Exam

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Education issues in mid-Missouri.

Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

One year after Peyton Head, former University of Missouri student body president, shared his experience of being called a racial slur on the MU campus on Facebook , leadership from the University of Missouri System and MU held a press conference to review the progress of the last year that began with student protests calling for systemic action against racism.

Columns at University of Missouri
File Photo / KBIA

There’s a class at the University of Missouri that everyone has to take. It’s called Exposition and Argument, but students and teachers usually strip it down to its “numerical name:” English 1000.

Donna Strickland, Director of Rhetoric and Composition, says that class is an environment that isn’t found many other places on campus.

“I mean these small classes where people can have these intimate conversations,” Strickland said.

Exam - Moberly Man Takes Special Olympics Coaching Beyond the Court

May 24, 2016
Ashley Reese

It was mid-afternoon and the athletes of the Magic City Olympians had just taken the court minutes after wolfing down their brown-bag lunches. Coach Jim Thornton stood on the sidelines, shouting tips to his athletes during their first game of the state-level Special Olympics competition. Many of the athletes spent the morning bowling at Fort Leonard Wood, and the exhaustion was starting to show on their faces.

University of Missouri System

The University of Missouri system approved a list of qualifications it is looking for in the next UM System President during the two day Board of Curators meeting on April 14 and 15 in Rolla. 

To create this list, the Presidential Search Committee held four public listening sessions at each of the UM System’s campuses. The April 6 session in Columbia took place after forums in Rolla and UMSL, but before the session at UMKC.  During the Columbia meeting, the Presidential Search Committee discussed what experiences, traits and qualities the next system president should have.

KBIA

Past graduates of the Missouri School of Journalism came together to talk with students, other journalists and aspiring writers about the process of writing during the first ever “Words Matter Writing Conference.” The conference took place from April 11 to April 15 and featured topics from magazine writing to freelance journalism.

The speakers at this conference recently had their stories published in Words Matter: Writing to Make a Difference, an anthology consisting of journalistic pieces and memoirs all from graduates of the Missouri School of Journalism. Mary Kay Blakely, one of the two editors of the book along with Amanda Dahling, got the idea for the anthology after she kept receiving pieces of writing from former students.

Columbia Public Schools

On April 5, Columbia voters will have their say on two measures that would impact Columbia Public School District’s finances.

During the upcoming municipal election, Columbia residents will decide whether to pass an operational tax levy increase and a $30 million dollar bond proposal for the Columbia Public School District. 

Columbia Public Schools spokesperson Michelle Baumstark said the levy increase and bond proposal are two very different things.

Ashley Szatala

The Missouri School of Journalism invited Nikole Hannah-Jones, an award winning journalist, to come to campus last month and spend the day with journalism students. The visit culminated in a talk for journalism students called “Covering racial injustice in the age of Black Lives Matter.”

When Hannah-Jones came to MU, she talked to students, faculty and staff in the journalism school about how to cover issues of race. She also talked about how she practices a blend of data-driven and narrative journalism.

Ryan Levi/KBIA

When Liam Theberge, a senior at Hickman High School, heard that the Columbia Board of Education was going to be talking about adding gender identity and gender expression to the District’s nondiscrimination policy last September, he knew he had to be at that meeting. “It was a really big and important topic for me, and I think a lot of incoming students and even current students needed to have their voice there,” Theberge said.

Kip Kendrick / Twitter

  In late January, Missouri House Rep. Kip Kendrick filed his first bill of this year’s state legislative session. Kendrick’s bill, the Student Debt Relief Act, would give Missouri college graduates the ability to refinance any student loans after graduation.

“Currently there are zero options to refinance student loans in the state of Missouri. So it’s about providing graduates and individuals working an option to be able to refinance and to lower rates, but then also to really make sure that the repayment issue is addressed,” Kendrick said.

