Views of the News

Wednesdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Each week, KBIA brings you a roundtable discussion about the media. Host Amy Simons and regular panelists Mike McKean and Earnest Perry from the Missouri School of Journalism provide analysis, commentary and criticism. Subscribe to us on iTunes

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What would you consider the benchmarks of breaking news coverage? Wall-to-wall coverage with breathless anchors repeating the same sparse details over and over again, speculating on what they could mean, what could be happening and who might be involved? American television journalists got schooled last week, when a gunman opened fire at the Canadian Parliament. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

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  Last week, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch misquoted forensic expert, Dr. Judy Melinek's interpretation of Michael Brown’s autopsy. The Post-Dispatch stood by their original report until yesterday when it added an editor's note to the story saying Dr. Melinek wanted to clarify her statements. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  Were a forensic expert’s opinions taken out of context in the reporting of the findings of Michael Brown’s autopsy? Nearly a week after publication, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed a clarification of Dr. Judy Melinek’s interpretation of the report. Documents show the FBI co-opted the Seattle Times website to capture a teen suspected of bomb threats at a high school, why pressure from a gubernatorial candidate led to a Chicago Sun-Times reporter’s resignation and what sets apart breaking news coverage in Canada. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

KBIA

Were a forensic expert’s opinions taken out of context in the reporting of the findings of Michael Brown’s autopsy? Nearly a week after publication, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed a clarification of Dr. Judy Melinek’s interpretation of the report.

Last week, the National Association of Black Journalists issued a press release citing concern with the atmosphere and working conditions for African-Americans at the cable network. CNN responded by saying it was reconsidering its sponsorship of NABJ events. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Remembering Ben Bradlee

Oct 22, 2014
via Flickr user Miguel Ariel Contreras Drake-McLaughlin

 Ben Bradlee, former top editor at the Washington Post, died at his Washington, D.C. home Tuesday. He was 93 years old. Bradlee ran the paper for more than 26 years, taking over in 1965, and transforming it into one of the nation's strongest daily newspapers of record. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Gov. Jay Nixon announces the creation of the Ferguson Commission to study the social and education conditions that led to the shooting death of Michael Brown. Why is the governor doing this now? Also, how the media covered the Keene, New Hampshire Pumpkin Fest unrest, a battle between the National Association of Black Journalists and CNN, the Associated Press runs advertising through its Twitter account and claims a gubernatorial candidate sidelined a political reporter. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

KBIA file photo

Gov. Jay Nixon announced a plan to create a Ferguson Commission on Tuesday.  The newly-formed panel is charged with studying the social and economic conditions that led to the August shooting death of unarmed teen Michael Brown.

Why is Nixon doing this now? How might the timing be influenced by a New York Times report detailing leaks of evidence presented to the grand jury investigating the case that supports Officer Darren Wilson's recollection of events?

CitizenFour

Laura Poitras' documentary, CitizenFour, will screen in Columbian, Mo. on Sunday in conjunction with True/False. The film documents NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden's meetings with journalists from the Guardian in a Hong Kong hotel room. Early reviews of the film are strong, and already there's Oscar talk buzzing around it.​ Could this film change public perception? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss. 

Courtesy NIAID

The Associated Press has said it won't be reporting every instance in which an individual is tested for Ebola. The goal of the media should not be to create undue fear among the population. How much of the reporting out there is helpful, how much is creating panic? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

NBC Cheif Medical Editor, Dr. Nancy Snyderman, broke her voluntary Ebola quarantine to go get takeout from her favorite restaurant. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss NBC’s released statement on the issue and weigh in on whether Snyderman should have personally apologized for the incident. ​

Do you want to know about every person tested for Ebola or hear about every airline passenger with a fever? Has the media’s attempts to localize the Ebola epidemic gone too far, resulting in the reporting of “non-stories?” New Jersey puts NBC Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Synderman under a mandatory quarantine after she was spotted picking up soup from her favorite restaurant. Speculation swirls after North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un reappears after 40 days without a trace and the New York Times says it’s time to end the trade embargo against Cuba – in Spanish. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

NBC Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman and the team she worked with in Liberia are now under a mandatory quarantine ordered by the New Jersey Health Department.

On last week's Views of the News, we talked about how Synderman was self-monitoring and in isolation after being exposed to Ebola by cameraman Ashoka Mukpo.

