Views of the News

Wednesdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Each week, KBIA brings you a roundtable discussion about the media. Host Amy Simons and regular panelists Mike McKean and Earnest Perry from the Missouri School of Journalism provide analysis, commentary and criticism. Subscribe to us on iTunes

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  A New York City high school student makes $72 million playing the stock market? The headline offered the promise of a story that was almost too good to be true. Turns out the teen, Mohammed Islam, made up the whole story. It joins an increasingly long list of prominent stories unraveling due to fact checking.  Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

Courtesy NBC

  When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including waterboarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  Are the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques torture? Former Vice President Dick Cheney gives Chuck Todd his definition of “torture” on Meet the Press. The Cosbys break their silence, MSNBC launches “The Shift” to test new programming online, and New York Magazine is duped by a high school student. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including water boarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. 

The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use.

via Flickr user Bob Mical

  

Rolling Stone has issued an apology for its November story, "A rape on campus: A brutal assault and struggle for justice at UVA," saying that the magazine didn't do enough in verifying an unidentified student's account of sexual assault. Was Sabrina Rubin Erdely's reporting flawed? Why didn't she interview the accused? What did the fact-checking look like on that article?  And, why did Rolling Stone quietly change its apology, removing the statement the magazine "misplaced" its trust in "Jackie?” 

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.

 

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via Flickr user Bob Mical

Rolling Stone has issued an apology for its November story, "A rape on campus: A brutal assault and struggle for justice at UVA," saying that the magazine didn't do enough in verifying an unidentified student's account of sexual assault. 

IMDB

The film, The Immitation Game, carries a PG-13 rating and The New York Times warns the film contains illicit sex, cataclysmic violence & advanced math?! Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

 


via Flickr user Gordon Correll

Comedian Chris Rock is on a publicity tour, promoting his new film Top Five. In multiple interviews Rock is asked about his reactions to the recent events in Ferguson and his take on racism in America. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Janay Rice speaks out

Dec 4, 2014
via Flickr user mdennes

On Friday, former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice won his appeal. A judge ruled the NFL’s indefinite suspension against him be vacated. In the wake of this news, ESPN released an essay written by Rice’s wife, Janay, who became a public figure after a video of an altercation between the two was leaked to the media. ESPN said no questions were off limits but final control over the essay and its publication was left up to Janay. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


Chris Rock tells New York magazine that white people are “less crazy than they used to be.” Why the actor-comedian’s remarks about race, Ferguson and President Obama are giving many reasons for pause. Janay Rice steadfastly stands behind her husband in interviews with ESPN and NBC, evidence suggests North Korea could be behind a computer hack that resulted in the leak of several new Sony Pictures movies, and why a New York Times movie review might have you thinking of math in a new light. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Gordon Correll

Comedian Chris Rock has been talking to reporters, doing a publicity tour for his new film, Top Five.  The timing has resulting in several questions about Ferguson,  the grand jury's decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson, the coverage of race in America, and the Obama presidency.

Frank Rick, New York: “In Conversation Chris Rock: What’s killing comedy. What’s saving America.

http://www.9jumpin.com.au/

  Karl Stefanovic, the anchor of Australia’s Today Show, wanted to see if anyone would notice if he wore the same blue suit for a year. No one noticed! Meanwhile, if his co-host wore the same outfit more than once a week, she got critical emails and calls from viewers. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

An executive of the app-based ride-sharing company, unhappy with critical media coverage, suggested it should dig up personal information about journalists and make it public. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

NPR’s Scott Simon asked Bill Cosby some pointed questions about allegations waged against him, but were the questions about sexual assault allegations or something else? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


NPR’s Scott Simon asked Bill Cosby some pointed questions about allegations waged against him, but were the questions about sexual assault allegations or something else?  An Uber executive unhappy about media coverage looks to dig up dirt on unfriendly journalists, the Orange County Register looks to reporters to take on paper delivery routes and why an Australian television anchor’s decision to wear the same suit every day for a year is earning him high praise from feminists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

NPR's Scott Simon had the first interview with actor-comedian Bill Cosby following the recent allegations of sexual assault against him.  Simon asked Cosby on Saturday Weekend Edition if he wanted to address those allegations.  

