Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.

AP

For more than two decades, China has moved from strength to strength. Its economic miracle has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty and dramatically increased the nation's global influence.

But recently China's growth has hit a major speed bump, weakening the Communist Party's major rationale for one-party rule . Meanwhile China faces new challenges in Hong Kong, Taiwan and the South China Sea. 

On this week's Global Journalist, a look at the leadership of President Xi Jinping and how China's greater place in the world has led to greater domestic and international challenges.


AP

After wars in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda killed nearly a million civilians, 120 nations came together to create what we know as the International Criminal Court. The goal: to prosecute those responsible for future genocides, crimes against humanity and other terrible war crimes.

But 13 years after it was created, the ICC has seen its share of controversy. Some African leaders are threatening to withdraw from the court for what they see as its unfair focus on prosecuting African cases. Others question the usefulness of a court that has convicted just two people in 13 years.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss the controversies surrounding a court set up to prosecute the world's worst criminals.


(RJI/Travis McMillen)

On a special edition of Global Journalist, Meredith Artley, editor in chief of CNN Digital, talks about the impact of social media on the news, competing with start-ups like BuzzFeed, and envisions a future of immersive news.

CNN Digital, the world's most viewed online news site in 2015, was recently awarded a Missouri Honor Medal for distinguished contributions to journalism.


On this special edition of Global Journalist, CBS News' White House correspondent Bill Plante examines the changes to the news business and the biggest stories of his 52-year career.

 Plante, a 2015 recipient of the Missouri Honor Medal and numerous other journalism awards, has covered every presidential campaign since 1968.  


(Travis McMillen/RJI)

Rea Hederman has twice left his mark on American journalism. In the 1970s and early 1980s he changed his family's flagship paper, The Clarion-Ledger of Jackson, Miss., from a voice for segregation and racism into a Pulitzer-winning force for change in the Deep South.

Since 1984, he's been the owner and publisher of the New York Review of Books, helping it maintain its place as one of the English-speaking world's preeminent intellectual publications even as technological change has shaken the industry.

Recently awarded a Missouri Honor Medal for distinguished service to journalism, Hederman speaks on this edition of Global Journalist about his conflict with his family in Mississippi and his efforts to ensure the New York Review of Books continues to thrive.  


(Travis McMillen)

In a special edition of Global Journalist, al-Jazeera's Director General Mostefa Souag addresses controversies that have shadowed the award-winning, Qatar-based news network as it tries to grow its U.S. presence.

During an extended interview, Souag responds to questions about the network's independence from the Qatari government, perceptions of anti-Semitic and anti-American bias and its famous interviews with Osama bin Laden.


AP

At first glance, the small West African nation of Equatorial Guinea is doing well. Its economic output per capita is similar to that of Portugal or the Czech Republic. But much of the population lives in poverty comparable to that in Ethiopia or war-ravaged South Sudan. 

On this edition of Global Journalist we bring you a look inside Equatorial Guinea, where oil has enriched the ruling family of one of Africa's longest-serving dictators but not the country's people.


AP

The Paris agreement on reducing greenhouse gas emissions has led to new hope that the worst effects of climate change may be avoided.

On this edition of Global Journalist, our guests analyze the climate agreement and discuss the prospects for keeping Earth's temperature from rising by 2 degrees Celsius, the point at which dramatic changes to the Earth are inescapable.


(EPA)

A year after Scots voted on whether to leave the United Kingdom, the regional parliament in Catalonia has approved a plan to secede from Spain by 2017.

Spain's constitutional court has ruled the plan illegal and most of Spain's major political parties have united against letting Catalans have a referendum on secession. That's wrought anger in a region where Catalans already see Madrid as hostile to their interests, and spooked investors in a country hit hard by Europe's debt crisis. 


AP

Eritrea is sometimes described as "the North Korea of Africa." And it's a deserved title.

The tiny nation, located on the continent’s northeastern coast bordering Ethiopia, Sudan, and Djibouti is ranked dead last out of 180 countries on Reporters’ Without Borders’ World Press Freedom Index. All privately-owned media outlets were shuttered more than a decade ago. In 2015, Eritreans were by far the largest source of African migrants making the dangerous Mediterranean crossing into Europe.


AP

Christianity might have gotten its start in the Middle East, but the region’s Christian minority is finding the area more and more dangerous when it comes to practicing their beliefs.

The rise of the Islamic State has only exacerbated the problem. When ISIS captured the mainly Christian city of Qaraqosh in northern Iraq last year, the remaining civilian population was given the choice: convert to Islam; pay a special tax; or face execution. Other Christian settlements were given the same choice.

Since the start of the Syrian civil war, about one-third of that country’s 1.8 million Christians have fled. In Iraq there are perhaps 500,000 Christians remaining, down from 1.5 million in 2003.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the future of Christianity in the Middle East.

AP

India's media environment reflects the country's enormous diversity. There are 90,000 print outlets and more than 700 television stations that carry vibrant debate of government policies. But on a number of fronts, freedom of expression and freedom of the press is under threat. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look inside India’s ongoing struggle with press freedom.

AP

Voters in Myanmar will go to the polls Nov. 8 to elect a parliament in what will be a milestone in the country's transition from military rule to democracy.

Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy has drawn large rallies in the run-up to the poll. However it remains to be seen how the southeast Asian country's first freely-elected parliament will work with the country's generals.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’ll preview the elections in Myanmar to see if they’ll help democracy finally take hold, and examine how the media climate there is shaping its politics.


