Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure and Casey Morell, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.

khadija
Aziz Karimov / AP Photo

This episode of Global Journalist is audio only.

With the recent arrest of Azeri investigative reporter Khadija Ismayilova, we look at Azerbaijan's crackdowns on journalists, and whether there's hope for the future. Our guests:

What happened to #BringBackOurGirls?

Dec 11, 2014
bringbackourgirls
Ben Curtis / AP Photo

This episode of Global Journalist is audio only.

Remember the social media campaign #BringBackOurGirls? It was meant to draw attention to the kidnapping of 276 Nigerian girls, who were taken from their school in April by Boko Haram, an Islamic militant group based in northern Nigeria. A few of the girls were either able to escape, or were released. But, the international attention once given to the story has largely dissipated, and 219 of the schoolgirls are still missing. This week on Global Journalist, we look at Boko Haram, the #BringBackOurGirls campaign, and what steps are being taken to combat Islamic extremism in Nigeria. 

After Iguala, what's next for Mexico?

Dec 4, 2014
mexico-protest
Eduardo Verdugo / AP Photo

Earlier this year, you may have heard of an incident in a small city in Mexico, where a group of 43 teaching students disappeared. The men who vanished in September were studying at a rural college called Ayotzinapa Normal School. On September 26, more than 100 students from the school had been protesting teacher hiring practices and funding for teachers’ colleges in the nearby city of Iguala. This week on Global Journalist, we look at the investigation, and what effect the disappearances have had in Mexico. Our guests:

unclos-protestors-ap
Aaron Favila / AP Photo

We’re all familiar with border disputes on land … but what about those on the water? Maritime disputes in the Arctic and in the South China Sea are increasing, as countries vie for valuable natural resources beneath the ocean’s waves. Current international law sets strict guidelines on what economic rights countries have off their coasts. But, is the system in place the best one? Is the International Law of the Sea still sufficient today?

Indigenous land rights in Australia

Nov 20, 2014
australia-aboriginal
Mark Baker / AP Photo

Throughout the world, indigenous people are fighting for the right to reclaim land they lost due to European territorial expansion, colonialism, or to other means. One place where this debate has been ongoing is Australia. There, Aboriginal peoples and other indigenous people have fought for years to advance their native land claims — with resistance from the government and mining and energy companies. This week on Global Journalist, we’ll talk about some other land disputes between Aboriginal peoples and Australia’s federal & provincial governments. Our guests:

Indonesia's new man in charge

Nov 13, 2014
jokowi
Tatan Syuflana / AP Photo

On 20 October, Joko Widodo took office as Indonesia's new president. Jokowi, as he is popularly known, is the first Indonesian president without a military background or from an elite political family. What challenges does he face as president?

Our guests:

Ebola epidemic continues

Nov 6, 2014
Michael Duff / AP

Since our last program on Ebola, the death toll from the disease has more than doubled to 4,800. U.S. and Spanish aid workers sickened by Ebola also transmitted it to medical workers in the U.S. and in Spain - causing widespread media coverage - and leading people to talk of an epidemic of “Fear-Bola.” But there is good news. The West African nation of Liberia has been hardest hit by the disease, with an estimated 6,500 cases. But last week the country reported just 89 new probable cases.

Book talk: "Arab Women Rising" (rebroadcast)

Oct 30, 2014
arab-women
Ahmed AlFardan / NurPhoto/Sipa USA (Sipa via AP Images)

This episode originally aired in August 2014.  

Censorship in Turkey

Oct 23, 2014
turkey protest
Emrah Gurel / AP Photo

  After 11 years as prime minister, Recip Tayyip Erdogan became Turkey's first directly-elected president in August. Under Erdogan’s tenure, Turkey’s economy has grown significantly. The country’s main minority group, the Kurds, have gained new rights. And a military with a history of meddling in politics has been kept in its barracks. But press freedom groups like Reporters Without Borders and the Committee to Protect Journalists have consistently criticized efforts by Erdogan’s AK Party to limit freedom of expression and of the press.

International sex trafficking

Oct 16, 2014
trafficking
Anindito Mukherjee / EPA

Given the nature of this discussion, listener discretion is advised.

On this week's show, we are looking at sex trafficking of children around the world, and how the media covers this problem. In September 2012, the Times of London first reported that police in the English city of Rotherham had covered up a series of sexual abuses against children that took place from 1997 onward. The British government then commissioned a report to investigate the claims, and to examine the police's handling of the allegations. The report was published in August. It found that at least 1,400 children had been victimized in Rotherham, and that both the police and the local government knew about the abuse, but did nothing to act on it. While this story attracted international attention for its scope and scale, it is sadly just one of many instances of child sex trafficking and victimization that takes place throughout the world. Journalists often struggle to cover these types of stories, not only due to sensitivities surrounding child sexual abuse, but because finding accurate information about the cases can be hard to find. 

