Views of the News

Wednesdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Each week, KBIA brings you a roundtable discussion about the media. Host Amy Simons and regular panelists Mike McKean and Earnest Perry from the Missouri School of Journalism provide analysis, commentary and criticism. Subscribe to us on iTunes

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Overblowing #Blizzard2015

5 hours ago
CNN

 Many news outlets this past week were going on and on about all the snow the east coast was going to get. Turns out, only parts of the east coast had more than two feet of snow. The big question was, is this a national or regional story? From Don Lemon going all over New York City in the CNN Blizzardmobile to reporters up to their waists in the snow. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA's media criticism program, "Views of the News.” 


Parts of the east coast were clobbered by more than two feet of snow.  But is it a national story or a regional one? From live reporters up to their waists in fallen snow to the CNN Blizzardmobile driving around during a statewide travel ban, we’ll break down the coverage. Indiana’s governor announces plans for a new state-run news agency, drawing criticism from journalists comparing it to North Korea and the former Soviet Union, why a gangster rapper’s lyrics could land him 25 years to life in prison, and a look ahead at Sunday’s Super Bowl telecast. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Anthony Quintano

Parts of the east coast were clobbered with more than two feet of snow. But is it a national story or a regional one? From live reporters standing waist-deep in fallen snow to the CNN Blizzardmobile driving around New York City during a statewide travel ban, we'll break down the coverage.

Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

The French publication Charlie Hebdo has a long history of publishing controversial cartoons. But after an attack on its offices that left 10 staff and two police officers dead, news organizations are grappling with the ethics of reprinting those same cartoons. The graphic depictions may provide relevant context, yet are deeply offensive to many of the Muslim faith. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the publication on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."


It was a big night for the cast and crew of both Boyhood and the Amazon series Transparent, as each walked away with two Golden Globe awards Sunday. The CW Network received its first Golden Globe for Gina Rodriguez's performance in Jane the Virgin. Yet with only one award given to the major broadcast networks,  ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox were left out in the cold. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the Golden Globes and the future of television on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

It’s been more than a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out its first edition, again with a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the cover.  Who is republishing the cartoons? Who isn’t? Is it possible to give this story context without using it? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Valentina Cala

It's been a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out is first edition since the January 7, 2015 shooting that left 12 dead.  On its cover: another cartoon showing the image of the Prophet Mohammed.  What message are editors trying to send?

Serial promo image
Chicago Public Media

The podcast Serial, created by the staff of This American Life, ended its first season in mid-December with an estimated 40 million downloads. A year in the making, reporter Sarah Koenig was ultimately unable to decide whether high school student Adnan Syed, now serving a life sentence, was guilty of murdering his ex-girlfriend 15 years ago. The key witness in the case, Jay Wilds, refused to give Koenig an on-tape interview. But last week The Intercept got Wilds to talk. What he said about Koenig led opponents and defenders to debate her journalistic integrity. Bob Priddy joined Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry and Mike McKean to discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."


 

Critics say legislative term limits and declining interest by established media in covering state government have produced a loss of institutional memory that is crippling collaboration and coverage on important issues. Former MissouriNet news director Bob Priddy joins Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry and Mike McKean to discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

  

Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

On Tuesday, January 7, French authorities confirmed three gunman shot and killed 12 people in Paris at the offices of the weekly satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The paper has run cartoons and other content satirizing radical Islam, and the Prophet Mohammed. In 2011, the paper was firebombed. 

French President Francois Holland called the shootings a "terrorist attack of the most extreme barbarity" and video shows armed gunman running through the streets of Paris. As of the shows' recording, the suspects remain at large. 

  A gunman targets Paris weekly Charlie Hebdo known for satirizing Islam and the prophet Mohammed.  Also, a preview of the legislative session now underway in Jefferson City, why Kirby Delauter doesn’t want his name in the press,  the historical accuracy of the film Selma, and remembering ESPN’s Stuart Scott.  From the Missouri School of Journalism, Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Bob Priddy: Views of the News.


Jacky Naegelen / Reuters

Catch our show today at 6:30pm on KBIA

Terrorists Kill 12 at Paris Paper

Three gunmen killed 12 people and injured several more at a weekly Paris newspaper that has satirized Islam and the prophet Mohammed.

