All Things Considered

Weekdays 3:00pm-6:00pm, Weekend at 4pm
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. 

A one-hour edition of the program runs on Saturday and Sunday.

The posts below are some of the highlights from All Things ConsideredVisit the program page on NPR to see a full list of stories.

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Economy
3:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Dollar-Euro Exchange Rate Can Reveal Pulse Of Global Economy

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And now for our regular primer on global economics, no student loan required. Remember the European economic crisis? Just months ago, there was near panic that the euro zone would collapse, bringing down with it the entire international economy, again. So, how is Europe doing now and what is the overall state of the global economy? Well, one place economists look for answers to those questions is in the exchange rate between dollars and euros.

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Shots - Health News
2:44 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

'Sputnik' Orbits A Russian City, Finding And Healing Tuberculosis

Nurse Marina Bogdanova, with Sputnik, gives medications to Sergei Gaptenko, who is close to finishing treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis.
Konstantin Salomatin for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 7:33 am

Russia is confronting one of its most serious public health threats since the collapse of the Soviet Union. The threat is tuberculosis, but with a dangerous twist: Strains of the bacteria are widely circulating that are resistant to ordinary anti-TB drugs, and far harder to cure.

In parts of Siberia, nearly 30 percent of all tuberculosis cases aren't treatable by two of the most potent medications, the World Health Organization reported last year.

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
6:03 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Best Of The Summer: 6 Books The Critics Adore

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:30 pm

There is no one definition of a summer book. It can be a 1,000-page biography, a critically acclaimed literary novel, a memoir everyone is talking about — or it might be your favorite guilty pleasure: romance, crime, science fiction. Whatever you choose, it should be able to sweep you away to another world, because there is nothing like getting totally lost in a book on summer day. Here are a few books that swept away some of our favorite critics.

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Around the Nation
4:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

How Many Gay Couples Have Tied The Knot? Nobody Knows

Couples kiss at the Old Orange County Courthouse in Santa Ana, Calif., earlier this month.
Amy Taxin AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

Since the Supreme Court struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act in June, many questions have emerged about what the ruling may mean for same-sex couples.

There's one question, though, that would seem easy to answer: How many legal same-sex marriages are there in the U.S.?

The Limitations Of Self-Reporting

It turns out the answer is actually very complicated — so complicated that even experts such as Bob Witeck, president and founder of Witeck Communications, a marketing firm specializing in gay and lesbian consumers, are stumped.

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Shots - Health News
4:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Insurance Pitch To Young Adults Started In Fenway Park

Fans take in the view of the outfield at Denver's Coors Field as the San Diego Padres face the Colorado Rockies in June.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:45 am

The Major League Baseball season is now half over, and some fans are already starting to think about the World Series in October.

October is also a big month for the Obama administration.

That's when millions of Americans can start signing up for new health insurance policies through health exchanges established in each state under the Affordable Care Act.

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Music Reviews
4:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

On Two New Albums, A Modern-Minded Brass Band Cuts Loose

Virginia's No BS! Brass Band adopts and ultimately expands the brass-band tradition.
PJ Sykes Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

Brass bands often bring New Orleans to mind. But some 1,000 miles away from southeast Louisiana, there's a different kind of brass band at work: the No BS! Brass Band of Richmond, Va.

Since the late 1970s, the brass-band repertoire has morphed into a new sound with the addition of funk, hip-hop and post-bop jazz. With as many as 13 members, No BS! Brass Band picks up on — and expands — that new tradition.

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U.S.
3:43 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

In The World Of Air Travel, Not All Passengers Created Equal

Only a few of these passengers will be able to get flights out of San Francisco, depending on how many miles they fly and their "value" to the airline.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

When Asiana Flight 214 from South Korea crashed onto the runway at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, hundreds of flights into that airport were canceled, stranding thousands of travelers at airports across the country.

The Asiana crash came right in the middle of a holiday weekend, disrupting airline networks. And it occurred during a weekend when many flights were intentionally overbooked.

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NPR Story
3:15 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Abundance Of Elephants Strains South African Game Reserves

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In many parts of Africa, elephants are threatened by poaching. But in South Africa, they're doing so well that some game reserves say they're overpopulated. Now, many of those reserves are trying to limit elephant reproduction even while some ecologists believe it's the wrong approach. Willow Belden reports.

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NPR Story
3:15 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Book Review: 'Skinner'

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Charlie Huston is a Los Angeles-based writer known for his superhero comic books and crime novels. Alan Cheuse couldn't wait to get his hands on Huston's latest thriller called "Skinner." Here's his review.

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NPR Story
3:15 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

NSA Leaks Focus New Attention On Government Contractors

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top-secret NSA documents, predicted a month ago that the U.S. government would accuse him of committing grave crimes. That comment came in a video released today by The Guardian newspaper. At the time he disclosed the secret information, Snowden was an employee of a private firm Booz Allen Hamilton.