The psychology of foreign jihadis

Oct 9, 2014
foreign-jihad
Sherin Zada / AP Photo

This week on Global Journalist, we look, once again, at the Islamic State and the ongoing fighting in the Middle East. Recent videos from the militant group have featured people not from the West fighting for ISIS' cause. To that point, videos depicting the beheading of American journalists and a British aid worker have highlighted a British person who describes what ISIS is fighting for before he executes the group's captives. But what makes someone who was born in the west and was educated in the west decide to fight for a group that wants to destroy the west?

What's happening in Hong Kong?

Oct 2, 2014
hong kong protests
Wong Maye-E / AP Photo

On this week's show, we are looking at the protests in Hong Kong that have attracted worldwide attention. Students and citizens alike have been protesting China's decision to manage the region's 2017 general election. Back in the 1980s, the United Kingdom and China negotiated a treaty that ceded Hong Kong back to China. According to that treaty, the people who run Hong Kong's government are, eventually, to be selected through universal suffrage. In 2007, it was decided that the 2017 election would be the first to meet that criteria. Protesters say that what China has proposed, though, falls far short of universal suffrage. China wants to pre-select candidates for Hong Kong's government based on guidelines it sets, instead of allowing any candidate run for any position. This week on Global Journalist, we look at the protests and the situation in Hong Kong, and what it could mean for the region's future. 

islamic-state-still
Courtesy of VICE

On this week's program, we are looking at VICE. No – not the bad habits we all have – but the media organization that is challenging common perceptions of what is and isn't journalism. Our guests:

Ebola in West Africa

Sep 18, 2014
ebola treatment
Kjell Gunnar Beraas, MSF / AP Photo

There has been a lot of media coverage lately dedicated to the spread of the Ebola virus in Africa, which is estimated to have killed at least 2,300 people. The outbreak began in December 2013, when the first cases of Ebola virus were reported in Guinea, located in western Africa. Since then, the disease has spread to neighboring Senegal and Sierra Leone, and from there to Liberia. Both the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization, warn that unless immediate action is taken quickly, the outbreak could become unmanageable.

alfred friendly partners
Alfred Friendly Press Partners

In 1983, journalist Alfred Friendly launched an exchange program with journalists all over the world. The Alfred Friendly Press Partners fellowship brings a group of foreign journalists to the United States for work experience and journalistic training they might not get in their home countries. The experience also allows these journalists to find links between the communities they work in here in the U.S., and those they come from.

alfred friendly partners
Alfred Friendly Press Partners

In 1983, journalist Alfred Friendly launched an exchange program with journalists all over the world. The Alfred Friendly Press Partners fellowship brings a group of foreign journalists to the United States for work experience and journalistic training they might not get in their home countries. The experience also allows these journalists to find links between the communities they work in here in the U.S., and those they come from.

Child labor in Bolivia

Aug 28, 2014
child labor in bolivia
Juan Karita / AP Photo

In July, Bolivia passed a new child labor law that attracted a great deal of international attention. The South American country made it legal for children who are at least 10 years old to go to work. This goes against a United Nations convention which, for the most part, sets 14 as the minimum age at which one can start to work.

Book talk: "Arab Women Rising"

Aug 21, 2014
arab-women
Ahmed AlFardan / NurPhoto/Sipa USA (Sipa via AP Images)

Following the Arab Spring, gender equality between men and women in the Middle East is improving. Women today have more opportunities, both in business and in society, than they did in previous years. Two journalists set out to learn just how the landscape has changed for Arab women, and have published their stories in a book called Arab Women Rising. On Global Journalist, we talk to the authors of the book about their project, and what they found. Our guests:

The immigration debate

Aug 14, 2014
immigration protest
Connor Radnovich / AP Photo

This summer, President Obama has lobbied Congress to enact immigration reforms, with the hope of reducing illegal immigration and streamlining the process through which people move to the United States. Much of the discussion has centered around children immigrating to the US from Central and South America, who often come unaccompanied with the hope that their families will be able to join them at a later date. This week on Global Journalist, we look at the issue of immigration, the current discourse surrounding it, and what could happen next. Our guests:

Hasan Raza / AP Photo

Fifteen months ago, a fire at a garment factory in Bangladesh killed more than 100 people and injured at least a further 200. The factory provided clothing for U-S retailers like Walmart, among others, and had been cited by Walmart as having potentially unsafe conditions for workers. In response to the tragedy, the U.S. government revoked trade privileges with Bangladesh, and the country is trying to get them back.

russia-pipeline
Sergei Karpukhin, Pool / Associated Press

Note: this episode originally aired on 1 May 2014.