Nicholas Vinocur and Antony Paone, Reuters, "At least 12 dead in Paris attack on satirical newspaper"

  A New York City high school student makes $72 million playing the stock market? The headline offered the promise of a story that was almost too good to be true. Turns out the teen, Mohammed Islam, made up the whole story. It joins an increasingly long list of prominent stories unraveling due to fact checking.  Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

Courtesy NBC

  When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including waterboarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  Are the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques torture? Former Vice President Dick Cheney gives Chuck Todd his definition of “torture” on Meet the Press. The Cosbys break their silence, MSNBC launches “The Shift” to test new programming online, and New York Magazine is duped by a high school student. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including water boarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. 

The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use.

via Flickr user Bob Mical

  

Rolling Stone has issued an apology for its November story, "A rape on campus: A brutal assault and struggle for justice at UVA," saying that the magazine didn't do enough in verifying an unidentified student's account of sexual assault. Was Sabrina Rubin Erdely's reporting flawed? Why didn't she interview the accused? What did the fact-checking look like on that article?  And, why did Rolling Stone quietly change its apology, removing the statement the magazine "misplaced" its trust in "Jackie?” 

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.

 

For more, follow Views of the News on FacebookTwitter, and YouTube.

via Flickr user Bob Mical

Rolling Stone has issued an apology for its November story, "A rape on campus: A brutal assault and struggle for justice at UVA," saying that the magazine didn't do enough in verifying an unidentified student's account of sexual assault. 

IMDB

The film, The Immitation Game, carries a PG-13 rating and The New York Times warns the film contains illicit sex, cataclysmic violence & advanced math?! Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

 


via Flickr user Gordon Correll

Comedian Chris Rock is on a publicity tour, promoting his new film Top Five. In multiple interviews Rock is asked about his reactions to the recent events in Ferguson and his take on racism in America. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Janay Rice speaks out

Dec 4, 2014
via Flickr user mdennes

On Friday, former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice won his appeal. A judge ruled the NFL’s indefinite suspension against him be vacated. In the wake of this news, ESPN released an essay written by Rice’s wife, Janay, who became a public figure after a video of an altercation between the two was leaked to the media. ESPN said no questions were off limits but final control over the essay and its publication was left up to Janay. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


Chris Rock tells New York magazine that white people are “less crazy than they used to be.” Why the actor-comedian’s remarks about race, Ferguson and President Obama are giving many reasons for pause. Janay Rice steadfastly stands behind her husband in interviews with ESPN and NBC, evidence suggests North Korea could be behind a computer hack that resulted in the leak of several new Sony Pictures movies, and why a New York Times movie review might have you thinking of math in a new light. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Gordon Correll

Comedian Chris Rock has been talking to reporters, doing a publicity tour for his new film, Top Five.  The timing has resulting in several questions about Ferguson,  the grand jury's decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson, the coverage of race in America, and the Obama presidency.

Frank Rick, New York: “In Conversation Chris Rock: What’s killing comedy. What’s saving America.

http://www.9jumpin.com.au/

  Karl Stefanovic, the anchor of Australia’s Today Show, wanted to see if anyone would notice if he wore the same blue suit for a year. No one noticed! Meanwhile, if his co-host wore the same outfit more than once a week, she got critical emails and calls from viewers. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

An executive of the app-based ride-sharing company, unhappy with critical media coverage, suggested it should dig up personal information about journalists and make it public. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

NPR’s Scott Simon asked Bill Cosby some pointed questions about allegations waged against him, but were the questions about sexual assault allegations or something else? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


NPR’s Scott Simon asked Bill Cosby some pointed questions about allegations waged against him, but were the questions about sexual assault allegations or something else?  An Uber executive unhappy about media coverage looks to dig up dirt on unfriendly journalists, the Orange County Register looks to reporters to take on paper delivery routes and why an Australian television anchor’s decision to wear the same suit every day for a year is earning him high praise from feminists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

NPR's Scott Simon had the first interview with actor-comedian Bill Cosby following the recent allegations of sexual assault against him.  Simon asked Cosby on Saturday Weekend Edition if he wanted to address those allegations.  

  Jake Gyllenhaal's character in the new movie 'Nightcrawler,' makes a name for himself shooting videos of crime scenes and selling them to news channels...but how much of that happens in real life? Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

glenn beck
The Blaze

Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck told fans that for the past few years, he’s been suffering from a mysterious neurological illness. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


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