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Music News
2:28 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Modern Hymn Writers Aim To Take Back Sunday

Modern hymn writers Kristyn and Keith Getty run through their song "In Christ Alone" at their home near Nashville's Music Row.
Courtesy of Stephen Jerkins

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 10:35 am

There was a time when hymns were used primarily to drive home the message that came from the pulpit. But then came the praise songs.

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All Tech Considered
1:45 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Arrest Caught On Google Glass Reignites Privacy Debate

Filmmaker Chris Barrett wearing his Google Glass. He is among the first 1,000 nondeveloper testers of the product.
Jennifer Rubinovitz Courtesy of Chris Barrett

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

The Fourth of July holiday brought about another first for Google Glass, the computing device that you can wear on your face.

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Parallels
12:59 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Reversing Direction, Some Syrian Refugees Now Head Home

Refugees at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan try to squeeze on one of the buses heading back to Syria. Syrian refugees have been coming to Jordan for two years, but some are now starting to head home.
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

In the Jordanian desert, the chaos begins at sundown, when the wind whips up the desert sand and the buses arrive. For the past two years, Syrian refugees have been streaming into Jordan, and they now number an estimated half million.

But for the past month, more refugees have returned to Syria than entered Jordan, and hundreds are leaving daily from Zaatari, the U.N.'s largest refugee camp in Jordan.

"Four buses are going every day," says Kilian Kleinschmidt, who runs Zaatari. "Depending on how many people manage to storm the buses, it's probably 300 to 400 people."

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Author Interviews
5:31 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

How 'Dancing In The Street' Became A Protest Anthem

In November 1964, Betty Kelly, Martha Reeves and Rosalind Ashford (aka Martha Reeves and the Vandellas) were at the top of the charts with their hit "Dancing in the Street."
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

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The Two-Way
4:36 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

For Pilots, Most Landings Are 'Routine' Procedure

This aerial photo shows the wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport on Saturday.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

Two Chinese teenagers were killed and dozens of other passengers were injured when an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777's tail snapped off and the plane struck the ground just short of the runway on Saturday. Dramatic landings like this are ones commercial pilots hope to never encounter as they guide the hundreds of planes safely to the ground each day.

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Around the Nation
3:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

New Handicapped Sign Rolls Into New York City

In the beginning of their project, Sara Hendren and Brian Glenney stuck their new design over existing handicapped signs around Boston.
Darcy Hildreth

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

The handicapped sign is getting a new look — at least in New York City.

The initial design, created in 1968, depicted a person with no head in a wheelchair. The sign has changed since then — the figure eventually got a head — and now it's trying something new.

Sara Hendren, a Harvard graduate design student, is co-creator of a guerrilla street art project that replaces the old sign with something more active.

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Theater
3:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Broadway's 'First Date': A Greek Chorus Of Emotional Baggage

Krysta Rodriguez played Ana Vargas in the recently canceled backstage-on-Broadway TV series Smash, and Zachary Levi earned a fervent following in the title role of NBC's Chuck. Both performers have backgrounds in the theater, and they'll be together on Broadway this summer in the premiere of the musical comedy First Date.
Matthew Murphy

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

Many fans of the TV show Chuck fell in love with the nerd-turned-unwitting spy at the heart of the show, but most probably didn't know that he could sing.

Zachary Levi is now rehearsing for his first role on Broadway — a new musical comedy called First Date — which also features Krysta Rodriguez, the star of another NBC program, Smash.

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U.S.
7:40 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Officials Confirm Fatalities In San Francisco Plane Accident

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

It's Weekends on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rebecca Sheir. We go to the latest now out of San Francisco. An Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea crashed there earlier today. Two people are confirmed dead, several are injured. NPR's Richard Gonzales joins us now from San Francisco with the latest. Now, Richard, let's start with casualties. What do we know at this point?

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U.S.
6:35 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

San Francisco General Takes In Patients From Plane Crash

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News, I'm Rebecca Sheir. More now on the breaking news out of San Francisco. That's where an Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea, crashed earlier today.

Reporter Molly Samuel is with our member station KQED, and she joins us from the San Francisco General Hospital. And I understand there was just a press conference there. So, Molly, what do we know now?

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U.S.
5:42 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Investigation Into San Francisco Plane Crash Begins

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

It's Weekends on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rebecca Sheir. More now on the breaking news out of San Francisco, that's where an Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea crashed earlier today. A team from the National Transportation Safety Board is on its way to investigate the crash at San Francisco International Airport. Details are still sketchy surrounding the crash, which occurred at 11:36 a.m. Pacific Time. NPR's Brian Naylor joins us now. Brian, what do we know about injuries?

