Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.

Travis McMillen/RJI

    

Journalists in Turkey and South Africa both work in countries with lively and well-established media. But in both countries, long-running single-party rule has led to challenges for reporters.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg talks about these issues and more with journalists from the two countries visiting the U.S. on fellowships from the Alfred Friendly Press Partners.  

AP Images

Fifty years ago Chinese Premier Mao Zedong ignited the Cultural Revolution, one of the strangest and most controversial periods in China's history.

The movement began out of Mao's concern the country was straying from Communist dogma. But it eventually became a purge that shut down the nation's schools and universities and led to the imprisonment and 'reeducation' of millions of people viewed as intellectual or bourgeois, including future premier Deng Xiaoping.

The revolution spurred an economic crisis and left about 1.5 million dead before it ended in the 1970s. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the Cultural Revolution and its impact on modern China.


AP

Sherpa guides and porters do much of the work of getting hikers up Everest. But despite doing an incredibly dangerous job in a lucrative industry, they receive just a small fraction of the money $300 million annually generated by Everest expeditions.

On this edition, filmmaker Jennifer Peedom talks to Global Journalist about 'Sherpa,' her documentary about tensions on Mt. Everest.

  


Travis McMillen / RJI

At first glance, media in Pakistan and the Ukraine have little in common.

But in both the South Asian nation and the former Soviet republic, independent private news outlets are relatively new and face a host of challenges both from government restrictions and outside actors. They're also among the most dangerous countries in the world for journalists.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, we interview journalists from prominent media outlets in each country who are visiting the U.S. on fellowships from the University of Missouri-based Alfred Friendly Press Partners.


AP

It’s said that truth is often the first casualty in war. And for media in the Palestinian territories–where conflict has been the norm for more than six decades– giving the public an accurate picture of the news is a huge challenge.

In Gaza, where Hamas rules, Palestinian journalists must toe the line or face consequences. In the West Bank, governed by the Fatah-dominated Palestinian Authority, reporters can face criminal charges for covering corruption or criticizing officials.

Meanwhile Israeli forces have become increasingly aggressive towards Palestinian journalists, sometimes placing them in indefinite "administrative detention" without trial.


AP Photo

Brazil's senate vote to begin an impeachment trial against suspended President Dilma Rousseff is a turning point in the country's democracy.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a panel of Brazil experts debate and discuss whether Rousseff's impeachment is a step out of political crisis, or a step towards a constitutional abyss.


AP

The fight against the Islamic State isn’t just taking place on the ground or in the skies of Iraq or Libya. It’s also on the internet.

The Islamic State has used apps like Twitter, WhatsApp and Telegram to recruit new jihadists, instill fear in opponents and even provoke strangers to launch lone-wolf terror attacks in the U.S. and elsewhere.

But could it also hack our electrical grid or our checking accounts?

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the new war against the Islamic State being fought on laptops and smartphones.


AP Photo

Thailand is the world's third-largest exporter of seafood, shipping shrimp, tuna and other fish to supermarket chains and pet food companies in the U.S. and Europe.

But a series of investigations by the Associated Press and other news agencies have highlighted a pervasive problem in the Thai fishing industry: the use of slave labor from people tricked or kidnapped into working at sea. 


AP Photo

Twenty years after Europe's bloodiest war since World War II, Bosnia is a country riven by ethnic divisions and poverty.

After its recent application to join the European Union, Bosnians and their leaders will have to confront their political divisions and the systemic corruption that has thwarted efforts to make it a functioning democracy.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Bosnia's halting recovery from civil war and the challenges of transforming a dysfunctional government. 


AP

In June, the United Kingdom will vote on whether it will remain part of the European Union.

For those who want out, the so-called “Brexit” would allow the U.K. to better control immigration and free it from onerous EU regulations. But opponents say it would devastate the the U.K. economy, with accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers saying it would cost the the country 142 billion dollars and almost one million jobs in the next four years.  

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the potential benefits and drawbacks of the UK leaving the EU, as well as what happens if the referendum fails.


European Press Agency

After Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from Libya in 2011, there was hope for a peaceful and democratic future in one of Africa's largest oil-producers.

Five years later, the country is divided among warring militias. Amid the power vacuum, the Islamic State has gained a foothold from which to launch terror attacks and human traffickers have made Libya a major transshipment point for migrants to Europe.