AP

  Turkish voters will go to the polls Nov. 1 amid a spasm of political violence and renewed conflict with Kurdish guerrillas. The vote also comes just weeks after the most deadly terrorist attack in Turkish history and as the army is struggling to keep the civil war in Syria from spilling over into Turkey.

Despite a government crackdown on independent media President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's ruling AKP party may struggle to win a parliamentary majority. On this week's edition of Global Journalist, we discuss Turkey's election and whether the country, once a democratic model in the Middle East, is sliding towards authoritarianism.

AP

After a massive corruption scandal rocked Guatemalan politics this summer, Central America's most populous country goes to the polls Oct. 25.

With much of the political establishment discredited, TV comic Jimmy Morales is now the front runner. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Guatemalan politics, corruption and the legacy of the country's civil war in the 1980s.


AP

After a massive corruption scandal rocked Guatemalan politics this summer, Central America's most populous country goes to the polls Oct. 25.

With much of the political establishment discredited, TV comic Jimmy Morales is now the front runner. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Guatemalan politics, corruption and the legacy of the country's civil war in the 1980s.


AP

For 50 years Marxist rebels from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as the FARC, have battled that country’s government in Latin America’s longest-running insurgency.

During that time, more than 200,000 people have been killed, including 177,000 civilians, and about 5.7 million Colombians have been displaced from their homes by the fighting.

But in September the Colombian government and the FARC signed a draft peace agreement at a meeting in Cuba to end what many have viewed as an intractable conflict. 

AP

Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian has been imprisoned in Iran since July 2014. On this edition of Global Journalist, we examine how Iran's internal politics and relations with the U.S. have led to the lengthy jailing of a correspondent for a major U.S. newspaper. 

AP

At first glance, the small West African nation of Equatorial Guinea is doing well. Sandwiched between Cameroon and Gabon on the Gulf of Guinea, the oil-rich nation of 820,000 has a per capita GDP equivalent to that of the Czech Republic or Portugal. But the picture is more complicated than that.

Much of its population lives in conditions similar to that in the world’s poorest countries.

On this edition of Global Journalist a look inside Equatorial Guinea, where oil has enriched its leaders but not its people.

Nonoy Espina / National Union of Journalists of the Philippines

In November 2009 in the Philippines, a convoy of dozens of journalists, lawyers and political activists were traveling to register an opposition candidate for governor of a province called Maguindanao.

The group of cars were stopped on the road by armed men in broad daylight. Fifty-eight people from the convoy were then shot to death, including 32 journalists and media workers. Six years later, no one has been convicted of the mass-killing. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, the legacy of the Maguindanao massacre and a look at why reporters are killed with impunity in the Philippines.

Gregorio Borgia / AP

Next week is an historic one for Pope Francis. He’ll make his first trip to the United States since becoming pope in March 2013. He’ll visit President Obama in Washington D.C., stop by a high school in a poor section of New York, and attend a Catholic families conference in Philadelphia.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the effect of his papacy inside and outside the Roman Catholic church.

Bram Janssen / AP

With more than 30 million people spread across Turkey, Syria, Iraq and Iran, they are a minority everywhere they live.

Now Kurdish groups are battling both the Islamic State  and forces loyal to Bashar al-Assad as well as Turkey, a key U.S. ally. 

On this edition of Global Journalist: a deeper look at the role of the Kurds in the swirling conflicts of the Middle East.

Travis McMillen

In a special edition of Global Journalist, al-Jazeera's top executive Mostefa Souag addresses controversies that have shadowed the award-winning news network as it tries to grow its U.S. presence. Souag responds to questions about the network's independence from the Qatari government, perceptions of anti-Semitic and anti-American bias and its famous interviews with Osama bin Laden.

Courtesy NPR

As a co-host of NPR's flagship "All Things Considered," Audie Cornish's voice is heard by 12 million people everyday. On a special edition of Global Journalist, she takes us behind the scenes of one of the most influential radio shows in the U.S. and talks about the future of public radio.

Yannis Liakos / AP Photo

Greece's last two bailouts failed to rescue the country. This week, European leaders approved a new $95 billion package for the debt-stricken country. For Greeks, it means more tax hikes and cuts to pensions and other public spending–an option they soundly rejected in a nonbinding referendum in July. Still some argue that this bailout is different than the previous two – and that it may set the country on the path to recovery.

AP

For more than 20 months, the world watched as the five permanent members of the UN Security Council and Germany hammered out a deal with Iran regarding its nuclear program. On this edition of Global Journalist, we take a look at the lessons learned in the global effort to halt the spread of nuclear weapons.

Magali Girardin / EPA

Eritrea is sometimes described as "the North Korea of Africa." And it's a deserved title.

Courtesy photo

You see them on the battlefields patrolling the front lines and risking their lives.

But they are not soldiers, at least not in the traditional sense. They’re war correspondents. These brave men and women travel to the most dangerous parts of the globe, all for the story.

For many journalists, covering one war is enough. But there’s a small group of reporters and photographers who have made it their career to jump from one war to another.

Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP Photo

We're covering two issues on this edition of Global Journalist.

First, Jason McLure interviews Saw Yan Naing (@yannaingsaw), a journalist from Myanmar. He's in the United States as part of the Alfred Friendly Fellowship Program, which creates partnerships between American media outlets and journalists from around the world.

Fernando Llano / AP

Venezuela is a country that should, by all accounts, be doing quite well. It’s one of the top oil-producing countries in the world.

But the South American nation also has one of the highest murder rates in the world, a government whose officials are accused of selling drugs, and millions living below the poverty line. Not only that, the country's economy is crumbling, and the government is notorious for clamping down on journalists who challenge it on these issues.

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