Agriculture

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

A referendum on raising the fees cattle farmers pay has cleared its first legal challenge, though a final court decision still remains weeks away.

A Cole County court has scheduled a hearing for March 21 on whether to halt the April election. Judge Patricia Joyce on Thursday declined to issue a temporary restraining order that would have stopped election preparations.

Insight – A Balanced Approach

Feb 17, 2016

Doug sits down with Peter Scharf, a professor in the Division of Plant Sciences and an MU Extension soil scientist, to talk about the financial and environmental benefits of area corn farmers using vehicle-mounted crop sensors to apply the precise amount of nitrogen to their fields.

Doug sits down with Peter Scharf, a professor in the Division of Plant Sciences and an MU Extension soil scientist, to talk about the financial and environmental benefits of area corn farmers using vehicle-mounted crop sensors to apply the precise amount of nitrogen to their fields.

 

Farm Income Declining in Region

Feb 11, 2016
farmland
File / KBIA

 The Federal Reserve says farm income continued to decline during the fourth quarter in Midwestern and Western states, so farmers are borrowing more.

But the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, Missouri, said Thursday that bankers report few problems with farmers failing to make loan payments.

Farm income is down because prices have declined for cattle, soybeans, wheat and corn.

The value of farmland continues to decline. The value of non-irrigated land declined 4 percent in the fourth quarter, and irrigated land values slipped 2 percent from the previous year.

Doug sits down with Anne McKendry, an associate professor of wheat breeding and genetics in the Division of Plant Sciences. Since arriving at MU nearly 30 years ago, McKendry has become of the country’s most successful wheat breeders, heaving sent out several lines out to the Missouri and national markets – all of which have a very high resistance to the deadly Fusarium head blight fungus.

Doug sits down with Laura McCann, a professor of agricultural and applied economics, to talk about a unique field study she did a few years back and Columbia’s City Hall building in regards to toilet use in relation to human behavior and behavioral economics.

Doug sits down with Laura McCann, a professor of agricultural and applied economics, to talk about a unique field study she did a few years back and Columbia’s City Hall building in regards to toilet use in relation to human behavior and behavioral economics.

Courtesy Office of the U.S. Trade Representative

 

The U.S. is formally part of the biggest global trade partnership in history after the countries involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership symbolically signed the deal in New Zealand. For President Obama, now comes the hard work.  

Twelve countries bordering the Pacific Ocean negotiated for years to hammer out the TPP. Though the deal is expected to open up new markets for American agricultural exports, especially soybeans and beef, it remains controversial.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

 

 

For almost a year, presidential candidates have been crisscrossing Iowa, wooing voters in a state that relies on agriculture for about one-third of its economy. But even here, most voters live in cities or suburbs and don’t have a first-hand connection to the farm.

The Greenley Research Center near Novelty, Mo., uses drainage water management in an effort to generate and regulate the amount of water in its fields. Kelly Nelson (left) and Dana Harder join Doug to discuss this system and how beneficial it has been at Greenley.

Insight is a production of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

 

 

The Greenley Research Center near Novelty, Mo., uses drainage water management in an effort to generate and regulate the amount of water in its fields. Kelly Nelson (left) and Dana Harder join Doug to discuss this system and how beneficial it has been at Greenley.

 

Courtesy Bur-Wall Registered Holsteins

 

Once a generation, a diva is crowned. She earns a reputation for being independent, polished, fearless and of limitless talent, unreachable by us normal folk. After years of climbing the ladder, she claims her crown.

Holsteins of the world have their new queen, and her name is Gigi.

The monarch butterfly population has seen a decline in the last 20 years. Doug sits down with Dusty Walter, director of natural resources for the Agricultural Experiment Station and the superintendent of the Wurdack Research Center, to discuss what has led to that decline. Walter will also discuss what the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Research Centers are doing to help support the monarch population.

Insight is a production of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

Doug sits down with Peter Sutovsky. As a professor both of reproductive physiology and obstetrics, gynecology and women’s health, Sutovsky has devoted his career to researching the collective ties between the fertility issues that affect both humans and livestock animals. He will talk about some of those shared characteristics that has helped guide his research.

Doug sits down with Peter Sutovsky. As a professor both of reproductive physiology and obstetrics, gynecology and women’s health, Sutovsky has devoted his career to researching the collective ties between the fertility issues that affect both humans and livestock animals. He will talk about some of those shared characteristics that has helped guide his research.

Insight is a production of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

 

    

    

The massive Trans Pacific Partnership, or TPP, trade deal could require some countries to accept more genetically engineered crops.

