the great-grandmother of "lean in?" Some readers see the plucky locomotive as a parable about working women, but some versions of the story feature a male protagonist instead.
Platt & Munk, Penguin Young Readers Group

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 7:23 pm

"Chug, chug, chug. Puff, puff, puff. Ding-dong, ding-dong."

The beloved tale of the little blue engine — who helps bring a broken-down train of toys to the good little boys and girls on the other side of the mountain — has been chugging along for a very long time. But despite the locomotive's optimistic refrain — I think I can, I think I can, I think I can — the story has a somewhat checkered past: In its tracks, The Little Engine has left both a legal battle and a debate over whether the little blue engine is male or female.

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Afghanistan
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Early Vote Tallies Speed The Sparring Between Afghan Candidates

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 5:13 pm

Preliminary voting tallies in the Afghan presidential election, released Monday, did little to ease a brewing political crisis. The losing candidate continued to claim fraud, declaring himself the winner instead. Meanwhile, the U.S. is warning of a power grab.

Law
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

For Prison Reform Critics, Jail Cells Spell Hope To Kick Addiction

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:54 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Afghanistan
4:27 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Afghan Election Numbers Come With A Warning: Results Not Final

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. Today, Afghans are one step closer to knowing who their next president will be. More than three weeks after voters went to the polls, election officials announced that candidate Ashraf Ghani has a wide lead. But Ghani is not out of the woods yet. The election process now enters an appeals phase that is sure to be contentious before the final results are announced on July 24. NPR's Sean Carberry sent this story from Kabul.

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Book Reviews
4:27 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Post-Apocalyptic World Falls Flat In 'California'

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 10:49 am

Edan Lepucki's debut, California, sold thousands of copies even before the official publication date when talk-show host Stephen Colbert urged readers to pre-order it from a national independent chain as a protest against the "books-and-everything else" giant, Amazon.

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Men In America
4:27 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Teen Tries To Be The Parent His Own Dad Never Was

Marvin Ramos, now 18, was overwhelmed when his daughter, Hailey, was born. But now he says he's determined to be the best father he can be. "I haven't run away," he says, "and I never want to."
Marvin Ramos Courtesy of WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:40 pm

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

Marvin Ramos found out he was going to be a father when his girlfriend, Stephanie, called him during a basketball game. He says he sat down on a bench and looked up at the sky. He was 16. Stephanie was 19.

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The Salt
3:39 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Couple Revives Lost Moroccan Fig Liquor, One Bottle At A Time

Bottles of mahia in the Nahmias et Fils distillery.
Alex Schmidt for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:56 pm

Before the crowds descend on the Whisky Jewbilee, a kosher alcohol tasting event in Manhattan, David and Dorit Nahmias stand behind their vendor table, getting psyched up.

"This is like the big game," Dorit Nahmias says.

Events like these are a key tool for getting the word out about their tiny distillery, and the Nahmiases attend half a dozen of them per year. The product they're trying to sell is one few people have heard of: mahia. Dorit rehearses her pitch:

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Politics
3:38 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

In Maine, A Gay Candidate With An Uneven Record On LGBT Rights

Democratic Rep. Mike Michaud speaks at the Pride Parade and Festival in Portland, Maine, on June 21. Michaud, who is openly gay, is running for governor with the backing of national LGBT groups.
Susan Sharon NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:56 pm

Maine was among the first states to legalize same-sex marriage at the ballot box — and now, LGBT groups are hoping voters there will break new ground by electing the nation's first openly gay governor in November.

But Democratic candidate Mike Michaud only recently came out, and he hasn't always been a gay-rights supporter.

Responding to what he called a "whisper campaign" about his sexual orientation, the six-term congressman did something dramatic last November: He outed himself in a series of newspaper op-eds.

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All Tech Considered
3:29 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

We Asked, You Answered: Going To Extremes To Disconnect On Vacation

Our readers wrote in on how they tried to take a vacation from their smartphones.
Christian Wheatley iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 9:08 am

Summer is a great time to take a break from some of the stressors in our lives. For many of us, that stress is brought on by too much screen time and the pressure to stay connected.

