Under the Microscope

Thursdays at 5:20pm, Fridays at 8:21am

KBIA's weekly look at science, technology, and health in Missouri and beyond. Find us on iTunes

Ways To Connect

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Pippa Hull sits on her mother’s lap across the kitchen table in their Parkville home. She is an outgoing and talkative seven-year-old girl, who just happens to have a rare and severe form of epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Pippa’s mother, Megan, said this form of epilepsy is characterized by its lack of response to treatments.

Hull said they have tried different medications, they have had a VNS or Vagus Nerve Stimulation device implanted in Pippa’s chest, and they have even tried a special diet to try and reduce the number of seizures Pippa experiences.

Drone above a field
Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

On this week's edition of Under the Microscope, we'll be taking a look at the new drone flight regulations proposed by  The Federal Aviation Administration. While the rules may limit some commercial potential for drones to be used in package delivery and pipeline inspection, many other industries are finding the new technology to be extremely lucrative, especially agricultural ones.  Harvest Public Media's Luke Runyon explores how the potential guidelines could "usher in a new era of farm machinery."


Conservation agents finish up overseeding a plot at the Prairie Fork Conservation Area outside of Williamsburg, Missouri.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Landscape diversity in Missouri has changed since its settlement in the 18th century. Where there was once prairies, forests and savannahs, in many cases there are now towns, cities and farms.

The Missouri Department of Conservation is working to remedy this problem by restoring prairies to “pre-settlement standards.” These standards include no non-native plant species and plants from within a 50 mile radius of the prairie.


CraneStation / Flickr

  On this week's Under the Microscope, scientists have noticed a change in the atmosphere.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

  On this week's Under the Microscope, farmed fish may soon have a certified organic alternative. 

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

  Hemp is grown throughout the world for its oil and fiber, which show up in everything from beauty products to rope.

Outer space
Sweetie187 / Flickr

  What if we could design a camera that could take a hundred billion pictures a second ― enough to record the fastest phenomena in the universe.

dnl777 / Flickr

On this week's Under the Microscope, pesticides are causing a problem for bees. 

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

  On this week's Under the Microscope, traffic jams caused by a large harvest. 

videocrab / Flickr

  On this week's Under the Microscope, how watching a movie affects your brain and seeds that have been passed down through generations. 

File / KBIA

On this week's Under the Microscope, water quality in Missouri does not meet federal regulations, a lawsuit over eggs between Missouri and California, and plant seeds kept in a mountain in case of a catastrophic event. 

University of Missouri Health Care

On this week's Under the Microscope, we look at a UV light emitting, germ-killing robot and the art of wool-making. 

Outer space
Sweetie187 / Flickr

On this week's Under the Microscope, we take a look at the junk we have left in space and a record-breaking harvest of corn and soybeans. 

drought farm field soybeans
Camille Phillips / Harvest Public Media

On this week's Under the Microscope, we are looking at The Farm Bill, a lawsuit regarding restrictions on cages for egg-laying hens, and labels on genetically modified foods. 

Amylovesyah / Flickr

 

MU's School of Veterinary Medicine is in the research phase with bacteria and molecules that could change the treatment of cancer. 

Amylovesyah / Flickr

On this week's Under the Microscope, we are looking into cancer research and a new hunting technology. 

App in Missouri helps hunters feel nostalgic

Oct 2, 2014
dishfunctional / Flickr

You may need a camo case for your smart phone now. Last week, the Missouri Department of Conservation released a hunting app. It lets hunters report their yield right from their phone. 

Missouri Department of Natural Resources

  On this week's Under the Microscope, Missouri is one of ten states at risk for sinkholes. 

cigarette
Sudipto_Sarkar / flickr

On this week's Under the Microscope, Springfield schools implement local foods in kids lunches and research from Washington University is shedding light on schizophrenia.

Michael Cote / flickr

A respiratory illness is sending hundreds of kids to hospitals in ten states, including Missouri.  

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Local food is no longer just a novelty. Farmers markets are growing nationwide and farms that sell directly to consumers brought in $1.3 billion in 2012, up eight percent from just five years earlier.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

  Welcome to Under the Microscope, KBIA's weekly at stories in science, health and technology. I'm Maureen Lewis-Stump

KBIA

  Columbia's sewer system is aging and deteriorating. The city council took steps to address the problem, but not without controversy. 

ambulance
Creative Commons / Flickr

  On this week's Under the Microscope, we take a look at Smart 911, an emergency service allowing 911 operators to obtain vital information for callers, and Missouri's plans to make old railways into trails. 

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Late summer in the Midwest is tomato season. And whether you’re shopping at the grocery store, a discount chain or your local farmer’s market, you’ll find the price varies for a plump, juicy tomato. 

Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

The Environmental Protection Agency released a proposed rule in June to cut carbon emissions by thirty percent by 2030. Since the announcement, a question has come up. How will the rule impact coal-fired power plants and coal-related industries?

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack recently announced $3.9 million in funding toward developing a vaccine for a disease crushing hog farms.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

For a long time, Texas was the center of cattle country. But drought is re-shaping the beef map and raising the price of steak. Ranchers are moving their herds from California to Colorado and from Texas to Nebraska by the thousands. They’re seeking refuge from dry weather and, as Harvest Public Media’s Grant Gerlock reports, cattle producers in the Midwest are making the most of it.

tractor on farmland
(tpsdav/pixabay)

Coming up we’ll take a look and how big data and agriculture are finding themselves intertwined with questions about privacy.

KBIA

Honeybee colonies have been dying off at alarming rates in recent years. In the Midwest, some people wonder if planting row after row of corn and soybeans may be part of the problem. Researchers in Iowa are trying to find out. Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer reports on one factor that may contribute to the grim situation for pollinators in the corn belt.

Nearly 130,000 homes were permitted to be built in Missouri last year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.  KBIA’s Morgan Dzakowic reports one unique house under construction in Columbia stands out among its neighbors.

Pages