Discover Nature (Missouri Department of Conservation)

MDC Forest Pathologist Simeon Wright

Late spring evenings often bring the sound of buzzing and crashing at windows, doors, and porch lights. This week on Discover Nature, we’ll take a closer look at June bugs reappearing in Missouri.

Missouri Department of Conservation

In Missouri’s woods this time of year, there’s something new to see every day.

For weeks, redbud blooms have stolen the show, painting pink streaks through the understory, but this week, Missouri’s state tree takes the spotlight.

Missouri Department of Conservation

If you’ve ever spent any time floating a quiet Missouri stream, or exploring edges of lakes, ponds, or ditches, you’ve likely encountered the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii).

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, listen for the rattling calls of Belted Kingfishers (Ceryle alcyan) along streams.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Discover nature this week with a walk outdoors, and keep an eye out for blooming Eastern redbud trees (Cercis canadensis).

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week, on Discover Nature, take a walk outside, and you may hear one of the first serenades signifying spring on the horizon.


Missouri Department of Conservation

Fire plays an important role in all of our lives. To some, memories of campfires bring warm and pleasant feelings, while others remember the horrors of wildfires. This week on Discover Nature, we look at how fire is used as a land management tool.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Eastern cottontail rabbits begin birthing their first litters of the year this week.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Ducks and geese migrate north through Missouri as weather here warms and the season leans toward spring. Watch for Northern shovelers joining the northward flight this week.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Look skyward when traveling along Missouri’s highways and backroads and sooner or later you’ll likely see a large bird that's among the most efficient in flight. This week on Discover Nature we look for the turkey vulture.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, we take a look at Missouri’s cousin to the kangaroo.

Missouri Department of Conservation

In the waning weeks of winter, one of North America’s most important game fishes begins to get active in Missouri. This week on Discover Nature, walleye are on the move.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week in nature, keep an eye out for groundhogs. Also known as woodchucks, or whistle pigs, these rodents in the squirrel family are active during daylight hours, and are breeding now.

Missouri Department of Conservation

In the heart of winter, one Missouri shrub defies the dormant season. This week on Discover Nature, we’ll look for the Ozark witch hazel.

Missouri Department of Conservation

As temperatures freeze and thaw in late winter, one of the sweetest harvests awaits in the Missouri woods.  This week on Discover Nature, tap a tree, and collect a treat.


Missouri Department of Conservation

This winter, consider a style of hunting that doesn’t require any special equipment, and has no bag limit. This week on Discover Nature, head outdoors in search of deer sheds.

Missouri Department of Conservation

The holiday season continues, but as we enter the new year and Christmas trees come down, consider giving one more gift – to nature. Re-using cut Christmas trees can provide great habitat for fish, birds and other wildlife.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri’s resident and migratory bald eagle populations peak in the winter, and now is a great time to look for these iconic American raptors.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Did you know there are more than 200 species of woodpeckers in the world? This week on Discover Nature: look and listen for the seven species that call Missouri home.


Missouri Department of Conservation

Many Americans continue the European tradition of the Christmas tree. In Europe, people used spruces and firs to decorate their homes. This week on Discover Nature we look for another Missouri evergreen: the Eastern Red Cedar.

Missouri Department of Conservation

As colder air moves into Missouri this week, keep an eye to the sky for honking flocks of snow geese.

Missouri Department of Conservation

On a crisp Missouri night, take a walk in the woods and listen. You’ll likely hear one of our state’s most fascinating birds.  This week on Discover Nature, listen for owls courting in the woods. 

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week, in the United States, we give thanks.  For many of us, that involves a feast with friends and family. While the turkey may take center stage on the table this year, there’s often another seasonal delicacy nearby.

Missouri Department of Conservation

As food sources become harder to find in the winter, birds go looking for berries, grain and seed at home feeders.

Gail E. Rowley

The white-tailed deer grabs our attention in November, perhaps more than any other animal except the thanksgiving turkey.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, watch and listen for migrating waterfowl.

Glenn Chambers / Missouri Department of Conservation

Can you name a common Missouri animal that is also one of the least visible? This week on Discover Nature we learn more about beavers.

This week on Discover Nature, watch for spiders spinning silken webs, and “ballooning.”


Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, we’ll look for one of Missouri’s late-blooming native wildflowers. 

Missouri Department of Conservation

When people find baby snakes around their homes, they wonder, "Where did it come from? Is it poisonous? Will we find more?"

During late August, September and early October, young snakes are moving around, looking for hiding places, food or spots to hole up for the winter.  The majority of baby snakes people find are newly-hatched prairie kingsnakes, water snakes and black rat snakes, which most people call "black snakes."

 


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