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Around the Nation
5:56 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Programs Target Poverty In Obama's 5 'Promise Zones'

People line up at the FamilySource Center in Los Angeles, an organization in one of President Obama's five designated "Promise Zones" that aims to help fight poverty in the area.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 10:02 am

Five areas across the country have been designated as "Promise Zones" by the federal government. These zones, announced by President Obama in January, are intended to tackle poverty by focusing on individual urban neighborhoods and rural areas.

In the five Promise Zones — located in Philadelphia, San Antonio, southeastern Kentucky, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and Los Angeles — the idea is to basically carpet-bomb the neighborhoods with programs like after-school classes, GED courses and job training to turn those areas around.

What Happens In The Zone?

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Movie Interviews
4:33 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

The Life And Death Of 'The Internet's Own Boy'

Aaron Swartz was heavily involved in the popular 2012 campaign to prevent the passage of the federal Stop Online Piracy Act, or SOPA.
Quinn Norton Falco Ink Publicity

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:48 am

Aaron Swartz was a programmer, a hacker, a freedom of information activist — and a casualty of suicide.

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Music Interviews
4:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Years After 'The Killing Moon,' Echo & The Bunnymen Still At It

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:55 pm

The band Echo & The Bunnymen has released its first new album in five years, called Meteorites. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with frontman Ian McCulloch about the release.

U.S.
4:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Increasing Use Of Oil Trains Inspires Backlash From States

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:18 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Middle East
4:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Six Israeli Youths Arrested In Death Of Palestinian Teen

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:51 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Israel arrested six Israeli Jewish suspects today in connection with the kidnapping and murder of a 16-year-old Palestinian teenager. It's the first major development in a case that's sparked riots in Jerusalem and Arab towns in Israel. The teenager was seized from his home in East Jerusalem last week, and his charred body was found in a nearby forest. Officials say the autopsy shows he was burned to death.

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Law
4:26 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

More Municipalities Deny Federal Requests, Won't Detain Immigrants

Philadelphia City Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez pushed for the city to change its practice of detaining immigrants on behalf of federal officials.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 9:42 am

Before immigrants get deported, they are sometimes held temporarily by local law enforcement at the request of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. But cities across the country, including Philadelphia, are saying they will no longer fully cooperate with that plan.

Offenses including traffic stops and felonies can lead to deportation for immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally — or even those who are legal permanent residents. ICE requests that municipalities hold suspects until they can be transferred into federal custody.

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Author Interviews
4:14 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Release Of 'Echo's Bones' Resurrects Beckett's Rejected Work

Playwright and writer Samuel Beckett, shown here around 1970, wrote Echo's Bones at his editor's request — only to have it cut from his first collection.
Reg Lancaster Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 6:14 pm

Playwright and author Samuel Beckett, who died 25 years ago, wrote lasting works of literature like Waiting for Godot and Endgame. But a previously unpublished short story of his — now being released for the first time — was not so appreciated.

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Music Interviews
4:14 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Longtime Rockers NRBQ Get Down To 'Brass Tacks' In New Album

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 6:14 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEW RHYTHM AND BLUES QUARTET SONG)

NRBQ: (Singing) Why don't you sit in my lap, kiss me and give me a hug. You know that I'm thinking of...

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Music Reviews
5:54 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

Album Review: 'We Are All Young Together'

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:39 pm

Keyboard player Walter Martin is best known for his part in the indie band The Walkmen. After the group took a break last year, though, Martin ventured into kids music. Reviewer Stefan Shepherd says Martin's solo debut, We Are All Young Together, is surprising, sweet and playful.

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Energy
5:54 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

'Hell Must Look Like This': A Grueling Year For Train-Struck Town

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This weekend marks one year since a deadly train derailment in eastern Canada that killed 47 people. A U.S.-owned tanker train filled with oil from North Dakota derailed, sending plumes of fire through a small Quebec town. The explosion destroyed or contaminated much of the business district. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports that residents are still sorting out what parts of their lives and their community can be rebuilt.

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Shots - Health News
4:33 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

As A Husband Becomes Caregiver To His Wife, A Marriage Evolves

Rick and Marianne wash dishes together. She no longer remembers that he is her husband.
Andrew Nixon Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:56 am

When Rick Rayburn retired from the California State Parks system, he had his heart set on balmy days of gardening, playing tennis and traveling to France with his wife, Marianne.