Sarah Kellogg

The topics of diversity, inclusion and respect were the main ideas of and open session on February 5, although the University of Missouri’s Board of Curators discussed various topics related to the UM system during a series of meetings over the course of two days.

The Journey to a Multi-Million Dollar Donation

May 4, 2015
Abigail Coursen/KBIA

Large donations from alumni and supporters have become a major source of funding for universities.

Just in the last month the University Of Missouri School Of Music received a $10 million donation from Rex and Jeanne Sinquefield, while the University Of Missouri School Of Journalism received a $1 million donation on April 24.

But there’s a lot that goes into landing a major gift like these. Most of the time, it starts with a phone call.


EXAM: The Journey to a Multi-Million Dollar Donation

May 4, 2015
Abigail Coursen/KBIA

Large donations from alumni and supporters have become a major source of funding for universities. Just in the last month the University of Missouri School of Music received a $10 million donation from Rex and Jeanne Sinquefield, while the University of Missouri School of Journalism received a $1 million donation from Timothy Blair on April 24.

KBIA’s Abigail Coursen tells us about how a multi-million dollar donation to the University of Missouri comes to be.

Brady Finn/KBIA

Lincoln University in Jefferson City has entered into a partnership with the program Project SEARCH, which secures competitive employment for people with disabilities by partnering with several Missouri-based organizations to provide real-world opportunities for high school students. Throughout the school year, students work three internships that place them in various departments on campus.


Brady Finn/KBIA

Lincoln University in Jefferson City has entered a partnership with Project SEARCH which gives high school students with disabilities job training. KBIA’s Brady Finn takes you inside the school to figure out what jobs these students are working and what impact the program is making.  

Abigail Coursen/KBIA

The use of technology in classrooms is quickly becoming the new normal in education. At the beginning of this year the Columbia Public School District began issuing mini iPads to Battle High School students and to fifth graders at Mill Creek Elementary, through a program called “one-to-one.”

But with these advancements comes the question: how do parents, and even teachers who may not be familiar with modern tools, make sure students are using them to their fullest potential?


Abigail Coursen/KBIA

The use of technology in classrooms is quickly becoming the new norm in education. At the beginning of this year the Columbia Public School District began issuing mini iPads to Battle High School students and to fifth graders at Mill Creek Elementary, through a program called “one-to-one.” But how do parents, and even teachers who may not be familiar with modern tools, make sure students are using them to their advantage? KBIA’s Abigail Coursen went to the workshop sponsored by the local library to report on this story.


Mexico High School Teacher Accepts Teaching Award

Apr 17, 2015
Sydnee Stottlemyer/KBIA

The Missouri Alliance for Arts Education has awarded Mexico High School speech and theatre teacher Sara Given the creativity and Innovation in Teaching award. Given was recognized at the state capitol for creating the first ever Jellybean Speech Olympics competition. Given’s students who she affectionately calls her “Jellybeans” also performed at the capitol.


Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Indiana has drawn national attention for its religious freedom restoration act, and now Missouri lawmakers have two smaller scale bills on the table. The two bills, which are in the Missouri Senate and House could take away the ability of colleges and universities to police discrimination by religious student organizations.


Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Bills in the Missouri Senate and House would take away college and universities’ ability to police discrimination by religious student organizations. KBIA’s Kyle Norris has more on the bills and how college students around the state are reacting.

EXAM: Mexico High School Teacher Accepts Teaching Award at State Capitol

Apr 10, 2015
Sydnee Stottlemyer/KBIA

  The Missouri Alliance for Arts Education has awarded Mexico High School speech and theatre teacher Sara Given the creativity and Innovation in Teaching award. Given was recognized at the state capitol for creating the first ever Jellybean Speech Olympics competition. KBIA’s Sydnee Stottlemyer spoke with Given and her “Jellybeans” about why the Jellybeans Speech Olympics is more than just a competition.

