Views of the News

Wednesdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Each week, KBIA brings you a roundtable discussion about the media. Host Amy Simons and regular panelists Mike McKean and Earnest Perry from the Missouri School of Journalism provide analysis, commentary and criticism. Subscribe to us on iTunes

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A surprise twist in the Greitens invasion of privacy case earlier this week -- did anyone see it coming? Many in the White House are trying to stop all the leaks, and not the plumbing kind. Plus, print reporters cashing in on television appearances, new sports gambling laws and we ask the question: who won't be covering this weekend's Royal wedding festivities? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

The staff of the Denver Post has an unlikely advocate: the city’s mayor. He says the city needs the Post and its staff of dogged reporters, and is helping in its fight against its hedge fund owners. Also, Tronc recognizes the new union at the Chicago Tribune, NBC’s parent company makes a run for 21stCentury Fox and what has some of Charlie Rose’s accusers thinking he’s planning a comeback. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The staff of the Denver Post has an unlikely advocate: the city’s mayor. He says the city needs the Post and its staff of dogged reporters, and is helping in its fight against its hedge fund owners.

Chuck Plunkett, Rolling Stone: “Op-Ed: I stood up for ‘The Denver Post’ and was forced to resign

Maybe it’s time to retire the White House Correspondents’ Dinner? Michelle Wolf’s 15-minute act has many in our profession questioning the mission and purpose of the annual gala, and whether it’s time to put an end to it. Also, Missouri’s attorney general digs in on the governor, Tom Brokaw fights back against allegations of sexual misconduct and AM radio’s resurgence in Puerto Rico. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Maybe it’s time to retire the White House Correspondents’ Dinner? Michelle Wolf’s 15-minute act has many in our profession questioning the mission and purpose of the annual gala, and whether it’s time to put an end to it.

Sean Hannity is a commentator, not a journalist. But that still begs the question, did he owe it to viewers to disclose he’d discussed personal legal matters before it was revealed in open court? Also, coverage of the air strikes in Syria, James Comey’s first television interview, and what’s next for Governor Greitens. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress to answer questions about users’ privacy on the social media platform. At least one senator inquired as to why users don’t seem clear on how their data is collected and used. Could it lead to regulation?

via Flickr Brian Solis

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress to answer questions about users’ privacy on the social media platform. At least one senator inquired as to why users don’t seem clear on how their data is collected and used. Could it lead to regulation?

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product? Also, a return to #MeToo ground zero, as the Weinstein Company files for bankruptcy, tronc’s Michael Ferro retires amid misconduct allegations, and why Stormy Daniels might be able to get out from under that non-disclosure agreement afterall. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user www.quotecatalog.com

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product?

After more than 130 years of some of the most stunning photojournalism ever published, the editors of National Geographic acknowledged that for decades, much of that has been racist in its coverage of people of color. What spurred this confession and what commitment is there among today’s staff to change? Also, did O.J. Simpson admit to killing his ex-wife and her friend on a FOX special Sunday night, Tucker Carlson’s special report on the plight of men in America and reports of a deal between the Obamas and Netflix? What might Obama TV look like? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

After more than 130 years of some of the most stunning photojournalism ever published, the editors of National Geographic acknowledged that for decades, much of that has been racist in its coverage of people of color. What spurred this confession and what commitment is there among today’s staff to change?

Susan Goldberg, National Geographic: “For decades, our coverage was racist. To rise above our past, we must acknowledge it

It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts? Also, Sam Nunberg’s manic Monday media tour, covering school safety without creating a panic and sniffing out satire on social media platforms. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Monique Luisi: Views of the News.

via Flickr user 2012 Pop Culture Geek

It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts?It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts?

American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times. Also, why NBC insists on mispronouncing Pyeongchang, how high school journalists shifted the narrative in Parkland, Fla. and why a Seattle station spent $12,000 to forgive $1 million in viewers’ debt.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Mike Mozart

Kylie Jenner sent one tweet about a change in her Snapchat use and the company’s stock lost $1.3 billion in value. What did she say to cause investors to lose faith in the ephemeral platform? 