But then, about three years ago, she was diagnosed with dementia. It disrupted the couple's lives from top to bottom, right on the cusp of retirement. At 67, Rick has taken on a big new role.

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Sports
3:00 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

Continental Rivals Take Spotlight In World Cup Quarters

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Brazil, tears of joy and relief as the World Cup home team won its quarterfinal against Colombia.

(CHEERING)

SIEGEL: Brazil beat Colombia 2-1 in a hard-fought game between the two South American neighbors, but as we'll hear, it was a costly victory. An earlier game today - Germany defeated France 1-nothing to move on to the World Cup final four. NPR's Tom Goldman is in Rio de Janeiro, and he joins us now. And, Tom, first of all, Brazil won. But in a way, it also lost. Tell us about that.

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Middle East
3:00 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

Jerusalem Is Roiled By Violence In A Third Day Of Clashes

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

There was a third straight day of clashes between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem today. The violence comes as Palestinians buried a teenage boy who had been kidnapped and found dead in a forest. Police are still investigating but Palestinians believe that the boy's killing was a revenge attack after three Israeli teens were abducted and killed. A crime Israel blames on Hamas. Daniel Estrin reports from Jerusalem.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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Latin America
3:00 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

Graffiti Artist Sprays Brazil's Turmoil Across Its City Walls

Paulo Ito's picture of a starving child left to dine on a soccer ball has been shared more than 50,000 times on Facebook.
Andre Penner AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:27 pm

Brazilian street artist Paulo Ito has captured the spirit of the World Cup with two controversial images: One depicts a starving Brazilian boy with nothing but a soccer ball to eat; the other depicts even protesters watching the games on television. They both speak to viewers worldwide about the costs of staging the mega event. Ito explains what inspired his work and what's happening in Brazil.

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Law
4:56 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Top NYPD Cop: Stop-And-Frisk Is Not 'The Problem Or The Solution'

The NYPD recently launched a study into what's causing a rise in shootings in the city. Commissioner William Bratton says it will examine a lot of factors, not just stop-and-frisk.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 5:41 pm

It's been nearly a year since a court ruling curtailed the New York Police Department's controversial practice known as stop-and-frisk, but NYPD Commissioner William Bratton says the city can be just as safe without it.

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All Tech Considered
4:17 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

In A Battle For Web Traffic, Bad Bots Are Going After Grandma

By hijacking a user's computer, "bad" bots make it look as if she visits a website often, thus making the site more valuable to advertisers.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 10:05 am

As the Web turns 25, it's becoming a terrific place if you're a bot.

It began as a tool for human communication, but now, over 60 percent of the traffic on the Web is automated applications called bots talking to other bots, according to one study. And experts say about half of those bots are bad.

But first let's talk about the good bots.

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NPR Ed
4:17 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Coaching First-Generation Students Through College

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 5:08 am

One-third of college students are the first in their families to enroll in college. But few of them graduate within six years, according to the Department of Education.

One program is working to change that, one student at a time. Juma Ventures isn't just trying to get kids into college ... it's trying to get them through it.

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Parallels
4:13 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Deportation Threat Doesn't Diminish Young Migrants' U.S. Hopes

Ezequiel Vazquez and his 15-year-old son, Ilbaro, leave a government-run shelter in Guatemala City. Ilbaro was deported from the U.S. after spending six months in a Texas detention facility. He returned with a U.S.- issued duffel bag full of clothes, shoes, books and toys.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 10:23 pm

The Obama administration says it will try to speed up deportations of tens of thousands of children who have illegally entered the U.S. from Central America in recent months. It's part of a stronger message the administration is hoping gets back to would-be migrants contemplating coming to the U.S.

But the message isn't getting through, and even those who have recently been deported say they will try again.

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Iraq
3:25 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

If Map Of Middle East Is Being Redrawn, What Lies Ahead For Kurds?

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 5:26 pm

Violence in Iraq has many wondering if the map of the Middle East is being redrawn before the world's eyes. If so, Iraqi Kurds might stand to gain, with an independent Kurdistan finally within reach. Fuad Hussein, a strategist for the Kurdistan Regional Government, joins Robert Siegel to speak about Kurds' hopes and fears.

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