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Music Interviews
4:29 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Yiddish Preservationists Take Their Subject To The Stage

Michael Alpert and Ethel Raim perform as part of the An-sky Yiddish Heritage Ensemble.
Janina Wurbs Courtesy of The Center for Traditional Music and Dance

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

The name of the An-sky Yiddish Heritage Ensemble doubles as its mission statement: The quartet of performers and researchers has built a repetoire of old Yiddish folk songs dating back 100 years to the shtetls of Ukraine, in hopes of keeping that music from disappearing. Michael Alpert, who sings in the group, says it's part of a revival of Eastern Eurpoean Jewish culture that's be going on for nearly 40 years.

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Author Interviews
4:29 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Finding Meaning In The Mosh Pit Among Often-Reviled Groupies

Shaggy 2 Dope, left, and Violent J make of the rap duo Insane Clown Posse, seen here in their stage makeup in 1999.
Joseph Cultice AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

The bands Phish and Insane Clown Posse have spawned some of the most rabid fans in music history. Their world of obsession is not an easy one to break into, but on a warm December night in Miami back in 2009, pop culture writer Nathan Rabin went to see a concert that would inspire him to enter the orbit of these infamous groupies.

He wrote a book about them, You Don't Know Me But You Don't Like Me, and tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rebecca Sheir about his first-hand look at the two often-reviled sub-cultures.

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U.S.
4:29 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Following Up On Reports From The SFO Plane Crash

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rebecca Sheir.

More now on the breaking news out of San Francisco. That's where an Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea, crashed earlier today. A team from the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating. Details are still sketchy surrounding the crash at San Francisco International Airport, which occurred at 11:36 a.m. Pacific Time.

NPR's Brian Naylor joins us now with more details. Brian, what do we know about injuries?

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Movie Interviews
4:14 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

The Man Who Helps Johnny Depp Put His Face On

With a long history of Johnny Depp collaborations — from Edward Scissorhands through the Pirates of the Caribbean films to this summer's The Lone Ranger — Joel Harlow knows that sometimes you've just gotta ignore the dead crow and get on with the job.
Peter Mountain Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

When Joel Harlow started his career, he was perfectly happy sleeping on the floor — as long as he was making monsters. He was doing what he always wanted: working as a makeup artist.

Years later, Harlow is no longer using peanut butter for monster touch-ups (yes, that happened). He's worked with actor Johnny Depp on about a dozen films with some rather makeup-heavy characters.

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Politics
3:26 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Big Personalities Are Front And Center In NYC Mayoral Race

Mayoral candidate Christine Quinn marches in the New York Gay Pride Parade on June 30.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

Everything about the New York City mayor's race is supersized.

No less than a dozen candidates are vying to succeed Michael Bloomberg as leader of the nation's biggest city — five Republicans and seven Democrats. The candidates have appeared at more than 100 forums and debates, and the primary is still two months away.

Observers say that the crowded field could favor big personalities.

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Agriculture
4:53 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

What Is Farm Runoff Doing To The Water? Scientists Wade In

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey sample water in Goodwater Creek, Mo., for pesticides and other chemicals that may have run off from the surrounding land.
Abbie Fentress Swanson Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

America's hugely productive food system is one of its success stories. The nation will export a projected $139.5 billion in agricultural products this fiscal year alone. It's an industry that supports "more than 1 million jobs," according to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

But all that productivity has taken a toll on the environment, especially rivers and lakes: Agriculture is the nation's leading cause of impaired water quality, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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Parallels
4:48 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Gatsby-Like Extravagance And Wealth ... In Communist China

A waiter delivers glasses of wine to guests at a luxury hotel bar near the Bund in Shanghai, on Sept. 8, 2012.
Aly Song Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

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Around the Nation
4:48 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Vacation Horror Stories: Battling Snow And Broken Transmissions

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The search for true relaxation can be a taxing one. You take some time off to get away thinking of paradise and then harsh reality sets in. That's the sort of experience we're chronicling this summer in a series we call...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Vacation...

(SOUNDBITE OF SCREAM)

SIEGEL: ...Horror Stories.

JIM MCLAUGHLIN: Hi, my name is Jim McLaughlin, and I live in Hershey, Pennsylvania. My wife, my sister, and our combined four children...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Book Reviews
3:54 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

'Five Star Billionaire' Shows The Human Cost Of Progress

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

The plot of Five Star Billionaire, with its multiple protagonists, may seem deceptively familiar: a neglected boy claws his way from rags to riches; a country girl tries to make her way in the city; a city girl tries to prove her worth in a man's world of business; a rock star falls victim to the fame machine; and a rich man tumbles from grace.

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Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems
3:25 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

At Cambodia Hotel, The Workers Are The Boss

Traffic passes in front of the Soria Moria Boutique Hotel in Siem Reap, Cambodia.
Will Baxter for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

This story is part of NPR's ongoing series about social entrepreneurs — people around the world who are dreaming up innovative ways to develop communities and solve social problems.

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