Michaela Tucker/KBIA

Spring has arrived at Granny’s House. Kids threw footballs and ran around outside on Thursday afternoon. Granny’s House is a non-profit, supported by Columbia churches and businesses that provides a safe space for children who live in public housing from 3-6 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Pam Ingram and her husband Ellis, who are also known by “Granny” and “Poppy,” have run the program for 14 years. In addition to the after school program, the Ingrams coordinate other activities for the kids, like Science Club and Bible study.

Michaela Tucker/KBIA

Located in the center of the Douglass Housing Development in Columbia, Granny's House has served the neighborhood for 14 years. Run by Pam and Ellis Ingram, the program provides study groups about Christianity and a safe place for kids to be after school. Volunteers from churches and the University of Missouri's service learning program provide mentorship and guidance for the kids. KBIA's Michaela Tucker collected the sounds of an afternoon at Granny's House for this audio postcard. 

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson/KBIA

  In the past, alternative schools have been associated with their negative reputations. It’s typically understood as the place where the “bad kids” go. However, from the outside looking in, Frederick Douglass High School looks like the average school. But the reality is Douglass is not a typical school. It’s an alternative school. However, the school’s non-traditional approach to student learning started to catch wind. Douglass has broken down the barrier of stereotypes with the help of a cooking class and a teacher.


True/False

The True/False Film Fest wrapped up last week, bringing filmgoers from around the world to celebrate the year’s newest documentaries. The festival, which is in its 12th year, brings the intimate and harsh truths of storytelling to life. Although the festival mainly focuses on the films and their directors, local high school students were given the opportunity to dive into one of Columbia's richest traditions. KBIA's Marissanne Lewis-Thompson spoke with the festivals education director Polina Malikin about the importance of the film festival for students. 

EXAM: New MU Provost Focuses on Title IX Policies and Teacher Salaries

Mar 2, 2015
Andy Humphrey / KBIA

Newly hired University of Missouri Provost Garnett Stokes comes to her new position with many plans to improve the university’s academic programs.  Stokes led as provost and executive vice president at Florida State University and handled many situations involving Title IX regulations, teacher salaries, and research achievement.  As KBIA’s Andy Humphrey tells us, Stokes believes that she can use her prior experience to help solve various issues at MU.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

Nine high school students from Columbia, Jefferson City, Boonville and Osage Beach competed in this year’s central Missouri regional Poetry Out Loud competition at the Daniel Boone Regional Library last week.

Hickman High School student Shakira Cross recited the poem “Grief” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning as she gestures freely with her hands and arms.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

 

   Nine high school students from Columbia, Jefferson City, Boonville and Osage Beach competed in this year’s central missouri regional Poetry Out Loud competition at the Daniel Boone Regional Library last week. KBIA’s Hope Kirwan talked with the students, their teachers and parents about why this competition is about more than just reciting verse.

 

 

 

 

 

EXAM: MU’s Title IX Policies Cause Headaches and Confusion for Faculty and Staff

Feb 16, 2015
Adam Procter / flickr

In October, University of Missouri Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin sent out a mass email to students, faculty and staff explaining faculty and staff are mandatory reporters of any form of discrimination under new Title IX policies.

For many of these new mandatory reporters, their new responsibilities have caused some confusion and concern. An online training program was launched a few months after the initial announcement to try to help clear the air. But, the training has caused its own confusion and headaches as well.


Kyle Norris / KBIA

For the past ten years, Columbia Public Schools has continued to see an increase in total enrollment, adding about 150 students every year. Despite this growth, the school district has tried to maintain the same class size, turning to trailers to add more classrooms. KBIA’s Kyle Norris tells us how the school district hopes to move away from this temporary fix by creating a more permanent space for growing classes.

The University of Missouri is known for it’s School of Journalism. Every year, hundreds of freshmen from across the country come to school at MU to learn about news or sports broadcasting. But KBIA’s Jason Hoffman found one freshman who’s career in sports radio has an added challenge: He's blind.


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