    The Ebola outbreak hits American soil.  A photojournalist working for NBC News is treated for the illness while his colleagues are in a self-imposed quarantine.  Did the Liberian man doctors diagnosed in Dallas have an expectation of privacy? Or should the media have broadcast his name far and wide?    Daily Show alum John Oliver says he’s not a journalist, but many journalists disagree. Find out why his brand of investigative reporting is getting the industry’s attention. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jim Flink and Jamie Greber: Views of the News.

Courtesy NIAID

The diagnoses of two high-profile cases of Ebola have changed how the media is covering the viral outbreak in the United States. 

A freelance photojournalist working for NBC News said he started to feel symptoms a few days after joining the crew.  He's back in the United States, and his prognosis is reportedly good.  His colleagues -- NBC employees -- are home, too, in self-quarantined for a period of 21 days.

  Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards. How do you keep the trolls from invading your news site’s smart, open dialogue? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: a special edition of Views of the News.


via Twitter

Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards.

The psychology of web trolling

Courtesy WMC-TV

    If we're being honest, we laugh at people on television who accidentally say curse words, or reporters and photographers who have to react quickly before a bad situation gets worse. But, we rarely know the story behind the story. Here's one of those. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    The pressure is on for big-name NFL advertisers, like CoverGirl cosmetics, to pull their ad dollars after the Ray Rice domestic abuse scandal. How has the news media contributed to the discussion? Should companies pull ads? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    

  Advertisers are starting to feel pressure to drop their NFL sponsorships in light of how the league is handling domestic abuse cases. What role has the news media played in that?  Also, the Columbia Missourian fact-checks the “Mizzou Made” commercial, and some emotional moments in local television news. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

There is pressure on the big-name sponsors of the National Football League to pull their advertising dollars in the aftermath of the domestic abuse scandal.  The public has joined the chant, calling attention to Cover Girl cosmetics (left) for its "Game Face" campaign, using manipulated images of made-up women with bruises on their face.  How has the news media contributed to the discussion?

A visibly-nervous Chuck Todd took over last Sunday morning as the moderator of NBC's flagship political program, "Meet the Press." With the show having previously experienced a drop in ratings many wonder if audiences are over Sunday morning talk shows -- or if Todd has the power to turn things around. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. After TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely. “Fox & Friends” co-hosts responded to the video with comments including “she still married him” and “the message is, when you're in an elevator, there's a camera." Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  

    

  More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. For months the NFL was criticized by activists, reporters and columnists for only having suspended him from the first two regular season games. But after TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely.Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

The Baltimore Ravens cut Ray Rice after TMZ releases graphic video of him assaulting his now-wife in a hotel elevator, six months after the incident. How did media pressure play into the decision? NBC re-launches “Meet the Press” with Chuck Todd at the helm, Bloomberg News fails to cover the return of it’s CEO, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and why another new reporting fellowship the Huffington Post has some journalism purists raising an eyebrow. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Keith Allison / Flickr

More than six months ago, Ray Rice was caught on surveillance video beating his then-fiancee unconscious in an Atlantic City hotel elevator.   In July, the National Football League disciplined Rice for the incident, suspending him from the first two regular season games.

Throughout the summer, the league came under heavy criticism in the press.  Activists, reporters and columnists came down hard on the NFL for having stiffer penalties for players charged with illegal drug use. 

A group of minority journalists are fighting to bring more diversity to American newsrooms, journalism conferences, panels and classrooms. The Journalism Diversity Project is designed to make it easy for hiring managers and event organizers to find qualified experts who are journalists of color. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss. 

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) called out male senate colleagues for comments made about her body, like “pooky” and “fat,” in her new book, Off the Sidelines. Should the names of the senators be revealed?

Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

 

Video claims to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff.  How big of a gaffe was it when President Barack Obama said he doesn’t “have a strategy yet” for dealing with ISIS in Syria? Should reporters name names when saying they’ve experienced boorish behavior at the hands of U.S. senators? And, the steps the St. Louis media is taking to keep the story of Ferguson on the front page. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

via SITE

A video released by the militant group ISIS appears to show the beheading of American journalist Steven J. Sotloff, 31.  The freelance reporter was taken captive while reporting on the bloody civil war in Syria last year.  Sotloff is the second American journalist slain by ISIS militants in two weeks in retaliation for military strikes against the group.

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