The TPP is the largest free trade agreement in history, and while not yet approved by Congress, includes the U.S. and 11 other countries along the Pacific Ocean. 

Here’s how genetically engineered crops figure into the equation:

Doug sits down and chats with Pat Market, professor of atmospheric science, about preparing for the upcoming winter weather. The two also discuss thundersnow, a snowstorm featuring thunder and lightning.

Doug sits down and chats with Pat Market, professor of atmospheric science, about preparing for the upcoming winter weather. The two also discuss thundersnow, a snowstorm featuring thunder and lightning.

Insight is a production of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

 

 

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

 

A highly contagious strain of avian flu, a huge trade pact opening export markets and a few “restless” agribusinesses top Harvest Public Media's list of the biggest agriculture and food stories of 2015.

No. 1 – A bird flu never before seen in North America devastated the egg and turkey industries, sending prices up and the government scrambling to respond.

Doug sits down with Kristin Whitworth (left), a research scientist in the Division of Animal Sciences, to talk about the recent findings that were made in the fight against a deadly disease that annually costs the pork industry hundreds of millions of dollars. She’ll also talk about the revolutionary CRISPR system used in this work and how it has opened new possibilities for her and her colleagues, including Randall Prather (center) and Kevin Wells (left), in terms of getting faster results while lowering overall lab costs at the same time.

  Doug sits down with Kristin Whitworth (left), a research scientist in the Division of Animal Sciences, to talk about the recent findings that were made in the fight against a deadly disease that annually costs the pork industry hundreds of millions of dollars. She’ll also talk about the revolutionary CRISPR system used in this work and how it has opened new possibilities for her and her colleagues, including Randall Prather (center) and Kevin Wells (left), in terms of getting faster results while lowering overall lab costs at the same time.

  With the holiday season in full bloom, Doug sits down with two guests – Bangkosh Vardhanabhuti, assistant professor of food science, and Heather Leidy, assistant professor in the department of nutrition and exercise physiology – to talk about some ways to feel fuller longer and thus, avoid packing on extra pounds from too many sweet treats.

Insight is a production of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

 

With the holiday season in full bloom, Doug sits down with two guests – Bangkosh Vardhanabhuti, assistant professor of food science, and Heather Leidy, assistant professor in the department of nutrition and exercise physiology – to talk about some ways to feel fuller longer and thus, avoid packing on extra pounds from too many sweet treats.

Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

 

The amount of ethanol blended into the U.S. fuel supply will go up under new rules issued Monday.

In releasing the details of the Renewable Fuel Standard, the policy that sets the amount of biofuels oil refiners must blend into the fuel supply, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it planned to continue to increase the proportion renewable fuels, most of which is comprised of corn ethanol.

Missouri's corn and soybean harvests continue to look good, especially corn.

November estimates from the United States Department of Agriculture shows that corn growers are averaging 145 bushels an acre, which so far is the fourth-highest return in state history.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

 

A new trade deal aimed at cutting thousands of taxes and opening markets with 11 Pacific Rim nations has drawn heavy lobbying from some of America’s largest agribusinesses.

The deal – known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership – was reached in early October. It is designed to ease the flow of goods between partner nations by lowering restrictive trade policies and regulations.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

The immigrant workers that pick crops like cotton and melons in the U.S. can have a tough time finding a place to live. The rural areas where they can find work often lack the social services and affordable housing. That means many farm worker families end up in dilapidated buildings, which can come with health risks.

courtesy USDA

 

This post was updated with a new statement from USDA.

A senior scientist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture filed a whistleblower complaint on Wednesday accusing the federal agency of suppressing research findings that could call into question the use of a popular pesticide class that is a revenue powerhouse for the agrichemical industry.

Jonathan Lundgren, a senior research entomologist with the USDA’s Agriculture Research Service who has spent 11 years with the agency based in Brookings, S.D., said that retaliation and harassment from inside USDA started in April 2014, following media interviews he gave in March of that year regarding some of his research conclusions.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

All week, Harvest Public Media’s series Choice Cuts: Meat In America is examining how the meat industry is changing the U.S. food system and the American diet.

Beef, poultry and pork are staples of the American diet, baked into the country’s very culture, and backbones of the agricultural economy. But lately, the meats have been saddled with some baggage.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

All week, Harvest Public Media’s series Choice Cuts: Meat In America is examining how the meat industry is changing the U.S. food system and the American diet.

While the average American eats hundreds of pounds of meat every year, many U.S. consumers are starting to cut back as health experts learn more about the risk of a diet high in proteins from meat and environmentalists challenge the way most meat is raised.

That leaves farmers and ranchers to raise meat animals with health-conscious meat-eaters in mind.

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