On this week's edition of Global Journalist, a look at how Libya came apart and how it may be put back together.


AP

The Arab Spring toppled long-ruling autocrats across the Arab world. But with Libya in chaos, Egypt back under military rule and Syria and Yemen engulfed in war, only Tunisia has fulfilled the promise of its revolution.

With a new constitution, successful elections, and a Nobel Peace Prize for pro-democracy groups, there is much to celebrate. Yet Tunisia also faces major economic challenges and a growing threat from the Islamic State's Libya outpost.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the lone democracy to emerge from the Arab revolutions of 2011 and 2012.

AP

A little more than six years ago, Haiti was devastated by a massive 7.0 magnitude earthquake, killing more than 100,000 people and causing widespread damage.

In those six years, billions of dollars of aid has flowed into the country, but many of the functions of government are still carried out by foreign-funded aid agencies.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we look at Haiti's slow recovery from the devastating quake and discuss whether its weak government can begin taking over the work done by international relief agencies that have led some to call Haiti "the Republic of NGOs."


Dai Kurokawa / EPA

Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza's announcement in April that he would seek a third five-year term set off a year of instability in the central African nation that has left hundreds dead and forced a quarter million people from their homes.

With reports of opposition militias training refugees in camps in neighboring Rwanda and Nkurunziza's government using coded language to suggest the opposition is a Tutsi attempt to grab power, fears are rising that Burundi could descend into the ethnic bloodletting that killed 300,000 during the 1993-2005 civil war.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a discussion of the renewed instability in a region with a history of ethnic cleansing and genocide.


AP

Russia is no stranger to conflicts, but under Vladimir Putin its most enduring one may be the war over news and information. Over the past decade the Kremlin has tightened control over television and the Internet.

Outside Russia, it’s also sought to offer its own version of the news in English and other languages. This is often an anti-American narrative about conflicts in Syria, Ukraine and elsewhere in Eastern Europe at odds with news from other agencies.

Online, allies of the Kremlin have reportedly hired hundreds if not thousands of so-called “trolls” to spread disinformation on social media and in the comments section of news sites.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Russia’s information offensive.


AP

For months now, the world has watched as more than a million refugees and migrants from countries like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan have risked their lives to try and find safe haven in Europe.

But this influx has created enormous tensions in the European Union about how many newcomers to accept and which countries should take them. Governments in Sweden and Germany have each taken in hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants–and taken criticism both from other European states and their own people.

So, who foots the bill for settling the hundreds of thousands of immigrants? And if no one, where will these people go?


AP

The conflict in Syria gets the headlines, but 2,000 miles south in Yemen a separate civil war has brought an already impoverished country to its knees.

More than 80 percent of the country's population is in need of humanitarian aid - aid many can't get because of the fighting.

As Shia rebels backed by Iran have battled the country's Saudi Arabia-backed Sunni government, al-Qaida and the Islamic State have taken advantage of the chaos to expand their influence.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the humanitarian and political crisis in Yemen and the threat posed by international extremist groups in the country.


AP

The sharp decline in oil prices over the past 18 months is good news for consumers in many countries. But in oil exporting countries in the Mideast it's leading to layoffs, higher taxes and sharp cuts in government services.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the losers from the 70 percent drop in oil prices over the past two years.


AP

 

For much of its population, Somalia is a difficult and dangerous place to live.

It’s particularly true for reporters. Practicing journalism in a failed state means facing threats from any number of militia groups.

That includes Islamist radicals from al-Shabaab as well as from armed groups loyal to Somalia’s internationally-backed government in Mogadishu. At least 59 Somali journalists have been killed since 1992-the year after the fall of dictator Siad Barre threw the country into chaos.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the state of journalism in Somalia.


AP

For more than two decades, China has moved from strength to strength. Its economic miracle has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty and dramatically increased the nation's global influence.

But recently China's growth has hit a major speed bump, weakening the Communist Party's major rationale for one-party rule . Meanwhile China faces new challenges in Hong Kong, Taiwan and the South China Sea. 

On this week's Global Journalist, a look at the leadership of President Xi Jinping and how China's greater place in the world has led to greater domestic and international challenges.


AP

After wars in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda killed nearly a million civilians, 120 nations came together to create what we know as the International Criminal Court. The goal: to prosecute those responsible for future genocides, crimes against humanity and other terrible war crimes.