American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times. Also, why NBC insists on mispronouncing Pyeongchang, how high school journalists shifted the narrative in Parkland, Fla. and why a Seattle station spent $12,000 to forgive $1 million in viewers’ debt.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times.

Sinclair Broadcast Group has asked its news directors to consider donating personal funds to the company’s political action committee to help fund its lobbying efforts. Is it a conflict of interest to pay to lobby the leaders you’re covering? Also, coverage of the Winter Games from PyeongChang, Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s stay in the Celebrity Big Brother House and why a missing comma could get costly quickly. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Brett Johnson and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Sinclair Broadcast Group has asked its news directors to consider donating personal funds to the company’s political action committee to help fund its lobbying efforts. Is it a conflict of interest to pay to lobby the leaders you’re covering? 

It’s prime time for moviegoers, gearing up for the Academy Awards at the end of the month. Many of them are seeing as many films as they want for only $10 a month thanks to a new subscription service called MoviePass. How does it work and why are movie chains so against it? Also, Newsweek’s senior management fired in what might have been an act of retaliation, Tronc sells the Los Angeles Times and why the Las Vegas Review-Journal spiked a story about allegations of sexual misconduct against casino magnate Steve Wynn’s two decades ago. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Sarah_Ackerman

It’s prime time for moviegoers, gearing up for the Academy Awards at the end of the month. Many of them are seeing as many films as they want for only $10 a month thanks to a new subscription service called MoviePass. How does it work and why are movie chains so against it? 

President Trump delivered his first State of the Union address last night. Was it effective? We'll discuss. Facebook says it's going to increase the number of local news stories in your feed. How exactly will that work? Plus: Twitter bots, the Pope's take on fake news and a look at the news organizations that are being credited for exposing sexual abuse by U.S. Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas. Views of the News.

Think you’ve spotted fake news? Feel like you need to report it to someone? In Italy, news consumers are being asked to report fake news to a police agency who will fact check it, and if need be set the record straight. It might limit misinformation, but what effect might it have on freedom of the press? Also, coverage of the government shutdown, Rupert Murdoch’s suggestion that Facebook should pay publishers carriage fees like cable companies do the networks and the HuffPost ditches the model that’s defined it for years. 

Think you’ve spotted fake news? Feel like you need to report it to someone? In Italy, news consumers are being asked to report fake news to a police agency who will fact check it, and if need be set the record straight. It might limit misinformation, but what effect might it have on freedom of the press?

At least one Republican lawmaker is calling for Gov. Eric Greitens to resign following reports of an extramarital affair. Greitens denies details in a KMOV-TV report that he photographed the woman without her consent and used them to blackmail her. The station’s reporting is salacious and scandalous, but it is news? Does the public’s right to know about their elected officials’ behavior outweigh an individual’s right to privacy? Also, coverage of sexual misconduct accusations against Actor Aziz Ansari take a very different tone, President Trump’s use of language and drastic changes to the Facebook algorithm. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

At least one Republican lawmaker is calling for Gov. Eric Greitens to resign following reports of an extramarital affair. Greitens denies details in a KMOV-TV report that he photographed the woman without her consent and used them to blackmail her. The station’s reporting is salacious and scandalous, but it is news? Does the public’s right to know about their elected officials’ behavior outweigh an individual’s right to privacy? 

What happens when the president’s attorney’s try to block the publication of a White House tell-all? Sales go through the roof, of course… and buzz on television and radio gets louder and louder, quite literally. Where Wolff’s reporting techniques sound? Did the president’s surrogates hurt argument that anecdotes weren’t accurate? Also, how rumors of Oprah Winfrey’s 2020 presidential run made news, why the BBC’s China editor resigned her post, and a new publisher at the Columbia Daily Tribune. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What happens when the president’s attorney’s try to block the publication of a White House tell-all? Sales go through the roof, of course… and buzz on television and radio gets louder and louder, quite literally. Where Wolff’s reporting techniques sound? Did the president’s surrogates hurt argument that anecdotes weren’t accurate?

Michael Wolff, NY Magazine: “Donald Trump didn’t want to be president”

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