  Jake Gyllenhaal's character in the new movie 'Nightcrawler,' makes a name for himself shooting videos of crime scenes and selling them to news channels...but how much of that happens in real life? Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

glenn beck
The Blaze

Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck told fans that for the past few years, he’s been suffering from a mysterious neurological illness. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


#Pointergate

Nov 13, 2014

KSTP-TV accused the Minneapolis Mayor of throwing up gang signs after she was photographed with a black constituent. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    

 President Barack Obama challenges the FCC to regulate the internet service providers as it would a utility.  A win for net neutrality advocates and businesses such as Netflix and Hulu or a long-shot wish put upon an independent agency? Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck reveals he is suffering from a rare illness that has “quite honestly, made me look crazy.” Stephen Glass breaks his silence. And, how close to reality is Jake Gyllenhaal’s new flim Nightcrawler? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jim Flink and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.

 

Wikimedia Commons / wikimedia commons

President Barack Obama told the FCC he thinks it's time the independent agency acts on net neutrality, and regulate the Internet and service providers like other utilities.  It's uncertain how the FCC will act -- but Obama's request is being viewed as a "win" for consumers and businesses such as Netflix and Hulu and a blow to big telecom companies like Comcast and Verizon.

Matthew Yglesias, Vox: “Obama says FCC should reclassify the Internet’s regulatory status

KBIA

Access Missouri is a collaboration between KBIA, The Missouri Informatics Institute and The Truman School of Public Affairs here at MU. The site is a portal designed to collect publicly available data on Lawmakers. So far there have been more than 5,000 unique users, on the site that launched less than a week ago. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  KBIA and the University of Missouri announced plans to buy KWWC.  The lower-power FM station is currently owned by Stephens College.  Pending FCC approval, the new frequency will carry classical music around the clock while KBIA will switch to an all-news format from 4 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the purchase.

  Did the police call for a no-fly zone over Ferguson to keep the media out?  Find out what's on the Federal Aviation Administration recordings released by the Associated Press.  KBIA announces plans to go all-news all day with the purchase of another FM frequency, analysis of the midterm election coverage and a tribute to Car Talk’s Tom Magliozzi. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Austin Federa / KBIA

Over the weekend, the Associated Press published a report based on recordings it obtained that make it appear the no-fly zone established over Ferguson, Missouri was aimed at keeping the media out.

Jack Gillum & Joan Lowy, Associated Press: “AP Exclusive: Ferguson no-fly zone aimed at media

@CBCNews / Twitter

What would you consider the benchmarks of breaking news coverage? Wall-to-wall coverage with breathless anchors repeating the same sparse details over and over again, speculating on what they could mean, what could be happening and who might be involved? American television journalists got schooled last week, when a gunman opened fire at the Canadian Parliament. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

KBIA

  Last week, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch misquoted forensic expert, Dr. Judy Melinek's interpretation of Michael Brown’s autopsy. The Post-Dispatch stood by their original report until yesterday when it added an editor's note to the story saying Dr. Melinek wanted to clarify her statements. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  Were a forensic expert’s opinions taken out of context in the reporting of the findings of Michael Brown’s autopsy? Nearly a week after publication, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed a clarification of Dr. Judy Melinek’s interpretation of the report. Documents show the FBI co-opted the Seattle Times website to capture a teen suspected of bomb threats at a high school, why pressure from a gubernatorial candidate led to a Chicago Sun-Times reporter’s resignation and what sets apart breaking news coverage in Canada. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

KBIA

Were a forensic expert’s opinions taken out of context in the reporting of the findings of Michael Brown’s autopsy? Nearly a week after publication, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed a clarification of Dr. Judy Melinek’s interpretation of the report.

Last week, the National Association of Black Journalists issued a press release citing concern with the atmosphere and working conditions for African-Americans at the cable network. CNN responded by saying it was reconsidering its sponsorship of NABJ events. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

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