Views of the News

Wednesdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Each week, KBIA brings you a roundtable discussion about the media. Host Amy Simons and regular panelists Mike McKean and Earnest Perry from the Missouri School of Journalism provide analysis, commentary and criticism. Subscribe to us on iTunes

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The New York Times has had to walk back its story on a "criminal" probe of Hillary Clinton's private email server while the paper is vigorously defending another of its exclusives...on abuses in the nail salon industry.  The first Republican presidential debate is only a week away.  Some wonder whether all the scrambling to meet the Fox News criteria for inclusion is worth the trouble.  More bad news for the newspaper business: major layoffs and poor performance with minority employment.  Media companies are embracing a new revenue source that raises ethical questions.  And research shows "visual" news sites are more successful.

  Is any publicity good publicity for Donald Trump?  He’s certainly testing that proposition with his attack on John McCain’s war record.  And some say the media are depriving more serious presidential contenders of oxygen by focusing so much on the real estate mogul and reality TV star.  Amateur drones are getting in the way of California firefighters.  The publisher of the celebrity gossip site Gawker pulls a salacious story, prompting two of his editors to quit.  Critics accuse journalists of being too quick to blame sexism for the resignation of Reddit’s CEO.  And Harper Lee’s new novel raises some difficult questions for reviewers.  It’s Views of the News with Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Lynda Kraxberger and Jamie Grey.

Go Set a Watchman cover
Harper Collins

Donald Trump's rise in the polls angers veterans and gives GOP presidential opponents an opening in Iowa.  Have the news media given the real estate mogul too much oxygen?  We'll also look at dangerous drones, a scandal at Gawker (go figure), Ellen Pao's exit from Reddit and the bigger picture behind reaction to Harper Lee's new novel.

Media to Blame for Trump’s Rise?

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions. Also, the Kansas City Star reports on a culture of sexual harassment at the state capitol and a look at a wave of compassionate acts among competing newsrooms. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Amanda Hinnant: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Quinn Dombrowski

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions on marriage equality, the death penalty, health care subsidies, and more.

Pop rocker Taylor Swift takes a bite out of Apple, forcing the company to revise its royalty payment plans for the new Apple Music streaming system. What lessons could journalists take from her demand for fair pay? Also, the deadly shooting at Emanuel AME Church reignited the national conversation about race, but has the media done its job to move that conversation forward. And, you can take the “interim” off Lester Holt’s title as anchor of NBC Nightly News. We’ll look at what’s ahead for the network as Brian Williams’ suspension expires and he moves to MSNBC. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Jana Beamer

Less than 24 hours after pop rocker Taylor Swift told Apple she'd withhold her hit album, 1989, from the new Apple Music streaming service, the company revised its plan for royalty payouts. Originally, Apple wasn't planning to pay record labels royalties for streams during the free three-month trial period.

Taylor Swift: “To Apple, Love Taylor

  A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. Also, how an Arkansas judge’s alternative sentencing stands to affect one television station’s editorial product, why Glenn Greenwald says a story in the Sunday Times is “the opposite of journalism,” and the experiment to drive home the importance of mobile at the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.

Courtesy KXLY-TV

A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. What is it like to ask questions of someone when you know it'll likely change the course of their life forever? Has the media been fair to Rachel Dolezal, her experience and her story?

Jeff Humphrey, KXLY: "First on KXLY: Rachel Dolezal responds to race allegations"

Fox News Channel scored huge ratings with last week’s exclusive interview with members of the Duggar family. Megyn Kelly promised to ask the tough questions. Did she? Did the Duggars do anything to help themselves in the court of public opinion? Also, how the gender gap affects the quality of news reporting, the next steps at Gawker Media now that employees agree to union representation, and an NPR/ProPublica follows Red Cross spending in Haiti. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.


Courtesy Fox News Channel

Members of the Duggar family appeared on Fox News Channel's The Kelly File to to talk about the abuse allegations against the oldest child, Josh. Jessa Duggar Seewald and Jill Duggar Dillard told Megyn Kelly they are two of their brother's victims. But, they said, they've long forgiven him. Instead, they say, it the media violated them and privacy laws were broken in the process.

  Call her Caitlyn. It’s a message that seems simple enough, yet some in the media continue to refer to Caitlyn Jenner using her birth name and male pronouns.

Also, why employees at Gawker Media are voting on union organization, the ethics of fabricating a scientific study to prove a point about shoddy science journalism and an former FIFA official’s unofficial defense against corruption charges? An article in The Onion.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Cable channel TLC pulled the reality tv series “19 Kids & Counting” amidst allegations the eldest child, Josh Duggar, was named in an underage sex abuse complaint. When did TLC first learn of the allegations? What was Oprah Winfrey’s role in the investigation? Also, what’s in Hillary Clinton’s emails, why the New York Times says its cutting back on the number of movies it reviews and how trauma affects journalists on the job. 