This week, we're looking at the increasingly complex state of energy politics in Eastern Europe. Conflicts between Russia, which supplies much of the region's natural gas, and its neighbors are escalating. The United States government has increased sanctions on the Russian energy sector in response to the country's actions in Crimea and the Ukraine. How have markets been reacting to this? What does it mean for the area's balance of power?

Joining us this week:

Rex Features via AP Images

In September, voters in Scotland will participate in a unique referendum. They will decide whether or not Scotland should secede from the United Kingdom and become its own, independent country. Supporters of the referendum, led by advocacy group Yes Scotland, say that Scotland should have greater control over what goes on within its borders, like how its tax revenues are spent and how its economic policies are crafted.

Conflict between Israel, Hamas intensifies

Jul 17, 2014
palestine-conflict
Khalil Hamra / AP Photo

For the third time in six years, major fighting has broken out between Israel and Hamas. Last month, three Israeli teens were abducted and killed in the West Bank, an attack Israel blamed on Hamas. Hamas denied responsibility for the murders. In apparent retaliation, a Palestinian teenager was kidnapped and set alight, allegedly by Israelis who have subsequently been arrested for the crime. Israel and Hamas have launched rocket attacks against each other, with Israeli rockets killing nearly 200 Palestinians in Gaza, and Hamas' rockets wounding almost 30 Israelis.

kenya
AP Photo

The militant group Al Shabaab has wreaked havoc across Africa throughout this decade. A cell of Al Qaeda, the group has launched attacks on civilians throughout Somalia, Kenya and Uganda, and is responsible for the deaths of thousands of people. This past weekend, 29 people were killed in Kenya by armed militants; Al Shabaab claimed responsibility for the attacks soon after. Today on Global Journalist, we look at the rise of Al Shabaab, its attacks in the region, and what the group's emergence means for Africa. Our guests:

The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images

In March 2011, an earthquake and tsunami devastated the eastern coast of Japan. Thousands of people were killed, and scores more were displaced as a result of the natural disaster. The earthquake and resulting tsunami caused the meltdown of a nuclear power station located in Fukushima Prefecture. Radioactive material leaked into the Pacific Ocean, and the area surrounding the plant became irradiated. This led to the development of an exclusion zone around the plant, and the evacuation of cities near the stricken nuclear site.

Sergei Chuzavkov / AP Photo

This week, our focus turns, once again, to Ukraine. Since the Euromaidan movement at the end of 2013, clashes between pro-Russian and anti-Russian groups have intensified throughout eastern Ukraine. The United Nations estimates that more than 400 people have been killed in eastern Ukraine since this April, and that more than 46,000 have fled their homes. Journalists have also been attacked. Vice News correspondent Simon Ostrovsky was detained by unknown militants in the city of Sloviansk, and others have faced intimidation, threats and other pressures for trying to do their jobs.

ISIS wreaks havoc in Iraq

Jun 19, 2014
ISIS-in-iraq
Emad Matti / AP Photo

    

This week on Global Journalist, we look at the increasing turmoil in the MIddle East. The group known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, has taken control of two of Iraq's major cities and is moving toward the capital. In Syria, it controls much of the northern part of the country. We'll talk to those covering the conflict about the challenges thereof. We also take a look at free press in Afghanistan. Our guests:

Afghanistan's historic election

Jun 12, 2014
afghan-election
Rahmat Gul / AP Photo

Afghans head to the polls this weekend in the second round of their presidential election. It's slated to be the first democratic transition in Afghanistan's history, and the race is down to two candidates. Abdullah Abdullah is the country's former foreign minister, and came in second in the country's last presidential election in 2009. He won the first round of the election in the beginning of April, and is originally from the capital Kabul. His opponent is Ashraf Ghani, Afghanistan's former finance minister. He's from Logar in the eastern part of the country.

syria election ballot
Dusan Vranic / AP Photo

Incumbent president Bashar al-Assad won re-election in a contest many say was not free or fair.

This week on Global Journalist, we look at the results of the Syrian presidential election, and explore what Assad's victory means for the country.We also take a look at the west's response to the election, and how Syrian refugees are impacting neighboring countries like Lebanon.

Our guests:

petra-costa
Courtesy of Petra Costa

The Brazilian documentary Elena tells the story of an actress and artist who moved to New York in search of a career during the country's military dictatorship. This week, we talk to Petra Costa, director of Elena, about her film, Brazilian culture, and what's next for this growing international power.

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