But 13 years after it was created, the ICC has seen its share of controversy. Some African leaders are threatening to withdraw from the court for what they see as its unfair focus on prosecuting African cases. Others question the usefulness of a court that has convicted just two people in 13 years.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss the controversies surrounding a court set up to prosecute the world's worst criminals.


(RJI/Travis McMillen)

On a special edition of Global Journalist, Meredith Artley, editor in chief of CNN Digital, talks about the impact of social media on the news, competing with start-ups like BuzzFeed, and envisions a future of immersive news.

CNN Digital, the world's most viewed online news site in 2015, was recently awarded a Missouri Honor Medal for distinguished contributions to journalism.


On this special edition of Global Journalist, CBS News' White House correspondent Bill Plante examines the changes to the news business and the biggest stories of his 52-year career.

 Plante, a 2015 recipient of the Missouri Honor Medal and numerous other journalism awards, has covered every presidential campaign since 1968.  


(Travis McMillen/RJI)

Rea Hederman has twice left his mark on American journalism. In the 1970s and early 1980s he changed his family's flagship paper, The Clarion-Ledger of Jackson, Miss., from a voice for segregation and racism into a Pulitzer-winning force for change in the Deep South.

Since 1984, he's been the owner and publisher of the New York Review of Books, helping it maintain its place as one of the English-speaking world's preeminent intellectual publications even as technological change has shaken the industry.

Recently awarded a Missouri Honor Medal for distinguished service to journalism, Hederman speaks on this edition of Global Journalist about his conflict with his family in Mississippi and his efforts to ensure the New York Review of Books continues to thrive.  


(Travis McMillen)

In a special edition of Global Journalist, al-Jazeera's Director General Mostefa Souag addresses controversies that have shadowed the award-winning, Qatar-based news network as it tries to grow its U.S. presence.

During an extended interview, Souag responds to questions about the network's independence from the Qatari government, perceptions of anti-Semitic and anti-American bias and its famous interviews with Osama bin Laden.


AP

At first glance, the small West African nation of Equatorial Guinea is doing well. Its economic output per capita is similar to that of Portugal or the Czech Republic. But much of the population lives in poverty comparable to that in Ethiopia or war-ravaged South Sudan. 

On this edition of Global Journalist we bring you a look inside Equatorial Guinea, where oil has enriched the ruling family of one of Africa's longest-serving dictators but not the country's people.


AP

The Paris agreement on reducing greenhouse gas emissions has led to new hope that the worst effects of climate change may be avoided.

On this edition of Global Journalist, our guests analyze the climate agreement and discuss the prospects for keeping Earth's temperature from rising by 2 degrees Celsius, the point at which dramatic changes to the Earth are inescapable.


(EPA)

A year after Scots voted on whether to leave the United Kingdom, the regional parliament in Catalonia has approved a plan to secede from Spain by 2017.

Spain's constitutional court has ruled the plan illegal and most of Spain's major political parties have united against letting Catalans have a referendum on secession. That's wrought anger in a region where Catalans already see Madrid as hostile to their interests, and spooked investors in a country hit hard by Europe's debt crisis. 


AP

Eritrea is sometimes described as "the North Korea of Africa." And it's a deserved title.

The tiny nation, located on the continent’s northeastern coast bordering Ethiopia, Sudan, and Djibouti is ranked dead last out of 180 countries on Reporters’ Without Borders’ World Press Freedom Index. All privately-owned media outlets were shuttered more than a decade ago. In 2015, Eritreans were by far the largest source of African migrants making the dangerous Mediterranean crossing into Europe.


AP

Christianity might have gotten its start in the Middle East, but the region’s Christian minority is finding the area more and more dangerous when it comes to practicing their beliefs.

The rise of the Islamic State has only exacerbated the problem. When ISIS captured the mainly Christian city of Qaraqosh in northern Iraq last year, the remaining civilian population was given the choice: convert to Islam; pay a special tax; or face execution. Other Christian settlements were given the same choice.

Since the start of the Syrian civil war, about one-third of that country’s 1.8 million Christians have fled. In Iraq there are perhaps 500,000 Christians remaining, down from 1.5 million in 2003.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the future of Christianity in the Middle East.

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