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Lwp Kommunikacio

Cable channel TLC pulled the reality tv series “19 Kids & Counting” amidst allegations the eldest child, Josh Duggar, was named in an underage sex abuse complaint. When did TLC first learn of the allegations?

In Touch Weekly: "Bombshell Duggar police report: Jim Bob Duggar didn’t report son Josh’s alleged sex offenses for more than a year

The End of an Era: The End of 'Idol'

May 15, 2015
Flickr/Catherine Savage

One of the first television shows that incorporated the audience, American Idol comes to an end. FOX offcially announced the competition show's 15 season will be its last. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

ESPN Cuts Ties With Bill Simmons

May 14, 2015
via Flickr user kpop im

  ESPN fired controversial columnist Bill Simmons Friday after he made comments about NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

The Cost Behind Nice Nails

May 14, 2015
via Flickr user madame.furie

The New York Times published an investigative piece on the high price of cheap nails. The article quickly got people to think twice about bargain salons, and regulation changes are already underway. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

  The New York Times got America talking about the high price of cheap manicures. We’ll talk about the blockbuster investigation, the near-immediate regulatory changes it’s already brought to the industry and the paper’s decision to roll it out online days before it appeared in print to create buzz. Also, the mega merger between Verizon and AOL, why some are critical of Seymour Hersh’s assertion the Obama administration lied about bin Laden and the end of “American Idol.” From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Verizon has announced it plans to buy AOL for $4.4 billion in an effort to drive the provider's mobile and over-the-top (OTT) video strategies. 

Why Words Matter in Media Coverage

May 12, 2015
via Wikimedia user Veggies

A term used to describe protesters in Baltimore is ruffling some feathers. Some are saying that "thug" is now synonymous with the n-word. Missouri School of journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the implications of the term on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

Periscope: Advance or Hinder Transparency?

May 11, 2015
Flickr/ Tord Sollie

The Professional Golfers' Association of America revoked the media credentials of blogger Stephanie Wei. Wei used the live-streaming app Periscope to broadcast from a practice round of the WGC-Cadillac Match Play Championship in a way that the PGA said violated its terms.

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

WikiMedia user Dnd523

 CNN's chief medical correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta performed brain surgery on an 8-year-old girl while on assignment covering the 7.8-magnitude earthquake. In fact, CNN filmed the procedure. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the ethical issues behind this on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

Flickr/ Marc Nozell

The House Select Committee on Benghazi requested that Hillary Clinton appear twice, once on the use of her email system, and once on the Benghazi attack in 2012. Clinton's lawyer David E. Kendall rejected stating that Clinton is willing to appear once in a public hearing to discuss both issues. 

  Cable companies and professional sports leagues say journalists live-streaming violates their copyright. How far will they go to stop it? And, how are reporters responding? Also, what happens when a journalist – who is also a surgeon – is sent to cover a natural disaster, how the New York Times customized a story just for you, an analysis of the coverage of Freddie Gray’s death and the Baltimore protests and more.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Wikimedia user Veggies

There's quiet in the streets of Baltimore again, but the media is still talking about the death of Freddie Gray and the protests that erupted in the aftermath.

David Zurawik, Baltimore Sun: “FOP besmirches media, but WBAL has clear conflict of interest with prosecutor’s office

670 The Score

  Two Chicago sports radio personalities on 670 The Score caught some flak after a Twitter exchange of sexist comments went viral. A few weeks later, the station announced it hired Julie DiCaro to contribute sports blogs for the WSCR-AM and CBSChicago.com website. 

The Score acknowledged its need for female representation. 

Study Shows Women Journalists Burn Out Faster Than Men

Apr 30, 2015
Softmedia

The journalism field is demanding. The long, intense hours and news-never-ends-therefore-we-don't-stop mentality can lead to a burnout. A recent University of Kansas study shows that female workers are tending to leave the field earlier than their counterparts. University of Missouri professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss why that might be on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

WCIA-TV

Champaign, IL local TV personality and anchor Dave Benton shared saddening news with the audience. Benton is stricken with brain cancer, and last fall he announced doctors said he only had about six months to live. Benton continued anchoring until just recently when he declared he is unable to continue working due to a weakening eyesight. 

Courtesy NBC

Former Dateline NBC program, "To Catch a Predator" may make a comeback. The show was hosted by Chris Hansen where he and the civilian watchdog group, Perverted-Justice teamed up to lure people looking to have sex with minors. The last episode aired seven years ago, and Hansen is looking to bring the program back, but this time he'll call it, "Hansen vs. Predator."

Missouri School of Journalism professors and "Views of the News" hosts Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss Hansen's quest to harvest support through Kickstarter.

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    


Rand Paul Versus The Media

Apr 20, 2015
Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Republican candidate Rand Paul is prickly. At least when he's being interviewed. Paul got into it with The Today Show's Savannah Guthrie, Fox News' Megyn Kelly and The Guardian's Paul Lewis. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss whose skin is thinner.

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

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